A Travellerspoint blog

October 2007

Wuyi Shan! The Noise Level of Bamboo Rafting!

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya, Bamboo rafting hey. You want to talk about bamboo rafting at Wuyi Shan do you? You don't want to talk about it? You actually want to do it? Have you gone mad? Are you insane? My gawd, what a horrid experience that was! And I bloody well paid 100 Yuan for the experience! Gawd I love China even when it really annoys the hell outta me! So we meet down stairs and then headed to the chicken shop for breakfast. I then had to rely on my internal map. For the life of me I couldn't remember where the bus station was. We caught a bus home last time and I remembered it being a simple counter and not a bus station at all. There were three bus stations marked on the map and we headed to the first one but it simply didn't feel right and for some reason I walked in the opposite direction and there it was, a simple crappy counter with nothing to say it was a bus station but the bus station we needed it was. After a few minutes of this and that we left with all the afternoon bus times back to Shaowu. I even surprised myself that time! After waving down another grave robbing taxi driver we finally agreed on a price and off we sped to Wharf No: 3. The price I agreed on was to take us to the wharf and not to kill us. The cab driver obviously misunderstood me and thought I told him to have a head on collision on the way. He tried his hardest I can tell you, but sadly for him we arrived at the wharf alive. He must have thought he failed us as he didn't even try to ask me for more money like many taxi drivers do. Even after agreeing on a price many of them still give you the 'my baby is starving' look when you arrive. Strangely it is always in the places like Wuyi Shan where most of the cabs don't even have a meter in them. They run the town and no one has any choice but to agree on a price you'd normally pay for a much longer ride. Argh, you can't take it with you. The ancient Egyptian tombs have proven that. After arriving we found out we had about an hour and a half to wait and after chatting to 'someone' we found out that further down at Xingcun Wharf (Wharf No: 1) there was a bunch of rafts leaving in half an hour. We made our way along the river and found the line to then be totally ignored buy the ticket people. It seemed that everyone in line was from a Tour Company and they all had vouchers for huge amounts of tickets. I understood enough to know that several of them were telling the ticket people NOT to sell us tickets. I told a few of them 'something bad about their mother and myself' and we then had to make our way back to Wharf No: 1. When we arrived the ticket lady finally opened the window and one other person and myself lined up. After the only other person in line walked away with their tickets a girl came running up and totally pushed me out of the way and began waving her money in the air. And I'm sure there are many of the people who read my blog that totally don't believe me when I talk about the Chinese and their total lack of respect for anyone and anything once they come within ten meters of a ticket booth or anything that requires a ticket or money to be spent. I'M SERIOUS! THERE WAS NO ONE ELSE IN LINE! NOR WAS THERE ANYONE ELSE IN THE ROOM WANTING A TICKET! AND WE STILL HAD HALF AN HOUR BEFORE THE RAFTING WAS TO BEGIN! Yet there she was pushing me out of the way and acting like her plane was rolling down the freaking runway. I gave her a nudge that any AFL player would have been proud of and then gave her a look that would have made Satan himself cower in a dark corner and finally something in her mind clicked and she withdrew and looked around and then said sorry. After I purchased two tickets I stepped aside and allowed her through in a gentlemanly manner. Believe me I nearly gave her a trip that every AFL player would have been proud of! GGGGRRRRRRRRR! So bamboo rafting hey! All this and we still hadn't set foot near the river! After ling up we were finally put onto a raft and there we sat and sat and sat and sat. Other rafts were being filled and taking off down the river but we just sat there whilst the other four people who filled the seats shuffled and bickered and then finally got up and left the raft. It seems one of them wasn't part of them and didn't want to travel alone. Or at least I think that's what happened anyhow. So whilst rafts were being filled and then unfilled and people ran around like complete idiots trying to stay in packs of ten or twelve when each raft could only seat six we were finally put on a raft with four other people where thankfully were all friends and didn't yell at each other or us! I sat back and breathed a sigh of relief. Finally we were on the river and for the next hour we could relax and enjoy the ride. NOT! It seemed that the two raft guys on each raft were either retired taxi drivers or taxi driver 'want to be's' whom didn't pass the taxi licence test and were pissed off at the entire world around them. They yelled across the river at each other and decided to make not only Wuyi Shans roads dangerous but also its river. We were rammed here and there as we raced other rafts for the next 9.5 kilometre down what is known as the 'Nine Bends' section of the river. All around us was some of the most beautiful scenery, but sadly... All around us the tour groups yelled and screamed at each other from raft to raft. All around us the rafts Pole Guys yelled and screamed at each other from raft to raft. All around us the Pole Guys and the Tour Groups all yelled and screamed at each other from raft to raft! By the time we reached the end of the journey I would have been happy to pay another 100 Yuan just to get off the damn raft. I'm sure Rob would have been just as happy to purchase a plane ticket back to Canada! It was probably the worst raft ride I've ever taken and one of the most annoying hours I've had in China. Mainly because we were stuck there and couldn't just walk off or tell them to go away. Thankfully just across from us was the peace and quiet of the beautiful Bonsai Park and the Zhizhi Nunnery where once again I found a complete lack of Nuns. In fact once again there were None Nuns. But this time I forgot to wonder if a Nunn says Nunneigh to her sisters when she goes to sleep. Anyhow, Wuyi Shan hey! Remember, one persons experience is usually not always the next persons experience but for some reason I do believe that the rafting would pretty much be the same on a daily basis. Remember that last time I had none of these hassles and apart from the rafting and the Greedy Noodle Lady both times once within the park, both times my experience has been totally awesome. Wuyi Shan really is a wonderful place packed with beauty and happy and helpful people. It's just a pity that the minority on many occasions can spoil it for the majority in such places. For anyone interested in Fujian's Wuyi Shan here is a link to my page on Wuyi Shans prices; http://www.travelpod.com/travel-blog-entries/eddakath/life_i n_china/1181927160/tpod.html Here is a link to my first day adventures and photos from June 2007 http://www.travelpod.com/travel-blog-entries/eddakath/life_i n_china/1182013680/tpod.html Here is a link to my second day adventures and photos from June 2007 http://www.travelpod.com/travel-blog-entries/eddakath/life_i n_china/1182100260/tpod.html Beers N Noodles toya.....shane _________________________

The soundtrack to this entry was once again Melbourne's Dave Graney The album was 'Heroic Blues' Awesome!

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Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)

Wuyi Shan! A Wonderful Yet Beautiful Hassle

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya, Well what can I say, this week end the Lonely Planet really came to life! In the Wuyi Shan section it states: 'Unfortunately, it's a prime tourist spot and is home to glib-tongued hustlers and would-be guides pursuing tourists.' [/i]</b> After this weekend there has never been a truer word spoken (or as this is a blog and the LP is a book I guess I really should say 'written'!) Strangely, the first time I went to Wuyi Shan, which was with Aussie Martin and Georgia, we were never hassled and no one tried to rip us off. But this weekend it seemed to never stop! All in all though, it was a fantastic time! Canadian Rob and I were lucky enough to be granted a lift to Wuyi Shan with the schools driver and not long after booking in to our happy little hotel we headed around the corner for some noodles at a 'cheap noodle eatery'. When I say a cheap eatery I mean a little Noodle Bar where a large bowl of noodles 'usually' cost around 3 or 4 Yuan. NOT IN WUYI SHAN! After eating Rob went to pay what I thought would be anywhere between 8 and 15 Yuan for two delicious bowls of beef noodles (being a Tourist spot things are usually a little more expensive). Wow, it ended up being so much more. As Rob was paying he handed over 50 Yuan and was given back 18 Yuan. Lucky I was next to him when he was putting the change back into his wallet and I heard him questioning the amount of change. Ohhhh that was it! I was straight back in telling the lady what I thought of her and her business! On the wall it even had the prices; 1 small bowl cost 6 Yuan 1 large bowl coast 8 Yuan Like I said being a major tourist town a normal 4 Yuan large bowl of noodles is usually double the price and as the price is on the wall there really isn't much you can do about it. Even the Chinese have to pay it. Luckily enough my Mandarin is enough to include both prices and personal thoughts on people who try to rip me off. 32 Yuan for two bowls of beef noodles! Needless to say we left with the correct change! We then went to grab a cab so I could take Rob on an awesome walk through the mountains and tea valleys. Of course the cabbie wanted to rob both our graves even before we were in them for a five minute drive. Lucky I knew better than to agree to it! GRRR! The walk I wanted to take Rob on was 'half' my second days walk the last time I visited Wuyi Shan. An absolute stunning walk that took me from the 'Water Curtain Cave down to the Huiwan Temple all the way to the Big Red Robe which is a small Tea House in a tiny valley. From there you join the Red or Yellow Peeked Hatted Tourists and walk through the stunning 'Culture Tourist Route of Wuyi Tea'. It was here in the car park full of Tourist Buses that I thought our walk would finish. I wasn't even going to mention the second half of the walk to Rob but as he seemed to be still in good spirits and full of energy I let him know there was a second half to the walk that most tourists never get to walk. The beginning would be pretty hard on him but at the top of the huge hill he would be greeted with a most awesome view of a Monastery across a tea valley which was all set beneath huge cliffs. Surprise to me, he was sold and without a rest we located the overgrown track which was to take us to Horse Head Rock. After the huge hill! Once he arrived at the top I simply pointed and he kind of stopped and stared for a while. Finally he said, 'well would you look at that!' Or something along that lines! Ha Ha HA! The view of the Monastery beneath the huge cliffs really is simply STUNNING! The rest of the journey was pretty much down hill but very spectacular. We wound our way along tracks that are mainly used by the Wuyi Tea Staff who look after and pick the tea. We passed several of them who were filling their little cane baskets with tea leaves. You can spot these workers in the most amazing places where some cruel person decided to plant a batch of tea trees. Half of the places the trees can be found I would need a mountain goat to help me get to. Finally we made it to the end of the trail where we found a 'very cheap' noodle eatery that served the blandest bowl of noodles I've ever eaten. The lady must have known how bland they were as she kept telling me to put heaps of chili and strangely peanut butter into it. Oh yeah, now that you raised it, 'assumption' hey? I've been told never to assume things but today I assumed that there would be no way in the world Rob would want to do the second half of the walk, especially after I told him about the first hill. Pity, I could have saved us both 150 Yuan on the Park Ticket by entering the park in the small village (the same way we exited it last time) and spent the day walking the reverse of what we did. Remember NOT to assume! It makes an ASS out of U and ME! And it may save you some money whether you're a dumb ass or not! After a few hours rest I met Rob downstairs and we headed out to check out the Wuyi Shan nightlife. We passed about twenty people for the entire night, give or take a few. How strange when there must have been about thirty thousand tourist buses during the day. We passed stalls offering all types of inners and outers along with monkey meat and other assorted 'things'. As Rob is not an adventurous eater we sat for a delicious bowl of Northern Noodles. They really are the best noodles ever! Lanzhou Beef Noodles! Yummy! After dinner we decided on a few games of pool and after being pointed in the right direction by the Northern Noodles Man we walked in that direction. After a quick search we couldn't find anything that looked remotely like a Pool Hall so I went to ask another Noodle Lady and Man where to go. As I don't know the word for Pool/Billiards I simply played Charades and she went 'ohhh' and pointed across the road and to a set of stairs. Well, you would think after three years of playing Charades on an almost daily basis I would get playing a game of Pool right wouldn't you.

What was at the bottom of the stairs you ask? A FREAKIN BROTHEL! Pink lighting filled the room and we were greeted by a lovely young lady. I thought about asking her where the Pool Hall was but then I guessed she would probably make me pay to play Happy Charades with her so sadly I decided against it and we headed back to the Noodle Lady where I once again tried to explain that we didn't want a 'Massage' but to play pool. She then began doing all these strange things with her hands and fists ! I really don't know what her and her husband get up do at night but some of them really were weird! Finally my Pool/Billiards Charades worked and her eyes opened a little wider after she thought about the past five minutes and she happily walked us across to another set of stairs where we found actual pool tables. Sadly there were no beautiful girls on the tables but hey! Here Rob and I spent a few hours happily playing many games, most of which I lost of course and in the end paid the 'Wuyi Shan' price to play pool. For many hours in Shaowu it usually costs around 13 Yuan...a bit under two Aussie Bux. In Wuyi Shan it costs double and a bit more! Unfreakinbelievable! Beers N Noodles toya.....shane __________________________ The soundtrack to this entry was Melbourne's one and only Dave Graney The album was 'The Sexy Swinging Sounds' What a smooth guy!

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Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)

A Non Adventure To Ancient Tainings Beautiful Lake

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya, Over the past nearing a year I've been told by many people about small ancient city near Shaowu. The main thing I've been told about it is that it has a beautiful lake and that I should spend a day there. Over time I forgot about it and a few weeks ago the town name came up in conversation with a friend. I asked if that was the same town that had the 'beautiful lake' and it was. So I decided it was time to take the two hour bus ride and check the lake out for myself. Isn't it funny that over such a long period of time and so many people telling me to go and see this lake that none of us ever disgust the size of the lake. I thought that it would be like 'West Lake' in Hangzhou City where there is a beautiful lake in the middle of the city. I guess everyone thought I knew that it wasn't anything like a beautiful lake in the middle of a city. So without knowledge of the lakes size or any other details of Taining Town, Canadian Jo and I grabbed a local bus and took the two hour journey. When we arrived it was around midday and once we grabbed a map at the dusty little bus station I began searching for the lake. I located the Min River but there were no other blue patches on the map. Luckily for us a man came across to help us and we found out the lake was actually not a beautiful little lake in the little town. It was in fact nearly twenty kilometers away and it was bloody huge and an easy weekends worth of activity so sadly we decided to leave it for another weekend and to simply walk around Taining for the day. It's funny what the Chinese call a 'city'. Everyone I spoke to about the lake called it Taining City. What we actually found was a beautiful small town and like Shaowu built along the banks of the Min River. Shoawu is much more modern with its 'one neon lit' shopping street (which is actually at my front door! Kind of like living just off Sunset Strip....haha! Maybe not!). But both Taining and Shaowu are filled with hidden ancient gems. I don't really know anything about Taining except the fact that it was one of the 24 locations for the Red Guards and that several famous people either came from Taining or trained there for the Red Guard Army. I also know that it is filled with many happy people and that its river banks are much greener and beautiful than Shaowu's. But that may change in the near future.

Half of Shaowu's river banks have been pulled up and are now fenced off and under construction. What the end result will be is anyone's guess. I'm hoping for something green and parky but I have a feeling it will be more of an 'eatery' type result. What ever the result it will be better that before. I am happy that they are leaving the last part of Shaowu's ancient city wall in place along with the beautiful archway. Anyhow, back to Taining! Along the river banks can also be found between 40 and 60 bronze statues telling of life in times long gone along with the last remaining piece of city wall and city gate that once surrounded it. Taining is definitely a tourist town as there is plenty of Tourist Shops running the length of one of its ancient streets. Behind the Tourist Shops can be found ancient homes that I believe must be around three to five hundred years old. Very much like the Ancient Village of Heping I have visited several times. I really don't have much more to write except that we had a wonderful day walking around the streets. There is the 'new section' that reminded both of us very much of like being in Europe but with a Chinese feel about it. Very much built for the tourists who come to visit the towns 'beautiful lake.' Beers N Noodles toya.....shane __________________________ The soundtrack to this entry was Deep Forest The album was their awesome first release.

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Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)

Flippity Flippity Flop, Joyce Ran Up The Clock

Hey Hey and another Big Happy Birthday G'Day toya, If I was Chinese I could happily tell you that it was my second birthday this year but as I'm not Chinese I won't waste my time with such yudda! But as you mentioned 'second' birthday's I might as well continue as you are obviously interested! My beautiful friend Li Ping (Joyce) celebrated her 'second' birthday this year yesterday and did a bloody good job of keeping it quiet until happiness over took her and she was almost running around the streets telling everyone. Well, not really, Rob bumped into her while he was out walking and she quietly mentioned it to him and as Joyce and I were chatting last night she quietly mentioned the fact that she was really happy because it was her birthday. I kind of went...HUH? Didn't we celebrate your birthday on the 6th? Well....yes we did, but today is my 'Lunar Birthday'. Oh, is that right? You Chinese keep that one up your sleeves for extra presents don't you! HUH! Lucky buggers, I guess that's what you get for using two separate calendars! So yesterday was Joyce's REAL BIRTHDAY. As we found out too late (you little bugger!) Rob organised a cake at lunch time and we all gathered in his apartment after school and scoffed down a most excellent birthday cake. HOPE YOU HAD A BEAUTIFUL 'REAL BIRTHDAY' LITTLE FLIP FLOP! Beers N Noodles toya....shane _________________________ The soundtrack to this album was The Black Crowes The album was 'Three Snakes and One Charm'

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Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)

Young Pioneers Day in China

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya, Though today being October 13th is the actual 'Celebration' for Young Pioneers Day here in China all schools obviously had to celebrate it yesterday (Friday, 12th October). It was a day that all students over the past week have been practicing for both during and after school. Though all students have being spending many hours practicing I was more than proud of one group in particular. Many of my Grade 5 students made up the school band for this years celebration. Each night for many weeks they have been.....

.....ANNOYING THE ABSOLUTE SHITE OUT OF EVERYONE WHO EITHER LIVES AT THE SCHOOL OR ANYWHERE AROUND THE AREA! BANG BANG BOOM BOOM TRUMPET TRUMPET BLAST BLAST BOOM BOOM BANG BANG On the afternoon when I would try to get some 'Lesson Stuff' done prior to going for my daily ride I would have to have my iPod up as loud as my little computer speakers could go. I would then have to run around the house closing all my windows and I would still sit cringing at the huge noise blasting through my skull. In the end I would always give in and run down stairs, jump on my bike and make my way out onto the basketball court where the students would be practicing all different things from sports to drums and trumpets. ARGH! But once there, I would always stop for ten minutes to watch them practicing. When they would see me riding across the court they would look over with a huge proud smile and try even harder. So finally the big day came and everyone wore their red scarf with a little extra pride.

All the students were assembled on the sports area and several tables had been set up for the school and city leaders. Speeches were given and whilst I tried my best to hide on the third floor Jo and Rob were found and led to the 'Leaders Table' where everyone from the News Papers to the Television Stations took film and photos of them. A little while later I was spotted taking some happy snaps and was led to the spare seat beside them. BUGGER! Not really, not so bad. The camera's had gone but some of the speeches were still going. Soon the Grade 3 Students were all bought forward and the Grade 4 students proudly exchanged their Green Scarves for Red ones which was their initiation into becoming a Young Pioneer of China. After all the speeches and scarf exchanges the marching band proudly made its way through the crowd. The band was led by one of my favourite students named Eva. If you were to speak to her on the phone you would easily mistake her for a young American. She learned most of her English from tapes and DVD's and when I first met her last December I could have sworn her father must have been American.

I was so happy they got through all their swirls and different formations without any mistakes and I happily ran across to congratulate them afterwards. Most of them couldn't stop smiling. It was such a happy moment for them all! So that was my Young Pioneers Day parade here in Fujian Province. I don't remember celebrating it at all whilst living in Guangxi or Gansu but I do remember that all students wore their Green and Red Scarves. Below you will find the history of Young Pioneers Day. Below that you'll find some photos of my day. Beers N Noodles toya.....shane _________________________ The soundtrack to this entry was 'The Black Crows and Jimmy Page' The album was 'Live At The Greek' Honestly, could you get a better album than that? <u>From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia</u>[/i]</b> The Young Pioneers of China is a mass youth organization for children in the People's Republic of China. The Young Pioneers of China is run by the Communist Youth League, an organization of older youth that comes under the Communist Party of China. The Young Pioneers of China is similar to Pioneer Movements that exist or existed in many Communist countries around the world. <u>HISTORY</u></b> <u> </u></b> The Youth and Children of China Movement was created on October 13, 1949 by the Communist Party of China, and given its present name in June 1953. Between its own founding in 1921 and the founding of the People's Republic in 1949, the Chinese Communist Party ran various other youth movements in communist-held areas. During the Cultural Revolution (1966-1978), the Young Pioneers Movement was defunct. Instead, it was replaced by the Little Red Guards, who were the younger counterparts of the Red Guards, the implementers of the Cultural Revolution. The Young Pioneers Movement was restarted in October 1978. The retrocession of Hong Kong and Macau in 1997 and 1999 respectively has not seen the expansion of Communist Party organizations to those areas, including the Young Pioneers. <u>MEMBERSHIP</u> </b> Young Pioneers consist of children between the ages of six and fourteen; upon reaching the age of fourteen, members automatically exit the Young Pioneers and may go on to join the Communist Youth League. There were an estimated 130 million Young Pioneers in China, as of 2002. [1]

<u>ORGANISATION</u></b> According to the Young Pioneers constitution, each school or village organizes a "large detachment" which is divided into "medium detachments" each corresponding to a class, which is then further divided into "small detachments" each with a handful of members. Each small detachment has a leader and an assistant leader; each medium detachment is led by a committee of between three to seven members; and each large detachment is led by a committee of between seven and fifteen members. Adult leaders are chosen from either the Communist Youth League or from local teaching staff. <u>CONSTITUTION</u></b>

The Constitution was officially passed on June 1, 1954, on international Children's Day. It has since been amended many times. The full text is available on Wikisource. <u>SYMBOLS</u></b> Flag[/i]</b> According to the Young Pioneers Constitution, the flag is red, symbolizing the victory of the Revolution; the five-pointed star in the middle symbolizes the leadership of the Communist Party, while the torch symbolizes brightness down the path of communism. The flag of each large detachment is 90 x 120 cm, while the flag of each medium detachment is 60 x 80 cm, with an isosceles triangle (60 x 20 cm) removed from the right side. The removed triangle corresponds to the red scarf worn by Young Pioneers. Emblem[/i]</b> The emblem consists of the star, the torch, and a banner reading "Young Pioneers of China". Scarf[/i]</b> The red scarf is the only uniform item. Young Pioneers are often referred to simply as "Red Scarves"; the Investiture Ceremony often consists of new members having their scarves tied for them by existing members. Children wearing red scarves are a ubiquitous sight in China. The red scarf is generally worn around the neck and tied, with no woggle. Some local groups also come up with other uniform items. The Young Pioneers Constitution explains that the scarf corresponds to the missing triangle on the medium detachment flag. The Constitution also explains that the red of the scarf comes from the blood sacrificed by martyrs of the Revolution, and that all members should therefore wear the scarf with reverence. Salute, Slogan, Conduct, Promise[/i]</b> The Young Pioneers Salute consists of bending the right arm and raising the right hand directly above the head, the palm flat and facing downwards, and the fingers together. It symbolizes that the interests of the People supersede all. The Slogan is: Translation: "Be prepared, to struggle for the cause of Communism!" To which the reply is: Translation: "Always be prepared!" The stipulated conduct of Young Pioneers, according to the constitution, is: Translation: Honesty, Courage, Vivacity, Unity The Young Pioneers pledge is: Translation: I am a member of the Young Pioneers of China. Under the Pioneers Flag I promise that: I love the Communist Party of China, I love the motherland, I love the people; I will study well and keep myself fit [lit. exercise well], to prepare for: contributing my effort to the cause of communism. <u>THE YOUNG PIONEERS SONG IS: </u> </b> We are the heirs of communism. It was originally the theme song of Heroic Little Eighth-Routers, a 1961 film about the 1958 Second Taiwan Strait Crisis and a real-life group of children who stayed on the frontlines of coastal Fujian in order to help the war effort against Kuomintang forces. The lyrics are:[/i] We are the heirs of communism, Inheriting the glorious tradition of the fore bearers of the Revolution; [To] love the motherland and the people, [While] the crimson red scarf flutters [or waves] at [our] chest. [We] do not fear hardship, nor the enemy, Studying hard and struggling with resolve; Towards victory, [we] courageously advance, Towards victory, [we] courageously advance, Towards victory, [we] courageously advance; We are the heirs of communism. We are the heirs of communism, Along the glorious path of the forebearers of the Revolution; [To] love the motherland and the people, "Young Pioneer Members" is our proud name. Ever be prepared, to contribute [i.e. to the cause], [And] to destroy completely the enemy. For [our] ideal, [we] courageously advance, For [our] ideal, [we] courageously advance, For [our] ideal, [we] courageously advance; We are the heirs of communism.

Young Pioneers Day Parade

Young Pioneers Day Parade


Young Pioneers Day Parade 1

Young Pioneers Day Parade 1


Young Pioneers Day Parade 2

Young Pioneers Day Parade 2


Young Pioneers Day Parade 3

Young Pioneers Day Parade 3


Young Pioneers Day Parade 4

Young Pioneers Day Parade 4


Young Pioneers Day Parade 5

Young Pioneers Day Parade 5


Young Pioneers Day Parade 6

Young Pioneers Day Parade 6


Young Pioneers Day Parade 7

Young Pioneers Day Parade 7


Young Pioneers Day Parade 8

Young Pioneers Day Parade 8


Young Pioneers Day Parade 9

Young Pioneers Day Parade 9


Young Pioneers Day Parade 10

Young Pioneers Day Parade 10


Young Pioneers Day Parade 11

Young Pioneers Day Parade 11


Young Pioneers Day Parade 12

Young Pioneers Day Parade 12


Young Pioneers Day Parade 13

Young Pioneers Day Parade 13


Young Pioneers Day Parade 14

Young Pioneers Day Parade 14

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