A Travellerspoint blog

July 2009

Getting Lost In the Old Streets of Qingdao

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya,

I spent a wonderful day wondering Qingdao’s beautiful little cobble stone streets today.

It did start a little strangely and I wasted a bit of time as I forgot my map and after leaving St Michael’s Church I wondered here and there and stopped for some food and a drink and it was then I realised I had no map and was far from anywhere anyone would want a map so I continued to wonder in the direction I thought the water was in until I found a Chinese tourist crouched over his tourist map and together we realised we were both heading in the wrong direction that we thought we were going.

Oh the hassles of ancient towns with maze like streets and hills!

I was soon back on track and spent the entire day wondering from place to place beneath the most amazing blue sky. I decided to keep away from the foreshore today and stay in the peace and quiet of the back streets. All the sites I say today were beautiful and well worth visiting, I won’t go on about them here as I’ve written about them below.

I have planned to stay here another two nights and then head off inland where it is much less crowded and not as expensive. I have enjoyed my Shandong Adventure but will be glad to leave and pay normal prices for water and food. For breakfast this morning I had Muslim egg and tomato with a small bowl of rice which is usually around 4 Yuan, oh no, this is Shandong they told me and the price here is 10 Yuan. I gave them 5 Yuan and left with them yelling after me. If it was the large bowl it would be worth around 8 Yuan but I asked for the small but it is still egg and tomato and it still costs the same.

Sorry bud, I don’t think so!

All hotel prices will almost double come Saturday but as I want to visit Laoshan so I have agreed (with myself) to pay one night at their stupid rate and then leave the following evening on the night train to Anhui. Qingdao really is such a wonderful city to visit and just like in Yantai and Weihai and anywhere else along the coast, the sea food is so fresh. I still haven’t found where to buy beer by the plastic bag full but I will do my best to hand over a few Yuan for one. I’ve decided not to visit the brewery as I really don’t care how beer is made, I just care if it’s warm or cold. I found an English map and there is a beer street I can visit but I think I’ll pass on that as well and opt for a temple or a shady mountain or two.

So here is my second day here in wonderful Qingdao City!

<u>St Michaels Catholic Church (Tianzhu Jiaotang)</u>

Found just off Zhongshan Lu is the gicantic St Michael’s Catholic Cathedral which was designed by the German architect Arthur Bialucha following Gothic and Roman styles. Its construction began in 1932 and it was finished in 1934 and its design takes the form of a cross. There is a balcony at thirty meters and the front is accompanied by two tall tymmetrical bell towers on each side that house four large bronze bells. The church was badly damaged during the Cultural Revolution but many locals hid the churches crosses in the near by hill therefore saving them for the future.

As usual, being a church it was closed when I arrived but the LP says that you have to actually pay to get inside the church. When I think about it, why not, you have to pay to enter most temples here in China, why not churches too.

<u>Protestant</u><u> Church</u><u> (Jidu Jiaotant)</u>

Found on a busy main road this church was designed by Curt Rothkegel and built in 1908 it looks like an old castle. It is composed of two parts being the actual Church and the Bell Tower. As it is the church that was used by the Germans the locals refer to it as the German Church. It wasn’t opened when I first arrived so I went to visit the observatory and found that was a Military Site so I headed back to the church and a small tour group were being shown in. One guys English was excellent and he had sucha great sense of humor and he gave me his sun glasses and tried to pass me off as Chinese. It must have worked as I wasn’t thrown out by the priest who was having a great time playing along with the game.

<u>Qingdao</u><u> Ying Binguan</u>

Still costing 15Yuan to enter and found on leafy Longshan Lu is the former German governors residence which is a replica of a German Palace. Built in 1903, it is said to have cost 2,450,000 taels of silver to build. When Kaiser Wilhelm II got the bill, he immediately recalled the extravagant governor and sacked him. In 1957 Chairman Mao stayed here with his wife and his kids whilst on holiday and of course there are now signs telling which bedroom the Chairman stayed in. I spent an hour or more visiting the grounds and the house and even sat for a 'spot of tea’ with a friendly Chinese English Teacher from Hunan Province who was here with his family.

<u>TheQingdao</u><u> Arts Museum</u><u></u>

I found this place as I was walking down , I think Daxue Lu (Road) after visiting the Qingdao Ying Binguan. I actually thought it was a temple as it gives that impression both inside the walls and outside but when I got to the ticket office I found that it was actually the Arts Museum and it was well worth the wonderful hour or more that I spent there. It cost 15 Yuan to enter and it is divided into three separate halls but sadly only one of them is open at the moment. All the paintings you see in today’s photos were taken in the Roman Hall which is a three story hall and but the first two levels have show rooms open but what they offer are well worth the entry price.

The other two halls I believe will be dedicated to Buddhist art and Islamic art but both were closed due to either construction or renovations. So the temple photos you see in today’s photos are not actually of a temple, they are actually the beautiful Arts Museum.

<u>Marine</u><u> Life Museum</u><u>, Aquarim and Underwater World</u>

Water here and fish there, here a fish, there a fish, everywhere a fish fish!

Underwater World is very much as awesome as any other Underwater World around the world. They seem to be like McDonalds and no matter where they are they all offer the same things which include the huge whale skeleton in the first or second room. If you like jelly fish then the Aquarium is worth a visit. I love jelly fish so I was squirming with all the kids who were racing around me. As for the live show part of it, you don’t pay any extra but you do get to see a couple of seals and penguins swimming around.

Underwater World cost 90Yuan & the Aquarim costs 40 Yuan. If you want to see both you can get one ticket that costs 120 Yuan.

<u>Huiquan Square</u><u></u>

Huge square full of underground stores and eateries. Here I can actually be found right at this very moment typing this entry. I have just sat with a young girl and her delicious mother and we spent an hour or so going through my photos of Australia. Out side in the food court someone must be strangling a cat as what ever it is surely can’t be called singing. Even the mother was squirming in her seat and giggling at some of the sounds being made.

Why? Why? Why would you put a KTV in a food court? Beers N Noodles toya…..shane

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The soundtrack to this entry was by The Angles The album was the awesome &#8216;No Exit’ ____________________________________________________________

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World


Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Art Museum, Churches &#38;amp; Underwater World

Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)

Qingdaos Beautiful Boardwalk Adventure

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya,

Upon awakening yesterday I knew it was time to depart beautiful Weihai. I felt totally relaxed and that’s a pretty good sign to move on if you ask me.

So after packing I said my sad good byes to the hotel staff and headed out to try my best to catch a bust to the bus or train station which can be found together at the other end of town. I knew Bus Number 10 would get me close but as I was walking the bus I have come to call the Phantom Bus stopped at my side and asked where I was going. Upon hearing my answer the guy said yes so I took the Phantom Bus Number 86 to the Bus/Train Station. Bus 86 is not on any of the bus boards (or not that I came across in my time in Weihai) but you see it wizzing around here and there and it always seems to stop and ask where you want to go. I never really knew where I wanted to go until this one time so I always gave a smile and waved them on their way.

The Weihai Bus and Train station are in the new part of town so unless you want to fork over a heap of money catching a cab maybe catch the Phantom Bus Number 86. I caught it just up from the corner of Shichang Lu and Qingdao Lu as I was walking along Qingdao Lu and it dropped me off right out front.

The ticket to Qingdao was 93 Yuan (for a big bus as it was the next to leave- there are small buses which would be cheaper) and the journey took around four and a half hours to five hours. My bus arrived at a bus station in the north east of the city so I grabbed a cab to the train station area which coast 10 Yuan. While I was trying to figure out where the hell I was in the city several cab drivers gave me a price of 100 Yuan to the train station but I knew that if that’s what they were asking then it had to be a tenth of that.

One I found a few road signs and figured out where I was then I headed to the next main road and flagged a random cab and as we drove past the other cab drivers with a smile I gave them the hand sign for 10 Yuan and waved good bye. My cab diver was such a wonderful guy he spoke little English but I knew enough to get us by and he knew exactly where to take me for the hotel price I was willing to pay.

Zhongshan Lu Mall is the main road that runs through the old part of Qingdao City.

And found just down from the large Mc Donalds sing and down the hilly Tianjin Lu (across Henan Lu) is what I named Sea Food and Beer Square. The square is actually a round-a-bout but all around it are budgetish hotels. I call them budgetish as I’m used to paying rural and inner city prices, but for the coastal area they are budget hotels with out question. Of course they wanted much more than I could pay but after I told them how long I’ve been in China and where I have been living and teaching the price came down to exactly what I was happy to pay on the coast.

I spent the rest of the evening slowly walking around my area and found the famous train station and also found it to be just as beautiful as I have read. This is not your normal Chinese monolith, it is of German architecture and if it was in another city it would stand out like a sore thumb but here it fits in fine. After an hour I headed up to Zhongshan Lu and found that each night from the block past Mc Donald’s it turns into a night market which continues around and onto Jiaohou Lu to where the KFC is,

For those who have heard of the city of Qingdao it will mainly be due to that it was this city that hosted the sailing part of the 2008 Chine Olympics and for those who are planning a trip to China Qingdao is a damn good place to start. Here is the run down the Lonely Planet gives it and I couldn’t agree more;

A breath of fresh air for anyone emerging from China’s polluted urban interior, Qingdao is hardly old school &#8211; parts of the town resemble Bavaria, but its effortless blend of German architecture and modern city planning puts Chinese white tiles towns to shame. Its German legacy more or less intact, Qingdao takes pride in its unique appearance. The Chinese call the town 'China’s Switzerland’. The dilapidated charms of the hilly old town are captivating, so wander at will around the cobbled, higgledy-piggledy alleys, poke around stone clad Teutonic vestiges, guaff the famous local brew (Tsingtao) and ditch the diet, Qingdao has some of the best seafood and kebabs in northern China.

Yes, the old town is exactly where you will want to be located.

Qingdao is surrounded by mountains and the sea and the city can be broken into two. The historic German old town in the west houses the cities unique charms and they are the what most people will be here for. The architectural streetscapes, the train station and a church or two. In the east you will find the modern side of Qingdao where the trendy bars, discos and restaurants are located and somewhere between you will find a bit of both along with some of the cities hilly parks and gardens. Both east and west its southern foreshore offers plentiful beaches in which to spent time dripping and dozing away your tensions and travelling frustrations.

For me, last night as always the first thing is to always get the hand washing out of the way.

So I did what felt like two decades of hand washing before sitting down with my Chinese Qingdao map and my Lonely Planet and transferring everything I needed for the next few days. It sounds like a hard task and sometimes it is but this time it wasn’t so hard as the Chinese Tourist map has pictures of everything the Lonely Planet lists so it was just a case of finding them on the map. I’m sure there will be an English map with it all done for me but I tried everywhere and no one had one. Also one thing I have always found is that the Chinese tourist map always has much more on it so things simply become about circles and a few transferred street names.

Always remember that the writer of the Lonely Planet or what ever guide book you are using usually spends only a few days in the location you are at and from what I’ve found sometimes it seems they have never been there at all. The internet is a wonderful thing but if you are only passing through for a day or two. A seasoned traveller can easily read that the writer gathered their information from a friend or a simple badly translated or placed English map…..but that’s not the case with the writer of the Qingdao LP writer.

The only thing I do wish to add to the LP is that things seem so distant on the map. But everything in the old town really is only a few minutes walk from each other. Both the train station and the beach are less than five minutes walk from where I am staying….Yeah!

<u>SO HERE IS MY SUGGESTION FOR YOUR FIRST DAYS ADVENTURE IN QINGDAO</u>

Do the foreshore walk first and walk from Beach Number Six (Qingdao Bay) to Fushan Bay. It is a beautiful walk and you can take in some of the main sites along the way.

<u>QINGDOA</u><u> BAY</u><u> AND BATHING BEACH NUMBER 6</u>

<u>The Coastal Boardwalk</u>

The seaside or foreshore boardwalk really is awesome. It stretches from Tuandao Bay in the west and runs all the way to Shilaoren Tourist Resort in the east, which is a huge forty kilometers and along the way it takes you through all the different parts of the city ie: the old section and of course the new section. I spent a wonderful day walking from the Local Ferry Station which is located in Jiaozhou Bay and then around Tuandao Bay to the Royal Club building (maybe supposed to resemble Sydneys Opera House but doesn’t &#8211; at the end of the night market area) and I slowly made my way around, Qingdao Bay, Huiquan Bay, Taiping Bay and all the way around Fushan Bay to just past the Music Square.

Here can be found the Qingdao Olympic Sailing Center. It’s a long walk but it really is beautiful!

<u>QINGDAO</u><u> BAY</u><u> & BEACH NUMBER 6</u>

<u>The NightMarket </u>

Each night as light leaves Qindao Bay magical lights seem to appear along the western side of Qingdao Bay. Along Taiping Lu you will find the cities night market. But before you get there sit and watch as those who run the little footpath stalls play cat and mouse with the Police. They only have a blanket to put their wares on and once the Police arrive they simply make it into a sack, throw it on their back and run as fast as they can in the opposite direction. The Police then leave and everyone returns and unpacks again and stands ready for the next time. At the main night market you have stalls and lights and it is pretty cool and it sells all the normal stuff along with what you would expect from a sea side night market ie: seafood bbq, fake pearls, shells, dried fish and of course swords.

Everyone needs a sword, even those who live by the sea need a sword!

<u>Zhanqiao Pier (Huilan Pavilion)</u>

Zhanqiao Pier is supposedly one of the distinguished buildings of Qingdao. It has been thrown into Qingdao’s top ten due to its eight sided &#8216;Flying Pavillion’ (the Huilan Pavilion). It cost 15 Yuan to enter but I didn’t bother as I was having enough people problems just on the pier. If you don’t like crowds then past it by as it looks just as good from the shore.

<u>Tianhou (Mazu) Temple</u>

This small temple is dedicated to Tianhou (Heaven Queen), Goddess of the Sea and protector of sailors. She is also known as Mazu and Niangniang and if you want to more about Mazu then CLICK HERE as I added a bit on it when I wrote about my visit to the one in Yantai. Yantai’s temple is much more beautiful and has around one hundred thousand less people inside it each day. Here I also had people problems and felt that unless you were in a tour group then you were very much pushed to the back or simply just told to move to make way for the crowds with the flags. But after four and a half years I’m getting pretty god at telling people to stick it and push them back to where they were a moment ago to then smile at them and offer them my position once I have finished. The temple itself is very small yet beautiful. The main hall contains a colourful statue of Tianhou, flanked by two other figures and a pair of fearsome guardians. Other halls include the Dragon King Hall where in front of the Dragon King lies a splayed pig and a shrine to the God of Wealth.

<u>The Qingdao Navy Museum</u>

Not being an armed forces freak in ay way I never bothered visiting this museum but if you are a military fan and in the area of the lighthouse or between Beach Number 6 & 1 then I think for around 120Yuan you can spend an hour or two here. I believe you can also buy separate tickets for different things like the submarine or the war ships, which you can also see from the walk to the lighthouse.

<u>The Little Qingdao Lighthouse (next to Lu Xun Park)</u>

From the LP;

Poking out like a lollipop into Qingdao Bay south of Bathing Beach Number 6 and dominated by its German built lighthouse, the Little Qingdao peninsula is excellent for throwing off the crowds battling it out on the beaches. Despite the name &#8216;Little Green Island’ it is actually a peninsula, lashed to the shore by a slender sandbar (called Qinyu Lu). I grabbed a ticket for 15 Yuan and spent half an hour or so relaxing here. You can’t actually visit the light house but there are very few people here so it is a nice place to sit and watch the boats go by.

<u>HUIQUAN</u><u> BAY</u><u> & BEACH NUMBER 1</u>

<u>Lu Xun Park (next to the Lighthouse)</u>

Lu Xun park was established in 1929 and originally named Seaside Park as it follows the natural coastal terrain. Its designer was Ge Jingying who was a famous Chinese horticulturist. in 1950 the parks name was changed, but strangely no to its designer, it was changed to that of a Chinese writer.

<u>Marine</u><u> Life Museum</u><u>, Aquarim and Underwater World</u>

I didn’t visit any of the above on this day but I did return the following day and found Underwater World to be just as awesome as any other Underwater World around the world. They seem to be like McDonalds and no matter where they are they all offer the same things which include the huge whale skeleton in the first or second room. If you like jelly fish then the Aquarium is worth a visit. I love jelly fish so I was squirming with all the kids who were racing around me. As for the live show part of it, you don’t pay any extra but you do get to see a couple of seals and penguins swimming around.

Underwater World cost 90Yuan & the Aquarim costs 40 Yuan. If you want to see both you can get one ticket that costs 120 Yuan.

<u>Huiquan Square</u><u></u>

Huge square full of underground stores and eateries.

<u>TAIPING</u><u> BAY</u><u> & BEACH NUMBER 2</u>

<u>Huashi Lu House</u>

From the LP; formerly the residence of a Russian aristocrat, and later the German governors retreat for fishing and hunting. The Chinese call it the &#8216;Chiang Kaishek Building’ as the generalissimo secretly stayed here in 1947. It looks a treat from the beach but when I got to the ticket office (6 Yuan) there were several tour groups waiting to pile in so I headed back to the beach instead. <u> FUSHAN</u><u> BAY</u><u> AND BATHING BEACH NUMBER 3</u>

<u>Qingdao</u><u> Sculpture Park</u><u></u>

It has the theme of the Chinese Civilization and Oceanic Culture in mind and shows four different kinds of sculptures which are landmark sculptures, thematic sculptures, celebrity sculptures and miniature sculptures. Drop in as you are walking past anyhow. Plus its free!

<u>Qingdao Music Square</u><u></u>

The music square is situated at the west of May 4th Square and covers an area of 36,000 m2. It is divided into five parts; the greenbelt of trees, the soft sculptures, the elliptical square, the musical sea viewing platform and the underground amusement area.

<u>May Fourth Square</u>

The May Fourth Square gets its name from the May the Fourth Movement. It is a square with a contemporary style and in the center is a huge round shaped sculpture made of rings that have been unevenly placed on top of each other which is known as the &#8216;May Breeze’. Here you will find the skies filled with kites of all shapes and sizes along with parents relaxing while their kids race around dodging all the kite strings.

<u>THE QINGDAO OLYMPIC SAILING CENTER, YAN’ERDA ISLAND & BEACH NUMBER 3</u>

Built for the Olympics and now home of the expensive sailing club. If you are an Olympics person you can do a tour of the area but I have no idea what the cost is. By now I had had enough of the crowds and Xianggang Road where you can catch many different buses that will take you all the way back to Qingdao Bay and the train station area. I caught bus 321 and headed back to spend an hour or so in the night market and then headed to KFC for an elcheapo coffee and to begin this blog.

All in all it really was a beautiful day spent entirely along the foreshore and I think it would have to cover more than half of the entire 40 km boardwalk. I was so jealous of all the bike riders who were wizzing by me, most of whom where dodging the foreshore police who were also on bikes but it seems only the elderly listened to them. I would have loved to have completed the rest of the journey as I believe the rest of it would be clear of crowds. At the end is what is known as the &#8216;Old Stone Man’.

Who he is or what he is I guess I will never know. Beers N Noodles toya…..shane

PS: for a little bit of information on Qingdao continue to read below. PSS: ALL PHOTOS CAN BE FOUND BELOW ALL THE TEXT

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The soundtrack to this entry was by Faith No More The album was &#8216;This is it, The Best Of’ ____________________________________________________________

Qingdao (TsingTao) is a picturesque coastal city that lies on the southern tip of China's Shandong Peninsula, located in JiaoZhou Bay facing the Yellow Sea. Qingdao, with an annual average temperature of 12.2&deg;C, is also a well-known holiday resort in China. The city has seven urban districts and five county level cities under its jurisdiction with an area of 10,645 square kilometers and a population of more than 8.1 million. Before troops were garrisoned here by the imperial court of Qing in 1891, Qingdao had been a small fishing village. It became a German concession in 1897 and was occupied by invading Japanese soldiers when the First World War broke out in 1914. The famous May 4th Movement was launched in 1919 and protestors, against the then Chinese government yielding to Japanese pressure, demanded the recommencement of sovereignty over Qingdao.

The city reverted to Chinese rule in 1922, but was occupied by Japan again during the Second World War. After World War II Qingdao served as the headquarters of the Western Pacific Fleet of the US Navy.

The USS Alaska, allowed by the KMT, occupied Tsingtao, China in October 1945. On June 2nd, 1949, the CCP's Red Army entered Qingdao City; Shandong and Qingdao's municipalities have been under PRC control since that time. As one of China's most important independent coastal cities with state planning and budgeting powers including provincial power in economic management, the city has recently experienced rapid growth. A new central business district (CBD) created near the Qingdao International Marina & Water Sports Center, east of May 4th Square and the city government building, is Shandong's costal business Mecca.

Its major industries include trade, light industry, tourism and oceanography research. Qingdao is well known for its european architecture and attractive coastal landscape. With its abundance of natural beauty and growing human resources, the year-round schedule of tourist attractions and events, coupled with numerous tourist facilities as well as an extensive public transportation network, make Qingdao an ideal tourist destination both at home and abroad.

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure


Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Qingdao Foreshore Boardwalk Adventure

Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)

Beautiful Foreshore Gardens & No Sand Castles

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya,

This morning I woke feeling very VERY under the weather!

The side effects of what was a great night at the night market last night with several tables of people and far too much seafood and beer. I had such a great evening and thankfully most of the people knew a lot of English which made things so much better. Most of them work in import/export business and though they use their English often they actually never get to use it in such a relaxed manner so for most it was a new experience and one that caused great uproar around us.

I can’t say that I have laughed so hard in the past year.

The night shots on this page ware of the first group of people that came over to sit with me. My phone/camera battery died soon after as it had been used all yesterday on Luigong Island. Some of them stayed until stumps and others came and went but all in all it was a night that I needed very much left me in great spirits all through today’s adventure.

As I found a map last night that is in both English and Chinese my plan today was to head to the lighthouse on Jinxianding Mountain and then along the foreshore for as far as my feet would take me, so that’s exactly what I did. When I arrived at the small mountain as hard as I tried I couldn’t find a thing. I took a couple of small roads and then headed to the end of Jinxianding Road to the small navy port but there was no lighthouse to be found. I then asked some locals who all seemed rather confused with the map and they all told me there was no lighthouse on the small hill.

In the end I gave in and continued my foreshore walk along Haibin Road. I had to use the actual road as at the moment the foreshore is a complete mess and construction site.

When I arrived at Weihai Park I once again found myself walking through beautiful foreshore parks. It was here that I spotted the lighthouse which was across the other side of the beach at Yuehai Park. Either it has been moved or they put it in the wrong park when they created the map. I’m kind of thinking they got it wrong when printing the map as moving a lighthouse would be a huge job. Around Weihai Park there are so many new apartment buildings being built and these ones won’t come cheap when they are finally put on the market. When I rounded the far corner of the park I came to Yangjia Bay which held a surprising sight. At its far end there was a large bridge that looked very out of place due to the tide being out. I would love to have arrived many hours before and seen it with the tide in with small gentle waves lapping at its feet.

Oh well, can’t have everything!

I spent an hour here resting my feet and watching the sun go down and as quickly as the street lights came on my stomach came alive and I realised how hungry I was. In my eagerness to head out find a new adventure I had actually forgotten to eat. My hunger was ferocious and as I had noticed several Bus Number 10’s whizzing up and down Haibin Road I decided that it was the bus for me and thankfully it was.

You can catch Bus Number 10 from near the Happiness Arch all the way to Yangjia Bay. My walk today was surprisingly full of beauty.

The park actually runs all the way along the beach and it took me around three and a half hours to walk from the Happiness Arch to Yangjia Bay. It can be done in a much quicker time but I was taking photos and stopping to have a look at the many statues and sculptures that are found along the way. Today I realised something so simple yet it is so strange. I remember seeing it in Baihai (Guangxi Province) back in 2006 or when ever it was but it didn’t click then but after being in Yantai, Penglai and here in Weihai I realised that it was a reality.

What am I jibbering on about you ask?

In the west when children (and big children like me) are at the beach we make actual sand CASTLES because that is our history and what can be found in England and all throughout Europe. I had never stopped to question what Chinese children make at the beach but over the past week or so I have found out. They don’t make sand castles they actually make sand ancient walled cities and towns like Xian or Kaifeng or Pingyao. I have been walking past these sandy structures each day and it wasn’t until today that I realised what they were and when the penny dropped I actually stopped in amazement.

History and culture also play apart in something as simple as what our children build on the beach!

But it is not until you actually think about it that it makes sense. I bet if you ask your buddy if Chinese children build sand CASTLES on the beach he or she will answer yes! But yes is not correct because they build sand Ancient Walled Cities. I actually asked two young kids what it was they were building but I couldn’t understand their answer but when I mentioned Xi’an city they laughed and said yes.

Why in the world did I ever think that children all over the world built sand castles!

For those that find them selves in this part of Shandong Province I really would recommend passing by time in Yantai and spending your time in Penglai and Weihai. After spending several days here in Weihai I would easily put it near the top of my list of favourite cities in China. Nothing is overpriced and not once have I been treated as a cash cow like in Yantai. The city is clean and tidy and everyone uses the bins that are provided. There are English signs everywhere and the people are so friendly, curious and laidback.

They are so proud of their city and have every right to be. So Weihai, do it, pack and get gone! Beers N Noodles toya…..shane ___________________________________________________________

The soundtrack to this entry was by Buffalo Tom The album was 'Sleepy Eyed’ ____________________________________________________________

Weihai  Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk

Weihai Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk


Weihai  Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk

Weihai Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk


Weihai  Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk

Weihai Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk


Weihai  Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk

Weihai Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk


Weihai  Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk

Weihai Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk


Weihai  Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk

Weihai Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk


Weihai  Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk

Weihai Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk


Weihai  Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk

Weihai Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk


Weihai  Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk

Weihai Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk


Weihai  Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk

Weihai Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk


Weihai  Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk

Weihai Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk


Weihai  Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk

Weihai Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk


Weihai  Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk

Weihai Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk


Weihai  Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk

Weihai Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk


Weihai  Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk

Weihai Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk


Weihai  Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk

Weihai Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk


Weihai  Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk

Weihai Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk


Weihai  Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk

Weihai Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk


Weihai  Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk

Weihai Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk


Weihai  Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk

Weihai Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk


Weihai  Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk

Weihai Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk


Weihai  Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk

Weihai Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk


Weihai  Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk

Weihai Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk


Weihai  Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk

Weihai Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk


Weihai  Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk

Weihai Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk


Weihai  Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk

Weihai Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk


Weihai  Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk

Weihai Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk


Weihai  Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk

Weihai Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk


Weihai  Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk

Weihai Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk


Weihai  Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk

Weihai Lighthouse &#38;amp; Foreshore Walk

Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)

Luigong Dao & The Sino-Japanese War Museum

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Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya,

Today I had a massive history lesson, but then when isn’t any given day in the country that has the worlds longest continues civilization a history lesson. Living here for so long I know a lot about the tensions and hatred that the Japanese and the Chinese share but today I found a new reason. Well it wasn’t entirely new to me but I can’t say I had ever studied it in any detail.

One of the reasons I wanted to come to Weihai (besides the beaches and bikini clad Chinese beauties) was the Museum of the 1894 &#8211; 1895 Sino-Japanese War during which China suffered a most humiliating naval defeat. Even though they were armed with the latest European warships, the entire Qing Navy was annihilated by a much smaller Japanese Navy.

So I rose early and headed across to the Tourist Wharf at the northern end of the Happy Park that runs along North Haibin Road. There are now several tickets to choose from and they are much more expensive than those that were around when my Lonely Planet was written. Since then both Weihai and Liugong Island have had massive surges in both tourists and money spent on tourism by the government.

The Chinese government are fully aware that you must spend to then receive.

Ticket 1: 110 Yuan which covers the ferry ride to and from the island and several entry fees. Ticket 2: 160 Yuan which covers the ferry ride to and from the island, several entry fees and cable car. Ticket 3: 210 Yuan which covers the ferry ride to and from the island, several entry fees, cable car and a trip around the entire island in a luxury tourist ferry.

I chose Ticket Number 1 as I was told by a bikini clad beauty that if I was to get off the ferry and head left until I got to the stairs that took me to the memorial statue then it was an easy climb both to the memorial statue and then to the gunnery at the top of the mountain near the cable car. She was right on all things and the views at the top were as beautiful as she was.

The Sino-Japanese War Museum was more than worth the ticket price and all of its audio and visual displays are awesome and some border or stunning even though they are simple paintings with flashing lights. I spent around an hour to an hour and a half wandering its two floors and left with a much greater understanding of what it was all about yet of course I still question some of the biased statements made on behalf of the Chinese but, after all it is their museum.

If it was the a Japanese museum it would be empty with a sign at the door saying; It never happened and we didn’t do anything. We never went to China in 1895!

The rest of the island can be described by the lonely planet; Luigong Island lies two kilometers off the coast in the Weihai Gulf. The island was established as a stronghold during the Ming Dynasty to guard against Japanese pirates. Later the Qing government made it their naval base and after their crushing defeat at the hands of the Japanese the island was occupied by the Japanese army for three years. In 1898 the British wrested control of the area and governed it for thirty two years. During this time they built schools, churches and even teahouses, transforming the island into a summer resort for the British Navy. In 1948 Chiang Kaishek and his troops arrived, shortly after by the communists.

I’ve added a heap of information I found on Wikipedia as the island does have a very interesting history and one worthy of a few minutes of your time.

Beers N Noodles toya…..shane PS: More information on Luigong Dao can be found beneath the photos below. _______________________________________________________________________________

The soundtrack to this entry was by, what I believe was one of THE best bands ever formed. The awesome Buffalo Tom. The album was 'Big Red Letter Day’. ________________________________________________________________________________

Liugong Island is located about four kilometers across Weihai Bay from the city of Weihai.

It has an area 3.15 square kilometers, with a maximum length of 4.08 kilometers (in east-western direction) and a maximum width of 1.5 kilometers. The coastline has a total length of 14.93 kilometers. In general, the terrain of the island slopes down from the north to the south. Qiding Mountain, is the highest point of the island and its northern slope is made up of cliffs and the southern side of the hill is much more gentle.

More than half the of island's area (about 1.8 square kilometers) is covered by forest, predominantly consisting of black pine trees.

Archaeological evidence suggests that the island has been inhabited at least from the Warring States Period onwards. During the Han Dynasty (206BC to AD220), the island was settled by members of the Liu family which resulted in the present-day name.

The use of the island was subject to several changes during the Ming Dynasty: At first, all inhabitants left the island because of pirate threats. During the reign of the Jiajing Emperor, a rebel force led by Xian Wang sought refuge on the island, but the rebellion was put down shortly thereafter. Towards the end of the reign of the Wanli Emperor, settlers were recruited to re-cultivate the island. They were guarded against pirate attacks by a detachment of troops. Subsequently, a rise in shipping activities between the north and the south of China brought prosperity and an increase in population to the island. In 1663, the island's population was evacuated yet again, this time in response to the outbreak of an epidemic. Twenty seven years later, in 1690, the island was resettled by three families (Cong, Zou, and Jiang). In 1703, the island was chosen as the base for another rebel force, but again the rebellion was short-lived.

During the reign of the Guangxu Emperor, the Beiyang Fleet was founded as China's first modern navy and a telegraph center, a naval academy, and the headquarter of the Beiyang Naval Units were set up on Liugong Island. This resulted in the construction of many facilities and an increase in the island's population. Eight out of fifteen modern warships which were bought from the United Kingdom and Germany where assigned to the Beiyang Fleet. On September 14, 1888, Ding Ruchang was given the command of the Beiyang Fleet. From 1887 onwards, more than one hundred cannons were setup up around the harbor of Weihai as well as on the islands of Liugong and Ri.

Eventually, Ding Ruchang made Liugong Island his official residence.

A t-shaped dock, known as the "iron dock" was constructed in the years 1889 to 1891.

During the First Sino-Japanese War, the Beiyang Fleet suffered a crushing defeat and in the spring of 1895, the island was occupied by Japanese forces during which Ding Ruchang committed suicide. The Japanese occupation lasted for only three years. In 1898, the United Kingdom bought the island (along with the rest of Weihaiwei) from the Japanese and agreed to hand it back to China after twenty five years of use (or when the Russians left the nearby Port Arthur).

Local Chinese were recruited into a British regiment but the island was not fortified.

The Royal Navy established a base on Liugong Island occupying and extending the existing facilities.

Residences, hospitals, churches, tea houses, a sport ground, a post office and navy cemeteries were constructed as part of the British development of the area. When the Russians left Port Arthur in 1905, the terms of the lease meant Britain should return the island to China. Britain re-negotiated the lease with the Chinese to counter a new German presence in the area. Weihaiwei was returned to the Republic of China in 1930 after which it was a special administrative region. The Chinese government allowed the Royal Navy to continue to use the naval base for another ten years but this was cut short when Japan invaded in 1938.

From 1949 to the present day the island has been occupied by the People's Liberation Army.

Why is it called Liugong Island?

According to the legends, there are two very different explanations.

The simple one tells that a tribe belonging the imperial family sharing the family name Liu came to the island The second version belongs more to a mythological tale. Legend tells of Liugong (Grandpa Liu) and Liumu (Granny Liu) and I will leave it as I found it.

Once upon the time, a commercial boat going from the south to north was struck by a storm on the sea and missed their routes. After many days of wandering, the food and fresh water were almost used up. At the brink of complete despair, a sailor found at night a dot of fire in the distance. He then shouted excited to all the others:"We are saved! We are saved!" This slightest gleam of hope encouraged all the people onboard.

They tried their best to row the boat, and eventually they reached an island, on the beach of which stood an old man, who was holding a torch guiding them. After the boat ran aground, all the people jumped down onto the shore, and rushed to the beach. After that, they all lay on the sand beach and fainted. The old man carried one after another into his hut. Later when they came round, the old said,"My family name is Liu, you can call me Liugong (Mr. Liu or Grandpa Liu)." The old man's wife, granny Liu, was also a kind person. She put a handful of rice into the pot and began to cook for them. A moment later, the diner is ready. But the people were amazed when they found that they could not finish the food cooked with only a handful of rice. Then they realized that both the old man and the old woman are immortals, and kneeled down to thank them for saving their lives.

But they found the two persons disappeared when they looked up.

On the next day, the learned from the inhabitants on the island that Liugong and Liumu often do such kind of good deeds. In order to show their thankfulness towards Liugong and Liumu, they built a temple on the island for them, and named the island Liugong Dao Island.

Liugong Dao Adventure

Liugong Dao Adventure


Liugong Dao Adventure

Liugong Dao Adventure


Liugong Dao Adventure

Liugong Dao Adventure


Liugong Dao Adventure

Liugong Dao Adventure


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Liugong Dao Adventure

Liugong Dao Adventure


Liugong Dao Adventure

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Liugong Dao Adventure

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Liugong Dao Adventure


Liugong Dao Adventure

Liugong Dao Adventure


Liugong Dao Adventure

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Liugong Dao Adventure

Liugong Dao Adventure


Liugong Dao Adventure

Liugong Dao Adventure


Liugong Dao Adventure

Liugong Dao Adventure


Liugong Dao Adventure

Liugong Dao Adventure


Liugong Dao Adventure

Liugong Dao Adventure


Liugong Dao Adventure

Liugong Dao Adventure


Liugong Dao Adventure

Liugong Dao Adventure


Liugong Dao Adventure

Liugong Dao Adventure


Liugong Dao Adventure

Liugong Dao Adventure


Liugong Dao Adventure

Liugong Dao Adventure


Liugong Dao Adventure

Liugong Dao Adventure


Liugong Dao Adventure

Liugong Dao Adventure


Liugong Dao Adventure

Liugong Dao Adventure


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Liugong Dao Adventure


Liugong Dao Adventure

Liugong Dao Adventure


Liugong Dao Adventure

Liugong Dao Adventure


Liugong Dao Adventure

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Liugong Dao Adventure

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Liugong Dao Adventure

Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)

The Gift That Is Given & a New Beach To Play

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya,

Argh it’s a dogs life! Another day, another beach on which to play!

This evening finds my very tired and sore feet in the small coastal city of Weihai and what a beautiful leafy green city it is. Located at the eastern tip of Shandong Peninsula, Weihai lies across from both South Korea and Japan. It is a well known port and tourist city and has been honored as "The garden city" of China. It is about 60kms from Yantai and it is the site of China’s most humiliating naval defeat when the entire Qing Navy (armed with advanced European warships) was annihilated by a much smaller Japanese fleet in 1895.

Sadly Luo Wei and I said good bye yesterday morning as she left Yantai and caught the train home to Kaifeng city to be with her mother for a few days before then heading back to Xian city to begin work.

It is doubtful we will see each other until at least October. There is much more I can say as there is more to it than I willing to write about just yet.

I spent a sad day yesterday full of self pity resting and reading in bed as it was hot and overcast outside and I wasn’t in much of a mood for crowds and being overcharged. Last night I ventured out into the glitzy streets of Yantai and spent hours window shopping in the Shopping District along Nan Dajie. On the way back to the hotel I stopped for some bbq sticks and a few too many beers to lighten my self pity and my dark mood.

This morning when I woke I thought it best to head somewhere new and to find a place in which to find my own sandy smiles. So I headed to the Long Distance Bus Station (no buses from the Beima Lu bus station go to Weihai) and grabbed a bus to Weihai city (ticket cost 30 Yuan). The journey took around two hours during which I dozed and listen to my MP3. As we arrived in Weihai city the guy next to me began talking to me and surprise to me his English was awesome. His name was Gavin and he is a sales engineer for a company called Trelleborg (Marine Systems). His card is in Chinese on one side and English on the other and I can’t say I’ve seen that before in the past four and a half years I’ve been in China.

It is but a simple thing but I found it gave me the comfort that I needed right there and then. Gavin was just the person I needed to meet.

We have all gone through times when things have become so confusing that our pathway in life has become overgrown with weeds overnight and it is during these times that life places before us someone who allows the light to shine again and that’s who Gavin was for me this morning. Over the past few weeks in Shandong, due to being a foreigner I have been constantly robbed by the tourist industry and there has been nothing I could do about it. Either you pay or you go without a hotel, food and water. I have wanted to travel around Shandong for some time but what I found was not what I expected mainly due to the angelic write ups most travel sites give this province.

Add to that Luo Wei’s departure and the unknown future we have together. You then have one hell of a sad confused and messed up mind.

So I guess you could say that I can never thank Gavin enough for that one simple little gift he offered me this day. I needed some of the comforts of home. I needed the cleanliness, the solitude, the quite and the respect of all those staying here to keep it that way. I usually stay in the cheapest of the cheap hotels when I travel thus to allow me to continue to travel as accommodation eats up most of a travelers budget but this one night, this very one night I needed to feel like I was with my family and friends and it was given to me by a complete stranger.

So I can guess that you have an understanding of what is happening at this point of time.

For two years she has been a constant smile in the blog you have been reading and apart of, but due to family commitments and the simple life that it requires it is doubtful that that beautiful smile will be apart of my future blogs and life. Right now life is not where I thought it would be and weeds are growing on my pathway where I never anticipated they would be. The future I had created in my mind has been erased and changed in a way I never expected. But life, no matter what it throws our way it continues its own adventure and either we are willing participants or non willing participants, it will no matter what we expect, it will continue with our without us.

I for one am a willing participant. I shall hold my head up high and place one foot before the other and walk into the future. It is in no way not the future I expected it to be but it is a future that is expected of me.

After Luo Wei’s departure I swore to myself that I would leave Shandong after my visit to Weihai and head back down south to where I know I will find respect and comforting smiles but this morning a simple man changed all that with his willingness to help and his genuine friendliness. After we departed the bus and as we were getting along so well we decided to stay in the same hotel, well that was until we arrived at the hotel and I found out it was well out of my budget.

It seems there was an easy answer. He was willing to put half my room cost into his company card. With a smile he very much said, 'There, it is now well within your budget!’

What could I say but a huge thank you and as he is from Qindao we are hoping to meet for a beer or three when I get there maybe next week sometime. Tomorrow I will have to leave the comforts of this beautiful &#8216;Home Inn’ and find a new hotel to stay in, which of course will not be as clean and will be much further away from the foreshore than this one. After lunch Gavin headed out to go about his afternoon at work and I decided to hit the foreshore which I was told was about a kilometer or less directly east down Shichang Road.

As I didn’t have a map I decided to spend the day walking and getting lost along the way. Then later in the evening do my best to find my way home.

<u>The Weihai Happiness Arch and The Happy Foreshore Park</u>

At the end of Shichang Road I found what is known as the Happiness Arch which is a thirteen storey glass arch way that over looks the bay and Liugong Dao (Dao means Island). The arch costs 18Yuan to take the lift to the top where it offers beautiful views of the bay (east) and the city (west) but sadly not the beach side parks to either side of it. I then spent most of the afternoon walking to the end of the southern foreshore park and then back tracking until I returned to the Happiness Arch after which I walked to the end of the northern foreshore park. The foreshore parks are so beautiful and full of lush green grass and trees under which can be found many couples dedicating their love to each other (through laughter and conversation). The other thing I really loved about the park were the statues and I was so happy to find that they were of both eastern and western inventers, musicians and thinkers.

The end of the western foreshore park is where I found the ferry terminal to Liugong Dao (Island). I decided to wait until tomorrow to visit the island due to cost and time.

The rest of the afternoon and early evening I slowly made my way past the Naval Bases until I reached the end of the bay. Not a walk I’d advise others to do mainly as all the good beaches and views are blocked by the many different Naval Bases. At the end of the bay I did find a small beach where hundreds of fishing boats were docked for the day awaiting nightfall before heading out to sea. While walking I had noticed Bus Number 84 passing by in both directions so to save my feet I decided to grab the bus back into the city where I ended up on Xinwei Lu which is a main shopping street in the city. I spent a few hours crossing between Winwei Lu and Tongyi Lu in the direction of my hotel and how happy was I when I came across a vibrant market street filled to the brim with stalls full of offerings along with bbq stalls.

<u>Dangcheng BBQ & Market Street</u>

I decided to take a seat and ordered a plate of bbq sticks and a jug full of beer from the keg.

Due to Qingdao city being so close (home of China’s largest brewery) all of these small coastal towns are full of kegs. Anywhere there is a free space during the daylight hours, night time finds it filled with tables and chairs where there will be several bbq stalls with many beer kegs stacked beside them. Here both locals and tourists can be found munching and drinking themselves into happiness as the beer is plentiful and both the beer and the bbq is very cheap. There are so many kegs here, in Yantai and Penglai that I have walked past many Simple Beer Sellers. I call them this because they place themselves between the bbq corners and all they have is one keg, a light and a bag of plastic cups and they have crowds of people around them all guzzling down one beer and then moving onto their next destination.

In the west we seriously have too many rules and regulations that come between us and our happiness!

No visit to Weihai would be complete without a beer at the Dangcheng BBQ and Market street and this vibrant street can be found on Dangcheng Street which runs between Heping Road and Shichang Road and it is well worth a visit on a warm summers evening.

Beers N Noodles toya…..shane

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The soundtrack to this entry was by Slayer. The album was the awesomely powerful &#8216;South of Heaven’ ____________________________________________________________

Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk

Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk


Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk

Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk


Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk

Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk


Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk

Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk


Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk

Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk


Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk

Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk


Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk

Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk


Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk

Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk


Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk

Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk


Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk

Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk


Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk

Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk


Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk

Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk


Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk

Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk


Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk

Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk


Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk

Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk


Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk

Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk


Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk

Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk


Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk

Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk


Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk

Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk


Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk

Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk


Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk

Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk


Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk

Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk


Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk

Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk


Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk

Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk


Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk

Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk


Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk

Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk


Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk

Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk


Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk

Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk


Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk

Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk


Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk

Weihai Foreshore &#38;amp; City Walk

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