A Travellerspoint blog

April 2009

My Chopsticks Will Fly in a Furious Frenzy

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya, Stolen bikes hey! We'll get to stolen bikes soon! I actually had the most wonderful day today which began with the movie 'Inkheart' which I thought was the most wonderful adventure and I wished that it never had to end. Sadly though all good things do have to come to an end and as it was such a beautiful movie I thought that a many hour ride in search of new villages would be the perfect adventure for me. On my bus journeys too and from Xian I have noticed a building on top of the last hill that the freeway goes though just before the Shangzhou City exit so I thought I'd slowly make my way to this hill through the villages that can be seen from the new freeway and the bus window as we fly by. When you look at the photos at the bottom of the page my city is actually on the other side of the mountains you can see in these photos. This link will take you to the top of one of the mountains on another temple adventure I took last year during which I took photos of my city. Like most of my village rides there were kids running everywhere and soon enough I had a few chasing after me. I stopped, got us all a coke each and after a short chat I was slowly making my way through villages full of beautiful white houses that made me almost feel like I was back in the Zhouzhuang Smurf Water Village, but with out the canals of course. After several hours I finally made it as far as I could go and then had to find a way up the hill. On the way up I came across, or should I say surprised the absolute hell out of the monk that was supposed to be gardening but was more like far far away in dream land as he stared off in to the distance. He looked so relaxed and far away, almost like he'd found his Nirvana so I tried not to bother him but as it was a dirt track a few stones clanged together and he came back to life with a bang and I'm sure he nearly chopped his own foot off in fright when he saw me struggling away up the road next to him. A few seconds later he was slapping his knees in fits of laughter. I know I look strange and all but I didn't know I looked 'that strange'. I spent the next hour walking around the temple, some of the surrounding wheat fields and staring down at the traffic as it sped deep into the mountain below where I was sitting. After a cheerful good bye to the Monk and two children who seemed to have appeared from no where I slowly made my way back down the mountain and way across to the river that runs along the bottom of the mountains that separated me from my city. When I finally made it back I dropped into the Muslim Eatery for a wonderful 'cold noodles, beef and veg' dish before heading across to China Mobile where I was going to put money on both my phone and Luo Wei's. As I am always careful what I do with my bike and where I put it I carried it up the set of stairs and put it right at the sliding doors. In fact the front wheel was inside the store and right next to my wheel was the information desk that had a rather cute China Mobile girl sitting behind it. Just a pane of glass between her and my bike. I had only taken about five steps and looked around to check my bike and surprise to me, it was gone but as I had only taken a few steps in a few seconds it didn't click straight away. The girl looked at my face and she then looked at where my bike was (about thirty centimeters from her side) and she then looked back at me and we both ran out of the store to stop and watch as my bike sped off up the road. Normally I would have raced up the road and probably would have caught him. But sadly I had been riding for about six hours and my legs wouldn't have taken me half the distance. We both just stood there as he disappeared into the crowds on Market Street that would have then taken him right down to my school. The son of a bitch probably rode right past it waving and the gate guard being the jolly feller that he is, would have smiled and given a big cheerful wave right back at him without any idea that it was my bike he was on. I spent the next few hours walking around the city in hope that the guy who stole it was just using it to get from point A to B like what happened in Guangxi. My bike disappeared and was soon found twenty minutes up the road at the supermarket. A few of us waited but no one ever came to claim it. So there you have it, my first stolen bike in China in just over four years. I've killed three, still have my dream bike at Guangxi Brads house and have now had one stolen. My chopsticks will fly in a flurry of furious frenzy if I find out who stole my bike. You can steal a mans iPod, his computer and even his girl (only because 'to be stolen' actually means she wants to go) but never, EVER steal a mans Beers N Noodles and defiantly not his damn bike, especially when he's just started riding again and the weather is perfect riding weather. But if you're hell bent on stealing his bike, don't steal it when he has a bloody four day weekend coming up. That makes it like one hundred times worse! Beers N Noodles toya.....shane _______________________________________ The soundtrack to this entry was by Eskimo Joe The album was 'A Song Is a City' _______________________________________

Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike

Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike


Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike

Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike


Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike

Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike


Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike

Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike


Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike

Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike


Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike

Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike


Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike

Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike


Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike

Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike


Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike

Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike


Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike

Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike


Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike

Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike


Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike

Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike


Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike

Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike


Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike

Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike


Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike

Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike


Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike

Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike


Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike

Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike


Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike

Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike


Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike

Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike


Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike

Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike


Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike

Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike


Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike

Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike


Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike

Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike


Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike

Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike


Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike

Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike


Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike

Freeway Temple Ride & Stolen Bike

Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)

Too Many Beers With Guangxi Brad & Englands MikeTV

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya, Catching up. Whilst we are on the subject of catching up. Last Thursday Guangxi Brad arrived in Xian and Friday evening we met at the hostel for a few cold Jim Beam and Colas. We then realised that we actually needed to swap to beer as only then could we say that it has been almost three years since we shared our last beer together over a Tianyang BBQ that consisted of all sorts of inners and outers. The last time we actually saw each other was when he dropped me off at the train station when I left my school in Tianyang and moved to my school in Gansu Province. Somewhere in between that I had an awesome time on my 2006 Summer Beers N Noodles Adventure. We have been planning to catch up over the past few years but being the Captain of the Baise Drug Squad poor Brad rarely has any time off. His squad covers much of the China/Vietnam border along with the south of Yunnan and the Yunnan/Laos border. Such a huge area for such a small squad but I'm sure they do the best they can. Finally this weekend busy Brad could put work aside and then too many beers before him. Some of it is a little hazy especially going to the street bbq at around four or five on Saturday morning. We had an absolute ripper of a time and I can even remember most of it. Both Friday and Saturday nights were spent at what has become my local which is the Xiang Zi Men YHA but Saturday night was an absolute pearler. We spent it with the guys from the English band Mike TV who are in China doing a whirlwind tour of many of the main cities all over the mainland. If you like Weezer and Green Day you are sure to like Mike TV and I've added a few links below for those who are interested. The entire night through until five in the morning was a shambles of people coming and going along with the hostel bar staff saying they were closing and then reopening for another hour to then say they were going to close again. We all knew it was a good way for them to make money from us as we'd all race to the bar to purchase a handful of 'last drinks'. In the end though they made the strangest decision. Instead of telling us to call it a night and go to our rooms they decided that it would be fine for us to go to someone's room to continue our shenanigans. Anyhow, no details needed as it was just your normal hostel party of mixed accents, a huge amount of travel stories, red wine spilt here and there and bottles being dropped all over the shop. I found quite amazing at how many countries we could squeeze into the one bed at one time. I spent most of my time chatting with a blonde guy from Sweden who was very much into the 1980's Heavy Metal scene. We had a blast talking about Venom, Destruction, Kreator etc and I was so over the top happy that some one over fifteen years younger than me is still rocking out to an almost identical band list that I grew up with. The difference is he has actually seen quite a few of them when they have put on re-union gigs. Surely that can't be fair, not fair at all for me! The afternoons were spent half in recovery mode whilst the other half of ourselves enjoyed many hours walking around both the Little and Big Wild Goose Pagodas. I haven't visited them since I was here with Aussie Judy sometime around mid 2006 and it was cool play the Tour Guide for another friend who has come to visit me this month. It was extremely nice to get away from the overbearing traffic sounds that seemed to boom and crash through my head like a Venom and Kreator re-union gig would. Those of course would be more than welcome. Late Sunday afternoon found Brad and I saying our sad good byes near the Arts District as he was off to Hua Shan early Monday morning and I of course would be acting like a Chicken or a Duck in the classroom at around the same time he would be taking his first steps in his eight hour climb to the top of the west peak. Upon arrival I'm sure he would then slump into a hostel bunk for the night to awaken to watch the sunrise early the Tuesday morning. Oh yeah, for Aussie Judy and Kylie, Brad and his wife are officially known as Mr & Mrs Smith in Guangxi! I always knew his wife was also in the Police force but I never actually knew what her job was until Brad mentioned they were now known as Mr & Mrs Smith. So, Mr Smith (being Brad) is a very well known Drug Squad Policeman and Mrs Smith (being Brad's wife) is actually a kung fu expert along with being what is the equivalent of an American SWAT Team member. That my friends is a very lethal marriage! Believe me, I will offer to do both the washing up and take the dust bins out in the near future when hopefully Luo Wei and I head down south to visit friends in Yangshuo, Nanning, Tianyang and Baise! Beers N Noodles toya.....shane PS: photos can be found beneath the info on both Pagodas and Mike TV. ___________________________________________ The soundtrack to this entry was by the Meat Puppets The album was 'to High To Die' ___________________________________________ <u>Who The Bloody Hell Are 'Mike TV'</u></b> The band (Mike TV used to be called Pickled Dick) have previously recorded fourteen track debut album 'Panda-moanium' (2005) and a follow-up six track E.P. 'Exercise Your Demons' (2006). Both discs were independently released under the name Pickled Dick, through their own label Don't Rush Me Records. They played over 600 shows in the UK and mainland Europe since their formation in 2000, without the help of any major or independent record label. They performed at Guilfest and 'Wasted/Rebellion' Festivals held in Blackpool Winter Gardens and Amsterdam's prestigious Melkweg venue. They also toured with Sonic Boom Six, Howards Alias, Jesse James, Adequate Seven, The Fight and supported Me First and the Gimme Gimmes on their UK tour in mid 2007, playing such venues as London's Kentish Town Forum and Carling Academy's in Birmingham and Newcastle. The band then followed all that up with a headline UK tour in late 2007, including topping the bill at Camden Underworld. They played with everyone from Gallows to Elliot Minor. They also won the Jagermeister 'National songwriting competition' in 2007. Their track is used to promote the Jagermeister advertising campaign. "Many of their songs are very intricate and longish, to the point where I described them as "bloody rock operas", but with their three-part harmonies and stop-on-a-dime changes, they're also incredibly catchy. Pickled Dick get my vote as one of England's better pop-punk bands today." - Larry Livermore, founder of Lookout Records (Green Day). The Official Mike TV website Mike TV's My Space <u>Small Wild Goose Pagoda</u> </b> The Small Wild Goose Pagoda, sometimes Little Wild Goose Pagoda, is one of two significant pagodas in the city of Xi'an, China, the site of the old Han and Tang capital Chang'an. The other notable pagoda is the Giant Wild Goose Pagoda, originally built in 652 and restored in 704. The Small Wild Goose Pagoda was built between 707-709, during the Tang Dynasty under Emperor Zhongzong of Tang (r 705-710). The pagoda stood 45 m (147 ft) until the 1556 Shaanxi earthquake. The earthquake shook the pagoda and damaged it so that it now stands at a height of 43 m (141 ft) with fifteen levels of tiers. The pagoda has a brick frame built around a hollow interior, and its square base and shape reflect the building style of other pagodas from the era. During the Tang Dynasty, the Small Wild Goose Pagoda stood across a street from its mother temple, the Dajianfu Temple. Indian pilgrims brought sacred Buddhist writings to the temple and pagoda from India, as the temple was one of the main centers in Chang'an for translating Buddhist texts. The temple was older than the pagoda, since it was founded in 684, exactly 100 days after the death of Emperor Gaozong of Tang (r. 649-683). Emperor Zhongzong had donated his residence to the building of a new temple here, maintaining the temple for 200 monks in honor of his deceased father Gaozong. The temple was originally called the Daxianfusi or Great Monastery of Offered Blessings by Zhongzong, until it was renamed Dajianfusi by Empress Wu Zetian in 690.

<u>Big Wild Goose Pagoda</u></b>

Giant Wild Goose Pagoda or Big Wild Goose Pagoda, is a Buddhist pagoda located in southern Xi'an, Shaanxi province, China. It was built in 652 during the Tang Dynasty and originally had five stories, although the structure was rebuilt in 704 during the reign of Empress Wu Zetian and its exterior brick facade renovated during the Ming Dynasty. One of the pagoda's many functions was to hold sutras and figurines of the Buddha that were brought to China from India by the Buddhist translator and traveller Xuanzang. The original pagoda was built during the reign of Emperor Gaozong of Tang (r. 649-683), then standing at a height of 54 m (177 ft). However, this construction of rammed earth with a stone exterior facade eventually collapsed five decades later. The ruling Empress Wu Zetian had the pagoda rebuilt and added five new stories by the year 704 AD. However, a massive earthquake in 1556 heavily damaged the pagoda and reduced it by three stories, to its current height of seven stories. The entire structure leans very perceptibly (several degrees) to the west. Its related structure, the 8th century Small Wild Goose Pagoda in Xi'an, only suffered minor damage in the 1556 earthquake (still unrepaired to this day). The Giant Wild Goose Pagoda was extensively repaired during the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) and renovated again in 1964. The pagoda currently stands at a height of 64 m (210 ft) tall. From the top it offers views over the current city of Xi'an. During the Tang Dynasty the pagoda was located within the grounds of a monastery, within a walled ward of the larger southeastern sector of the city, then known as Chang'an. The monastic grounds around the pagoda during the Tang Dynasty had ten courtyards and a total of 1,897 bays. Close by the pagoda is the Temple of Great Maternal Grace; Da Ci'en. This temple was originally built in AD 589 and then rebuilt AD 647 in memory of his mother Empress Wende by Li Zhi who later became the Tang Emperor Gaozong. The monk Xuanzang's statue stands in front of the temple area.

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad


Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Beers N Noodles With Guangxi Brad

Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)

A Most Awesome Weekend With The Gadget Family

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya, Catching up hey. Isn't it cool to catch up with people. I have just spent the weekend with my buddy Andrew who was actually my dentist from my very early twenties until not long before I headed overseas nine years ago. We have kept in touch all this time but have never quite been in the same part of the country or world at the same time to share a beer. For those who haven't read the blog I wrote not long ago, Andrews's daughters have been learning Mandarin for many years and some years they come across to Beijing city to spend some time in a 'real' Chinese classroom and to catch up with some of their old tutors and friends. Each past year though we have never been in the same part of China nor have I been on holidays at the time to allow me an adventure to where ever it is they are travelling. This year they chose Xian city for their 'extra city adventure'. How excited were we when we figured out that their choice was actually only two hours from where I live. So Friday night we finally clinked our first beers (small Chinese glasses though...bugger!) in nine years and I got to meet the rest of his family and the friends that had come across with them for their 2009 China adventure. To meet the Fishers and the Fisher Family Friends click here and you will be taken to Amy's blog of the day they left Australia. We made plans to meet the following morning to spend the day at one of China's most famous mountains which has also been at the center of controversy for many years as to whether it really is one of if not the worlds most dangerous 'mountain hike' (not mountain climb). Luo Wei really wanted to meet my friends from Australia and sadly as she had to help a friend at her uni the night before, she had to rise early to make the two hour journey to Xian to meet them. By the time she arrived she was so tired after her long hours during the week. So after meeting everyone she headed back to the hotel and slept the day away. When we returned from out Hua Shan adventure Luo Wei met us and took us to a traditional Chinese Eatery that had an actual picture menu to choose from. Even after four years I love a good picture menu. When we got there there was a little argument over how much 'they' wanted us to spend and how much 'we' wanted to spend. Being foreigners we were expected to spend well over a thousand Yuan which we had no intention of doing so Luo Wei called her 'brother' Liu Liu (6,6) who called one of his friends and they both came and sorted the restaurant staff out for us. We even got a few extra dishes thrown in. Liu Liu is one of those guys who has a finger in as many pies as possible. He has given most things a try and by doing so has met all the 'right people' to know type thing. So that brings us up to today (Sunday). Luo Wei headed back to her uni to continue helping friends with 'shop' things and I met the Fisher Family at the cities south gate where (after being introduced to some of their gadgets yesterday) I expected them to pull iBikes or something out of their day packs. I was imagining me saying, Hey lets go hire bikes, you can get them on top of the wall. Then me saying, Um...what's that? Ha Ha Ha, it's an iBike silly. Oh, an iBike...ok! Happily for me there is no such thing as an iBike and after hiring many tandem and single seated bikes we spent the next several hours changing bikes and bike partners (wipe that smirk off your face Andrew!) and riding around the city walls which is something I actually haven't done before. I did spend three days last year walking one day around the inside, one day around the outside and finally one day walking around the top of the walls. Out of them all I think my favourite would be walking around the track that takes you around the outside of the walls as it takes you through all the different gardens that surround the city. Before you choose between that and riding around the top of the wall, the walls are over fourteen kilometers in total, so maybe riding the wall is a better choice. Maybe you can hire a bike somewhere and ride around the outside but I didn't see anyone on a bike when I was on my adventures at the bottom of the walls. Maybe you are not allowed to takes bikes into each section of the gardens. After riding around the top of the walls we all headed across to the Arts Precinct and then down to the Muslim Quarter (for information on the Muslim Quarter). Sadly due to time restrictions we had to skip the Ancient Mosque and we slowly made our way back to the subway beneath the Bell Tower where we said our sad goodbyes until 2011 when they will return for their next Chinese adventure. During which we will hopefully all head to the Xishuangbanna Region via the Maldives. Hahahahaha just joking! So besides having one of the greatest weekends I've had for a long time I actually learned a lot from the Fisher Family whom are know known as The Gadget Family. I was totally surprised at how well behaved and 'normal' all the kids were. Mostly all in their teens and even on a tiring and tight schedule they all seem to still get along with each other and remain easy to get along with. None seemed to be 'too cool for school' type thing, in fact the entire bunch (family and friends) were some of the most down to earth people I've met which made the time we spent together a very memorable time for me and I actually can't wait until we can catch up again. Before saying my usual Beers N Noodles toya, below is a small selection of why I should get out of my rice field more often, so read and enjoy a laugh at my expense. ########################################## Me: Something must be wrong with Amy's iPod. Me: Or maybe she's cleaning the screen. It's an iPod Touch Shane. Me: Oh, an iPod Touch...ok. For sometime now when I passed a couple backpacking who both had their iPods/MP3's out I always thought it was cute that they were taking the time to clean them together.....MP3's with touch screens, of course, why didn't I think of that. I thought I was cool using a touch screen at an ATM terminal and even cooler with my black and white iPod with a little whirly wheel thing that clicks when you turn it. Where are we on the wall Dad? How much further? Me: Here I have a map. Me: What's that little box thing? Me: A GPS? Oh of course, it's a GPS! Aren't GPS's those things that astronauts use in the space shuttle or that pilots use in planes to get you from point A to B. I also do know that you can have them in cars/4WD's and that somehow you can use GPS on your laptop if it has the 'whatever it is stuff' that is needed to run it. A little palm held GPS, of course, why didn't I think of that. Man I've always thought I was cool standing on a street corner trying to figure out which way is north with a confused look on my face with my Lonely Planet guide or city map full of little blue dots and arrows. After spending the weekend with the Fisher Family and Friends I honestly think that maybe I should get out of my rice field a little more often than I have in the past four years. All these new 'things' that I had kind of heard of but have never seen or used were all there before my confused self over the weekend. On the bus to Hua Shan (Hua Mountain) all laptops were open and each operator doing a different thing. Me: What are you doing? Fisher: I'm reading an iBook. Me: Oh an iBook....very quickly I close my day pack with my Penguin Classic in it. Me: What are you doing? Fisher: I'm doing my homework? Me: But we are travelling in a bus going to Hua Shan. Fisher: Yes we are. Me: So you are willingly doing your homework, in a bus on a computer without being asked to do so. (me) Fisher: Yes I am. Me: What are you doing? Fisher: I'm watching a movie on my MP5. Me: MP5? Fisher: Yes MP5. Me: Does it have touch screen? Fisher: Yes it does but sometimes you have to shake it like this to stop it from freezing. FINALLY!</b> Yes Finally I felt on familiar ground. Me: Yes Yes, I used to have to do that with my Walkman when the tape went all funny. (me) Fisher: Um, what's a Walkman and what's a tape? Me: Bugger! Enough of embarrassing my self, most of the above actually happened and the rest of it went through my mind as I was listening to one of the Fisher Family explaining to me what their gadget was. Putting aside all gadget jokes, they didn't really have them out that oftern, its just that when they did I only kind of knew what they were. Oh yeah, don't go expecting one of the Fisher Children to be the Master of Gadgets in the family. Everyone turn and bow to Puppa Gadget as he is the King of all Gadgets known to man, even the dentist drill!

I'm thinking that the next time I go in for a check up with him he'll smile and say, it's an iDrill Touch mate! I'll lay there thinking awesome mate, so I just touch this drill and my teeth will be fixed. As you can tell the world has moved on and I'm being quickly left behind. I'm beginning to feel like Austin Powers felt after he was defrosted but I'm getting kind of worried that maybe the next time I'm in line at an airport I may try to figure out what the little pump things are on my sneakers or even my shirt collar and get done for drugs when they/it explodes in my face. To be honest I find myself more facinated by what is happening around me over here. Whenever I see (which is not very often at all) a field with some sort of tractor in it (even if it looks one hundred years old) I find myself smiling at the fact that the world has finally moved on a little for someone who really needs it. Like all teenagers this year my nieces and nephews all got Wii's (or what ever they are) for Christmas. I, of course asked them how a W2 works and they of course laughed and asked me what a W2 was. I explained that they all got one for Christmas and I was told that no, they are not called a W2 but a Wii as in Wee, that everything was wireless and that you had games like boxing, tennis, aerobics, guitar etc. I thought I was cool actually going for a walk or a ride though rice fields. I also thought I was cool for still excitedly playing air guitar after a few beers. So after a most wonderful weekend and learning about all of these new gadgets I am left sitting here in total confusion as to why my nieces and nephews and other friends children still complain of being bored each time we speak or when they are on holidays. Maybe boredom is something that is simply part of being a teenager. Maybe it is also something that you can grow out of as all I have in life is an iPod 'clickety whirl', a camera, a travel computer, a bike and a backpack. And I honestly can't remember the last time I was bored. Beers N Noodles toya.....shane ______________________________________________________________________________ The soundtrack to this entry was by all Travelpod Readers whom I hope will all get together and help me thank the Fishers and Fisher Friends for one of the most wonderful weekends I've had. So let's all hold hands and instead of singing The Adams Family we can change it to.... Da Da Da Da - DA DA Da Da Da Da - DA DA Da Gadget Family! Thanks toyuz! Awesome! _______________________________________________________________________________

City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places

City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places


City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places

City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places


City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places

City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places


City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places

City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places


City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places

City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places


City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places

City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places


City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places

City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places


City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places

City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places


City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places

City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places


City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places

City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places


City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places

City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places


City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places

City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places


City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places

City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places


City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places

City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places


City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places

City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places


City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places

City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places


City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places

City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places


City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places

City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places


City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places

City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places


City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places

City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places


City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places

City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places


City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places

City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places


City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places

City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places


City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places

City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places


City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places

City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places


City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places

City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places


City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places

City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places


City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places

City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places


City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places

City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places


City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places

City Wall Ride &#38;amp; Market Places

Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)

Hua Shan...Is It Really The Most Dangerous Trail?

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya, After reading this blog and viewing the photos ask your self this; Would you be game/stupid enough to walk the plank? Over the past few years most of you along with your friends would have received an email with a PowerPoint display showing an insanely dangerous plank walk that has led to many 'walkers/hikers' deaths after making but a small mistake. Those pictures (above) are of the walking track to the majestic south peak at Mount Huashan which is located around four hours from where I live and where I spent yesterday with my buddy Andrew, his family and several of their friends who are all visiting from Australia for several weeks. Situated in Huayin City, 120 kilometers east from Xi'an City in Shaanxi Province is Mt. Huashan. It is one of the five sacred mountains in China. The other four mountains are Mt. Taishan in Shandong, Mt. Hengshan in Hunan, Mt. Hengshan in Shanxi, and Mt. Songshan in Henan. Formerly the five mountains were dotted with temples but today only a few remain. These days the majority of visitors to Huashan are Chinese youth on vacation. However the mountain routes are still trekked by devoted pilgrims and wandering monk's intent of visiting the sacred shrines. From a distance the five peaks seem to form the shape of a 'flower' (hua in Chinese). It is famous for its natural vistas of steep and narrow paths, precipitous crags, and a high mountain range. It is home to several influential Taoist temples where emperors of past dynasties made pilgrimages and came to prey and sacrifice to the God of Huashan, making Mt. Huashan the holy land of Taoism.

Lao Zi (Lao Tze), the founder and patriarch of Taoism, once lived and gave sermons here. The south peak of this mountain has been named one of, if not THE most dangerous Tourist Hiking Trail in the world. Logic tells you that there is a big difference between mountain climbing and mountain hiking. Mountain climbers have spent a lot of money and time being trained, they then gather experience, and also have all the necessary equipment to go where they choose to hang about for fun. Add to that they all know and choose to take risks they are taking. Mountain Hiking on the other hand is done by people such as you, your friends and even your grandparents (maybe if they were Chinese). The walking tracks and stairs are supposed to be well made, safe and have ropes or chains on either side of the trails. Mountain hiking is supposed to be a nice adventure for the afternoon or for a few days. It also is supposed to allow you to wear your comfortable shoes and normal every day clothes. When you talk to tourist agencies and most of all Chinese people, you are led to believe that a day at Hua Shan is just the above, a relaxing day spent mountain hiking and if you were to join one of their tour groups you would have no reason to doubt this as everyone around you will be dressed for such a day. No matter where you are in China the Chinese will be ready for and dressed for a normal day either at work or for a few hours playing in the park. I could write about my head shaking experiences when I've gone travelling, mountain hiking or whatever with some of my Chinese friends over the past four years but my friend Amy (one of the Fisher girls who I went to Hua Shan with) got it spot on when she wrote the following about her experience on the mountain (I added a few more words and sentences here and there). Set upon the spine of sections of the mountain the actual walking track along with the almost vertical stair cases (carved into the stone) is little over a meter wide. That believe it or not is for people going both up the mountain and down the mountain. On either side of this small track in most places is a sheer drop of somewhere between one to two thousand meters. It just drops straight down and the only thing that stops you falling is a little chain. It is honestly the most terrifying thing that I have done (Amy). It is super, super steep and around forty five to ninety degrees in some places. It is also very hard work especially because there were so many people and we had to walk so slowly. It is safe to say that it would not be allowed in Australia or most western countries. During the walk, we saw four types of craziness; 1: The mothers who carried their babies. 2: The ladies wearing skirts, stockings and high heels. 3: The men in full lounge suits, complete with jacket, tie and patent leather shoes and 4: The penultimate of insaneness were the men building a hotel on the peak who were carrying things such as sixty kilo bags of cement, cement blocks and other unthinkable objects either on their backs or on either end of the famous Asian bamboo pole, this went far beyond my comprehension! (Click here to read Amays day on Hua Shan) Now back to me; Having travelled China for so long and climbed many of the famous mountains, much of the above I was familiar with but what I wasn't familiar with nor was I ready for was the actual mountain itself along with the fact that the walking track was so narrow and how dangerous it was or could be in some places. The climb was difficult but made more so by the fact that you had so many other people around you and the fact that in so many places you had nearing forty five or ninety degree drops didn't make you feel any better. This made it much more difficult mentally. All in all though it really isn't as bad as it all sounds or looks in the photos. I think the real dangers you face climbing this mountain are the crowds of people and the weather. Get caught near the edge of a thousand foot drop and a huge gust of wind comes from out of nowhere, well you pretty much have your own stupidity to blame because you shouldn't have gone over the chain. It is there for a reason. If you walk with caution, don't mess around and take care of yourself and those around you there is no reason for this mountain to be a danger to you or anyone you are with.. But if you play the idiot, rush past other people, become impatient then it becomes just like any road you drive on and someone other than yourself may pay for your impatience with their life. Remember that no one has to do the plank walk, there are other ways to go and for those who do actually want to do the plank walk then they must also understand that Hua Shan had a face lift in 2005 and the plank walk now comes complete with a harness and extra chains to support your weight. To me though, I think harness or no harness I'm much happier and feel more than safe walking on a solid walkway that has a chain to hold onto. Some of the stairs are steep but they also have a chain fence to hold onto. Remember the pictures at the top of the page were taken prior to the 2005 facelift. From what I can gather it still looks the same but with a harness rail and a few more chains. There is now also a super fast cable car that takes you to the top of the north peak and in my views the actual cable car ride is probably the scariest part of the entire adventure. Man that thing zooms up and down the mountain so fast and at such a steep angle. I'm kind of one of those people who has a fear of things like cable cars and carnival rides. When I look at them, to me they are in places and doing things they just shouldn't be doing and it doesn't help that I have no freaking idea how they do the things they are doing either. What would be my advice if someone were to tell me they were heading to Hua Shan? To make it easy, when you are there simply look around you and you will see kids as young as five along with grandparents doing the same walk you are doing. Being Chinese they will obviously be walking around without a hint of fear in their eyes while you will spend more time than is needed worrying about falling off the side of the mountain. I'm unsure how you would fall off the side of the mountain unless you were actually being a total idiot but yes, I spent much more time than was needed looking into the abyss and wondering how to make sure I didn't end up there. For those who have never been to 'real' China before they have a much different view on what fear really is. They are raised with holes in their roads, trenches everywhere, open sewers, man holes with no lids, up to four on a small motor scooter, crossing a more than busy road without ever having been taught to look both ways etc. They just cross and believe that anyone behind them will go around them. Fear I guess is something that is also a cultural thing. Much of what is allowed here in China is not actually 'allowed' so to speak. It is just part of daily life here and always has been. We use the term 'allowed or legal' because we have put an end to it in our own society due to our own fears, judgments and changing societies. Growing up I never had a fear of cables until compensation hit Australian shores in the eighties and now of course everyone has a huge fear of laying a cable of any sort in the wrong place in fear of some idiot tripping over it. I also never used to have a fear of calling a beautiful girl 'beautiful' but things have gotten so bad back home that most people don't seem to know when you can do such a thing anymore and now choose not to just incase she is in search of a quick buck. I grew up being taught to test any water prior to diving in but now it seems even adults need to be parented by the government as to where they can dive into a river (of course without testing it first mainly because they are too stupid to). Then we have children's play grounds and public parks, I still can not believe that a man who was drunk and decided to hang by his knees and fell actually won a compensation claim because there was no rubber matting beneath the monkey bars. I never had a fear of red lights or hook turns until a huge impatient Albanian guy began franticly beeping me from behind. Thankfully I chose not to give in to his impatience because a second later a car sped past me. The Albanian guy didn't seem fazed that I and my girlfriend of the time would have been either killed or very badly hurt because he continued his beeping. When I chose to go (when it was legal AND SAFE to do so by the lights) he cut my car off and spent the next ten minutes beating my window and circling my car trying to get to me to hurt me probably just as much as the other car would have. Thankfully his friends who were just as huge as he was seemed to figure out what probably would have happened if I did go due to his impatience and dragged him away from my car. So I am kind of thinking that road rage, red lights, hook turns and calling a beautiful girl beautiful in big cities are probably far more dangerous and fearful than climbing Hua Shan. For those of you who are continuing to shake their heads after viewing the photos at the bottom of the page of where we climbed now add this to your 'are you stupid' thoughts.....ready.....my girl friend Luo Wei began climbing this mountain at ten in the evening with some friends and arrived at the western peak at three in the morning so they could watch the sunrise. They had only several torches between their entire group but from what I can gather some of the trails do have lighting at night time, but I doubt that they did prior to 2005. In my photos below, the western peak is the photo that has half a pine tree to the left side of the photo. To the right of this pine tree there is a huge rock cliff face and a narrow track leading up to a temple that has a tree covered sloping edge to the right of it. Also check out the group of people who have stepped over the chain and are trying to get a better view of where they will fall if they were to take but a single step more!

Ok I' add the photo here but I have to add it three times or the rest of the page will be out of wack. Sit and stare at the guy right at the edge for awhile.

It makes my stomach lurch just looking at him more so because it is human nature to fight and struggle to survive and if he was to trip or be pushed the first thing he would do would be to grab hold of the person next to him and they would do the same and so on and so on. I would say that nearly that entire group would be gone within seconds. Both sides will take you to complete nothingness until you hit the ground below. For those of you who like meters it is exactly 2087 meters below Or for those who like feet, you will fall 6846 feet, then splat. Now sit back and choose which side you'd prefer. Luo Wei had never been to Hua Shan and I guess if you climbed it at night you would honestly have no idea at all the situation you were in as you would only see a few feet to either side of you. Would I climb it at night? I don't think I would but maybe I would have before seeing it during the day light hours. At night I guess you would think you were climbing an actual 'normal mountain' and not along what has been termed 'the spine of god'. I could only imagine how I'd would feel after sunrise as it would be only then that I would realise the reality of what I had completed several hours prior. Ok, enough of my stupidity, we must end the blog with a laugh. </b> Whilst talking to Canadian Rob last night I was explaining Hua Shan to him and his very direct answer to ever climbing the mountain was 'I'd rather have my teeth pulled'. This almost made me fall off my chair in hysterics. He didn't see the funny side until I explained to him that Andrew is a dentist. Could you imagine if he was with us. We finish the cable car ride to the north peak, exit the cable car terminal and after looking up one of us would say, 'Ok then, lets begin shall we'. Canadian Robs jaw would drop and he'd say, 'What! Are we climbing way up there on that bloody tiny track along the spine of the mountain.....I'd rather have my bloomin teeth pulled! I'm sure if it was a movie, right about here is when every living thing would go silent and only the breeze would be heard. Andrew would then enter the scene in white coat with dentist drill in one hand and dentist needle in the other and say...Ok then, let's begin shall we! Beers N Noodles toya.....shane ___________________________________________ The soundtrack to this entry was by Blue Oyster Cult Don't fear the reaper even on Hua Shan! The album was 'Agents of Fortune' ___________________________________________ The text below my photos (below) was taken from the site that made the South Peak climb at Hua Shan famous world wide. If I was you after viewing my photos I'd move on to this site and read it as it is supposed to be read, with photos, comments, arrows etc. I only added it to the end of my blog so I'd have the information if I needed it. If you don't have much time YOU MUST read the story called A FOOLISH JOURNEY. Its about half way down the page and is about a man and his girlfriend who were stupid enough to make the journey to the south peak in mid winter along the ice covered planks and chains. There are questions as to how 'real' it is but I'd say most of it would have more than enough truth to it http://www.ssqq.com/ARCHIVE/vinlin27d.htm

<u>You Begin at Yuquan Yuan (Jade Spring Temple)</u></b> Usually tourists climb up the mountain assisted by the iron chains along the way and start their tour from Yuquan Yuan (Jade Spring Temple), one of the main Taoist temples in China located at the foot of Mt. Huashan. It has the architectural style of the classical gardens in south China. There is a pond in the center and several pavilions around it. Walking through the Wuyou Pavilion, the Long Corridor of Seventy-two Windows comes into view, and afterwards Qingke Ping where a big rock called 'Huixin Rock' can be seen. It is said that 'Huixin Rock' is a reminder for those who wish to stop their tour at this point. Beside the rock are the precipitous 370 rock steps called 'Qianchi Zhuang' considered to be the primary breath-taking path of Mt. Huashan. When climbing, only a gleam of sky above can be seen, making climbers feel as if they were at the bottom of a well. <u>The East Peak (Facing Peak)</u></b> The East Peak is 2,090 meters (about 6,857 ft) high above sea level. It is also called Facing Sun Peak because the top of the peak is the best place to watch the sunrise. Tour guides may promote climbing the mountain at night to see the sunrise. Climbing to the top of East Peak requires 4 to 6 hours. East Peak has an altitude of 2,090 meters (about 6,857 feet) forming a platform for visitors to view the sunrise. An astronomical telescope is provided here. The reference time for sunrise and sunset is 5:00a.m.-6:00a.m. in spring, 4:30a.m.-5:20a.m. in summer, 5:00a.m.-5:20a.m. in autumn, 5:30a.m.-6:00a.m. in winter. One well-known scenic spot called the 'Immortal's Palm Peak of Mt. Huashan' which is ranked as one of the 'Eight Scenic Wonders of the Guanzhong Area (the plain area in the middle of Shaanxi Province)' is located on East Peak. It refers to the natural rock veins of the cliff which look like a giant palm-print. Legend has it that on March 3rd of the Lunar Calendar a torrential flood erupted, destroying the villages within the Mt. Huashan area. This disaster was caused by the Queen Mother of the West, who held her 'Flat Peach Carnival' celebration that year. She carelessly spilled a little jade wine down from paradise, causing a serious flood below. This news was quickly reported by Deity Shaohao to the Jade Emperor in Celestial Paradise. He gave a prompt order to Deity Juling to go down to tame the flood. When Deity Juling, full of vigor and vitality, descended from the clouds, he arrived at the precipitous cliff of East Peak. At the moment that he laid his left hand on one side and his right leg on the other, he ripped the mountain into two halves and immediately a flood rushed out. This tale adds luster to East Peak. <u>The Middle Peak is also called Jade Maiden Peak. </u></b> Story goes that Nongyu, the daughter of King Mugong (659B.C.-621B.C.) of the Qin Kingdom (770B.C.-476B.C.), was tired of the life in the court. So she and her husband moved to Huashan and lived alone at Middle Peak. Middle Peak clings to East peak and is in the center of East, South and West Peaks. There is a Taoist temple in the peak named 'Jade Maiden Temple'. Legend has it that the daughter of Qin Mugong (569 B.C.-621 B.C.) loved a man who was good at playing Chinese tung-hsiao (vertical flute) and she gave up the royal life to become a hermit who cultivated her spirituality here, hence the name Jade Maiden Peak. Today Jade Maiden Temple and Jade Maiden Basin for Shampooing can be found on the peak. Other scenic spots in Middle Peak include Rootless Tree and Sacrificing Tree which have beautiful stories and add to the supernatural atmosphere of Middle Peak. <u>The West Peak is 2,087 meters (about 6,846 ft) high. </u></b> It is always called Lotus Peak because of its unique shape. This peak is formed by a huge rock. Hence it's very steep. As stated earlier, Mt. Huashan has 5 peaks. The West Peak seen in the pictures above is said to be the most graceful peak. I think "Graceful Peak" is Chinese-speak for 'you don't have to risk your life to visit the temple.' On the other hand, even the West Peak Temple is hard to reach. That said, the view atop the West Peak Summit is breathtaking! Now you see why people make the climb. <u>The North Peak was called Clouds Stand by ancient people. </u></b> Today it is called the Cloud Terrace Peak as it looks like a flat terrace in the clouds. The peak is 1,614 meters (about 5,295 ft) above sea level. An important site on the North Peak is Zhenwu Hall (God of North). Three sides are cliffs that are nearly impossible to climb and the fourth side is the 'ear rubbing cliff'. This route gets its name because there are places on this precipitous path where tourists can climb up only by pressing an ear close to the cliff. Across the 'Qianchi Zhuang' are two similar precipitous paths-respectively called 'Baichi Xia' and 'Laojun Li' above which climbers reach Mt. Huashan's North Peak. There are precipitous cliffs on all sides of North Peak, making it look like a flat terrace in the clouds, hence the name Cloud Terrace Peak. It is 1,614 meters (about 5,295 feet) high. Three sides are cliffs and one side is to the 'Ca'er (the ear rubbing the cliff) Cliff' which is the fourth precipitous path where tourists can climb up only by pressing an ear close to the cliff. In the waist of North Peak trees are luxuriantly green, creating a good rest spot. <u>The majestic South Peak is.....the...... </u></b> With an altitude of 2,160 meters (about 7,087 feet), ancient people called this the 'Monarch of Mt. Huashan' because it is the highest peak of Mt. Huashan. It is also the highest peak among the Five Sacred Mountains of China. The temple for the God of Mt. Huashan is situated on the South Peak. Tourists who summit South Peak are rewarded with panoramic views of the surrounding mountains. The famous Yellow River wanders far below and everything seems small. Legend has it that the wild geese returning from the south often landed at South Peak, giving the area the name 'Landing Wild Geese Peak' The South Peak is the dangerous peak at the center of our story. The South Peak is very popular for climbing despite its peril. In the middle of South Peak trees are luxuriantly green, creating a good rest spot. At the top of South Peak, the 'Black Dragon Pool' at the summit and the 'Greeting Pines' on the southwestern cliff are two attractive resorts. Mt. Huashan is famous for its egregious cliffs. Nowhere are the cliffs more difficult to climb than the South Peak. There are rugged cliffs on all four sides of South Peak. A tortuous 15 kilometer stepped path leads to the Black Dragon Ridge (Bilong ji) where other trails lead to the major peaks. In order to reach certain temples and the caves of the sages great courage is needed. The climbers must scale steep cliffs with only a linked chain for support. The most dangerous place is called 'Changkong Zhandao' (a plank path built along the surface of a vertical cliff) which is about 4 meters (about 13 feet) long and about 0.33 meters (about 1.1 feet) wide. Below is the bottomless gulf which makes tourists shake with fear. To fall is certain death. To say the South Peak climb is 'formidable' would be an understatement. Along the cliff of South Peak is a planked path equipped with iron chains. These devices help, of course, but there are few safety features. One mistake and the climber meets eternity. Further up it gets even more difficult. Here there are chains and rock footholds which allow the adventurers to continue on the frightful path past precipitous rock faces and yawning chasms. Always far below, the valley beckons. Only the foolish dare to look down. Furthermore, no one dares to think of the trip back. In some ways, that's even tougher because you are so tired. And don't forget the people coming down have to get around the people coming up. Please keep in mind these climbers are not professionals! Most of them are Chinese college kids here on vacation. They are not equipped with any sort of modern climbing equipment or even the proper shoes. Nor do they have climbing experience. All they have going for them are their hands, their feet, and their courage. Plus they are trapped, once they discover the sheer precipices and overhanging rocks, at this point it is very difficult to go back. If it rains, they are in trouble. If the wind picks up, they are in trouble. If the wood has a slippery spot or a chain comes loose. But always there is the temptation of the magnificent beauty as the scenery changes at every step along this path. The Beauty of the Mountain seems to cast a magic spell over all who pass. http://www.ssqq.com/ARCHIVE/vinlin27d.htm

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family


Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Hua Shan With The Fisher Family

Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)