A Travellerspoint blog

March 2010

There is No Mosque Crescent Moon..April Fools!

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya,

Your shoe lace is undone….April Fool! Made you look! Made you look! Dirty chook hanging from a butchers hook!

Today at the beginning of class my Grade 6 students all stood and wished me a Happy April Fool’s Day which was both rather strange and amusing. The fact that they had actually heard of it was stranger still and yet it became more amusing as the class progress as they kept telling me that my pen was on the floor or that lights were off yet they were obviously on.

During class they tried so hard to April Fool me that in the end I fell for the fact that the lights were off (when they were actually on) and when I went over to turn them back on the class yelled that I was an April Fool and then happily raced down the stairs to tell their friends and I guess we all lived happily ever after!

On Thursday’s both Brad and I finish at three in the afternoon (pity it wasn’t Fridays!) so today as it was a warm and sunny day we grabbed Ying and Yang our twin Chinese Plodalong Bikes with baskets and scampered in a northern direction towards a temple I found on my ride with Sarah last weekend which was sadly closed at the time. Today upon arrival we found the small steel door closed once again so I decided to knock and rattle it with my front wheel and hope for the best.

Several seconds later we heard footsteps followed by the jingle of a lock. A young guy then popped his head through the door and invited us in.

We found that the temple was actually a mosque and I was once again facing the same question that I have asked myself on several occasions during past travels when I have come across a mosque that has no crescent moon symbol. It is kind of like finding a church that has no cross above its front door and better yet, it is also like coming across a Mc Donald’s that doesn’t have the huge golden arches looming somewhere above.

For those who have been left wondering the same question about the crescent moon continue reading as I have added one possible answer below and further down I have also added the history of April Fool’s Day.

The mosque can be found to the north and on the outskirts of town along Tianhan Road and even though it is very small it is in fact very picturesque and quiet. We spent the next half an hour walking around taking photos and after thanking the guy for allowing us such a wonderful opportunity we headed for a ride out in the fields and through several small villages before heading back onto the city to a one of our favourite eateries which can be found in what was once the lobby of a large hotel at the beginning of what is known as 'Food Street’. Food street can be found behind KFC and is a small back street that is teaming with food and people throughout the day yet strangely closes down before dark with only a few doors left opened for those with a late night hunger.

After paying our usual nearing four Aussie Dollars the next five minutes found small bowl after small bowl being placed before us to devour with delight. They contain everything from different types of porridges to several types of dumplings, noodles and meats depending on the night. There has only been two occasions we have been let down and both nights were when we arrived too late for the 10, 15 or 20 Yuan Bowlathon!

<u>Allah was originally the Moon God?</u>

Archaeologists have uncovered temples to the Moon-god throughout the Middle East.

From the mountains of Turkey to the banks of the Nile, the most wide-spread religion of the ancient world was the worship of the Moon-god. History reveals that the temple of the Moon-god was active even in the Christian era. Artifacts gathered from both North and South Arabia demonstrates that Moon-god worship was clearly active even in Muhammad's day and was still the dominant cult.

According to numerous inscriptions, while the name of the Moon-god was Sin, his title was al- ilah, i.e. "the deity," meaning that he was the chief or high god among the gods. "The god Il or Ilah was originally a phase of the Moon God." The Moon-god was called al- ilah, i.e. the god, which was shortened to Allah in pre-Islamic times.

Not all mosques’ have the crescent moon symbol. There is no basis in sharee’ah for taking the crescent or star as a symbol of the Muslims.

This was not known at the time of the Prophet or at the time of the Khulafa’ al-Raashidoon (the first four leaders of Islam after the death of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him), or during the time of the Umawis (Umayyad dynasty). It emerged some time after that, and historians differ as to when this symbol was first adopted and who was the first to adopt it.

Some say it was the Persians, others say it was the Greeks and that this symbol was somehow passed to the Muslims.

It was said that the reason why the Muslims adopted the crescent was that when they conquered some western countries, the churches there had crosses on top of them, the Muslims replaced the crosses with these crescents, and the practice spread in this way. Whatever the case, symbols and banners must be in accordance with the teachings of Islam, and as there is no evidence that this symbol is prescribed by Islam, it is better not to use it.

Neither the crescent nor the star are actual symbols of the Muslims.

<u>THE HISTORY OF APRIL FOOLS DAY</u>

Unlike most of the other non-foolish holidays, the history of April Fool's Day (sometimes called All Fool's Day) is not totally clear. There really wasn't a "first April Fool's Day" that can be pinpointed on the calendar. Some believe it sort of evolved simultaneously in several cultures at the same time, from celebrations involving the first day of spring. The closest point in time that can be identified as the beginning of this tradition was in 1582, in France. Prior to that year, the New Year was celebrated for eight days, beginning on March 25. The celebration culminated on April 1.

With the reform of the calendar under Charles IX, the Gregorian calendar was introduced and New Year's Day was moved to January 1.

However, communication being what it was in the days when news traveled by foot, many people did not receive the news for several years. Others, the more obstinate crowd, refused to accept the new calendar and continued to celebrate the New Year on April 1. These backward folk were labeled as "fools" by the general populace. They were subject to some ridicule, were often sent on "fool’s errands" or were made the butt of other practical jokes.

This harassment evolved over time into a tradition of prank-playing. The tradition eventually spread to England and Scotland in the eighteenth century.

It was later introduced to the American colonies of both the English and French. April Fool's Day thus developed into an international fun fest, so to speak, with different nationalities specializing in their own brand of humor at the expense of their friends and families. In Scotland, for example, April Fool's Day is actually celebrated for two days. The second day is devoted to pranks involving the posterior region of the body. It is called Taily Day. The origin of the "kick me" sign can be traced to this observance. Mexico's counterpart of April Fool's Day is actually observed on December 28. Originally, the day was a sad remembrance of the slaughter of the innocent children by King Herod.

It eventually evolved into a lighter commemoration involving pranks and trickery.

Pranks performed on April Fool's Day range from the simple, (such as saying, "Your shoe's untied!), to the elaborate. Setting a roommate's alarm clock back an hour is a common gag. Whatever the prank, the trickster usually ends it by yelling to his victim, "April Fool!" Practical jokes are a common practice on April Fool's Day. Sometimes, elaborate practical jokes are played on friends or relatives that last the entire day. The news media even gets involved. For instance, a British short film once shown on April Fool's Day was a fairly detailed documentary about "spaghetti farmers" and how they harvest their crop from the spaghetti trees.

Nobody is expected to buy gifts or to take their "significant other" out to eat in a fancy restaurant. Nobody gets off work or school. It's simply a fun little holiday, but a holiday on which one must remain forever vigilant, for he may be the next April Fool!

Beers N Noodles toya…..shane ___________________________________________________________

The soundtrack to this entry was by The Pixies The album was a random play of &#8216;Bossanova, Doolittle & Surfer Rosa’ ____________________________________________________________

April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure

April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure


April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure

April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure


April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure

April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure


April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure

April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure


April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure

April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure


April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure

April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure


April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure

April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure


April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure

April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure


April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure

April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure


April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure

April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure


April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure

April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure


April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure

April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure


April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure

April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure


April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure

April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure


April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure

April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure


April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure

April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure


April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure

April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure


April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure

April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure


April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure

April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure


April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure

April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure


April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure

April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure


April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure

April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure


April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure

April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure


April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure

April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure


April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure

April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure


April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure

April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure


April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure

April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure


April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure

April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure


April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure

April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure


April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure

April Fools Day Ancient Mosque Adventure

Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)

Walking The Ancient Baoxie/Shimen Plank Road

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya,

Poor gives way to Wealth, Junior to Senior, Light to Heavy and Leaving to Arriving.

In the development of human civilisation later generations sometimes cannot but admire the outstanding intelligence and wisdom of their ancestors. Although their technologically was primitive their feats continue to amaze experts and later generations often find it hard to fully appreciate the significance of their historical message.

Mid morning yesterday found me somehow lifting my head off the pillow to begin the day after a huge X-Files night. I’ve had to keep the DVD’s on the back shelf for a few months as once I begin I can’t seem to stop watching and week nights find me glued to the screen until all hours promising myself 'just one more episode and then I’ll go to bed’. It never seems to work and one more episode turns into two, then three and then four more.

Before I know it I’m almost sharing my poached eggs and vegemite breakfast sandwich with Molder and Scully prior to dashing off to class.

After brunch and a second wake up coffee at KFC with Sarah we headed across to East Street to do our best to find Bus No: 21. I found the bus number on the internet and several of the teachers told me that it was the correct bus to catch, strangely though all of the bus stops had only Bus No’s 102 and 6 posted. On the bus to and from I did notice Bus No: 21 whizzing by quite frequently so I am sure that if anyone reading this intends on visiting the Plank Road that you’ll get there by catching either 102 or 21.

Thankfully we were amongst a small handful of young locals and after showing several of them where we wanted to go a university student came to our aid and told us that he also was heading to the Plank Road for the day. Together we boarded Bus No: 102 (across from the Tainhan Square on East Street) and for the next twenty minutes we chatted our way north west to a small dusty river side town (maybe called Shimen) and after crossing a bridge across the River Baohe we were told that this was our stop.

Soon after we were forking out the 50 Yuan entrance fee into Shimen Park.

As you would expect, the riverside park is full of the plank roads history and besides the tacky fake trees it is actually a beautiful place to spend the afternoon. There are small sections of the original plank road to visit, most of which now lay beneath the dam waters. We made our way to the top of the dam wall and spent the next few hours walking along the newer version of the plank road to where it ends at a small picturesque pagoda. We decided to continue along the walking track that led us to the small mountain side home of a local goat herder where we spent a happy fifteen minutes trying to play with some baby goats before making our way slowly back to the dam wall where Sarah and I parted ways.

She took the flying fox across the river (25 Yuan one way or 30 Yuan return) and as it had several hundred feet between the &#8216;flying foxer’ and the small amount of water below I decided to walk across the wall and meet her on the other side.

I’m more than happy to climb mountains, sometimes on crazily dangerous pathways that many others turn away from or take a bus ride along some of the most insane roads in China but one thing I’m not happy to do is bungee jump or fly through the air on a flying fox. Sometime during the past decade I developed the theory that I really do love life and that here in China I would rather have solid ground beneath my feet than trust a Chinese cable that is linked between two mountains.

This also includes most theme park rides along with patting dangerous animals but for some reason it doesn’t include suspension bridges and I have tried to understand my reasoning behind such a silly idea but have come to no reasonable conclusion.

A suspension bridge has only one extra cable attached to it and god knows how old the wooden planks are but I guess I like something solid beneath my feet. Anyhow, Sarah made it across alive and we spent time exploring the northern side of the river before crossing back to the park and slowly making our way back towards the main gate. Half way we came across a temple that had its doors closed to us and just as we were about to move on one of the monks appeared from out of nowhere, ushered us in and after a small donation he went about opening the doors to several of the buildings for us.

As darkness approached took the bridge across the river from where we caught the bus back to Hanzhong city. By the time we arrived we were both so hungry that we could have eaten…the…um…feet off a low flying duck. Luckily for me and not so for Sarah (being a vegetarian) Hanzhong was hosting the &#8216;First Hanzhong Delicious Food Festival’ and yes &#8216;delicious’ was included in the title. Here we met Nicko McDude and Aussie Brad and his squeeze Happy Mickey and for the next hour we raced from stall to stall (most of which were meat based) feasting on bbq sticks full of meat, fish and rice and noodle based delights. For the more adventurous there were scorpions and big hairy fried spiders which even I decided I could do without and to top it all off was a tray of delicious fried ice cream.

I was more than happy to find fried ice cream as I haven’t tasted it for about a decade!

The perfect end to a perfect day and for Chinese history buffs spending an afternoon at the &#8216;Shimen Plank Road’ is a great way to pass your time and from my understanding the &#8216;Shimen’ part of the Boaxie Road is actually the name of an ancient stone gate that can now be found beneath the dam waters but of course I could be wrong, it happens sometimes, many times, quite a lot actually but on my behalf, the entrance ticket reads &#8216;Shimen Plank Road’.

Six to one, half a dozen of the other, in the end it really doesn’t matter as we had a fantastic day which ended with spending time with good friends, eating delicious food and drinking cold beer. Below is some information on several of the Plank Roads that linked Sichuan and Shaanxi Province through some of the most rugged terrain, all built by the hands of ancient locals and allowed communication to pass between both areas.

<u>The History of the Plank Roads </u>

To the north of Hanzhong lays the protective screen of the Qinling Mountains and to the south the dangerous and difficult Ba Mountains, together making the Hanzhong Basin a closed geographic area. The ancients increasingly expanded their territory and after making explorations through the Qin and Ba mountains opened up many paths for communication and traffic. The different tracks across the Qinling included the Ziwu road, the Tangluo road, the Baoxie road and the Old Road (the Chencang road). Passing through the Ba Mountains were the Jinniu (or "Golden Ox") road, the Micang (or "Rice Granary") road and the Yangba (or "Lychee") minor road.

These seven roads are generally known as the Shu roads.

Ancient Plank Roads refer to the ancient passages built along mountains and cliffs by cutting holes in the cliff and inserting wooden beams on which planks were laid to make a passage. Wooden railings were erected alongside to ensure the safety of people and horses. Its history can be traced back to the Warring States Periods (476 BC-221 BC) and during both the Qin (221 BC-206 BC) and Han Dynasties (206BC-220) Dynasties construction was expanded.

A famous old Chinese saying goes;The way to Sichuan is harder than climbing to the sky and it is not an exaggeration.

For thousands of years the Qinling Mountain acted as a huge barrier blocking the way from Shaanxi to Sichuan. Finally the local people figured out that the best way between were to build plank roads through the mountains, sadly though most were burnt during wars or have decayed through the years.

Among the countless ancient plank roads the Baoxie Plank Road is the most famous and has the longest history. The south mouth of the valley was called Bao and the north was called Xie, thus the plank road was named Baoxie. It was one hundred and forty six miles long and the original was destroyed leaving only holes in the mountain sides. A tunnel, measuring 17.8 yards long and 4.6 yards wide is now regarded as the first traffic tunnel in the world. Inside the tunnel and on the cliff beside Baohe River famous officials and scholars in ancient times left many autographs and poems which were later moved for safe-keeping to Hanzhong Museum due to the construction of the dam.

In 1996 the locals restored six hundred and fifty six yards of the old site and constructed a park that now houses the Mountain Gate, Fengyu Pavilion, Cuiyun Pavilion and a chain bridge known as Lovers Bridge.</b>

The following is an inscription entitled "Rules for Road Etiquette."<b><b>It is the earliest example of &#8216;Rules of the Road’ found in China. </b>

The harsh Qin built this post station, [i][i][i][i][i] Water is plentiful in the station well, [i] Countless canes of bamboo are growing, [i] Together with great numbers of pear trees. [i] Four years and three and one half months, [i] A time of new (bamboo) shoots and late flowers, [i] Longing to go again over the mountains in the East.[/i][/i][/i][/i][/i][/i][/i][/i][/i][/i]

Beers N Noodles toya…..shane ___________________________________________________________

The soundtrack to this entry was by the Celebate Rifles The album was &#8216;Blind Ear' ____________________________________________________________

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival


Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Baoxie-Shimen Plank Road &#38;amp; Delicious Food Festival

Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)

Hanzhong Hantai Museum & Ancient Alter Ruins

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya,

How much of a relief is it to find out that you aren’t pregnant! I was so worried about it too!

Tuesday I got a message from Buckland’s that I needed to go for my yearly Visa Medical and as we had all forgotten about it, it was a last minute four hour dash through the mountains to Xian City where after checking in to my usual hotel I had a late night dinner and a few beers with some happy Backpackers at the hostel. Wednesday morning found Frank (Buckland’s) and I making our way from room to room at the Entry & Exit Hospital and while I was in line waiting to have my inners scanned I met a beautiful girl named Jenny who is in the process of getting her passport to move to Singapore to work in a friend’s grand hotel. She interpreted what the scanning doctors were trying to tell me and I came to the conclusion that I wasn’t pregnant which instantly had the room in hysterics.

Without a bun in the oven and with a stomach full of a delicious lunch I grabbed a bus from Xian’s South Bus Station and with thoughts of future Beers N Noodles running through my mind I retraced the previous nights pathway.

As the weather has been perfect bike riding both Brad and I can be found out and about at every opportunity possible doing our best to locate some of the historical sites hidden away behind the cities modernish facades. When hunger sets in we head for the nearest street corner night food market and fill up on whatever dish or dishes look the most delicious. Over the past week or so I’ve been doing my best to create a list of things to see and do in the Hanzhong area and I have found quite a few sites that not only look impressive but are chockablock full of history.

<u>Below are two such sites.</u>

We knew there was famous museum somewhere close to where we live but strangely we hadn’t come across it during any of our rides. When I was in the taxi heading to the bus station (to Xian) I spotted a ticket office at street level and when I looked up I saw what I thought was a beautiful temple. Today after classes we grabbed our Chinese Plod Along bikes (now named Ying & Yang), off we went and what we found was a dream for anyone who loves their camera and history and where better than in the grounds of what once was an ancient palace to learn about your local history.

The museum costs Thirty Yuan to enter and not only are the grounds beautiful but the buildings are also right up there on the 'would you look at that’ scale here in China.

I wasn’t’ going to add in the &#8216;Baijiang Ancient Alter Ruins’ as the day we visited them was cloudy and grey and both Brad and I found them to be rather dull and boring. On the other hand from pictures in the brochure along with some in the Ticket Office (also known as the Punch Office in Chinglish!) it looks as though it transforms into a theme park (possibly only during the high tourist season) with shows full of beautiful girls in traditional clothes etc so I’m thinking it will be well worth checking it out over summer depending on whether I stay at the same school.

<u>Ancient Hantai (Hanzhong Museum)</u>

In 206 BC the Qin Dynasty (221 BC-206BC) was overthrown by a peasant revolt and Xiang Yu (the armies leader) proclaimed himself the ruler of China and then named Liu Bang the Han King of the Hanzhong area. Liu Bang treated his army well, was soon joined by the masses and in the following years he fought and finally defeated Xiang Yu and united China for the first time.

This was also the beginnings of the Han Dynasty (206 BC-220 AD).

The Hanzhong Museum is in an area called Hantai which was the original centre of Nanzheng (Hanzhong) and is built on the site of the ancient palace of the first Han Emperor Han Gaozu and is located in the southern section of the city. It is a beautiful site and houses many cultural treasures from around the area. The Hantai was a rammed earth construction in the style of the Qin royal court and faced south. The palace mainly consists of three mesas, rises via steps northwards, is seven-meter (23 feet) high and covers an area of about fourteen thousand square meters.

From the time of the Song Dynasty (960-1279) the Hantai was a pleasure ground for governmental officials in Hanzhong. Many complementary buildings were built during the following centuries which include the three-storied Wangjiang Tower (Facing River Tower) which has become a famous architectural site in Hanzhong with its unique style and graceful charm. To the south is a hall where cherry bays planted during the Han Dynasty can be found filling the air with perfume in autumn and several delicate pavilions and pools add spice to this majestic palace which also houses around twelve thousand relics. It is comprised of six display rooms containing stone inscriptions, excavated cultural relics, ancient paintings and calligraphy, modern history of Hanzhong, ancient fossils and religious statues but the most famous is the;

<u>Baoxie Ancient Plank Road Exhibition Hall</u>

To the north of Hanzhong lays the protective screen of the Qinling Mountains and to the south the dangerous and difficult Ba Mountains, together making the Hanzhong Basin a closed geographic area. The ancients increasingly expanded their territory and after making explorations through the Qin and Ba mountains opened up many paths for communication and traffic. The different tracks across the Qinling included the Ziwu Road, the Tangluo Road, the Baoxie Road and the Old Road (the Chencang road).

Passing through the Ba Mountains were the Jinniu Road ("Golden Ox"), the Micang Road ("Rice Granary") and the Yangba Road ("Lychee"). These seven roads are generally known as the Shu Roads.

The original Room has now been subdivided into sections on traffic engineering, postal stations and the poetry associated with the ancient carriageways. These reinforce the idea that although the Baoxie Road was a traffic route that for many years provided the main artery for traffic across the Qinling it was also a cultural pathway. Here, you can gain an appreciation of the different engineering structures of the past, of the claims of Baocheng to be the first among the postal stations of the Tang period, as well as enjoy the wonderful sight of the poetry and songs, stone stele and Plank Road scroll paintings.

I plan on visiting the plank road site sometime in the next couple of weeks. More on the above in one of my next blog!

<u>Hanzhong Baijiang Ancient Alter Ruins</u>

The following I have copied directly from the sites brochure. It &#8216;kind of’ gets the point across along with being fun trying to make sense of it all….enjoy.

Beginning constructs in 206 BC it is an ancient alter historical remains that is built by Liu Bang, the first founder. After he elected a good date, ate vegetarian meal without meat or wine set up the alter. The field, aritual and does obisance Han Xin for senior general. It is Shaanxi Province key cultural relic preservation oran. After Han Xin is done obeisance the senior general, he led his soldiers clearly repair the plank road darkness. Chen warehouse, fights among rivals for the throne.

Therefore Baijiang Alter is the Chinese Dynasty birthplace, also entrusts with heavy responsibility the talented person without restraint of style, results in the talented person to result in the world historical witness.

Baijiang Alter has been through repeatedly the world the millennium to obtain has restored many times, present area 50,500 square meters, floor space 43,500 square meters. Forms take Beijiang Alter the world ruins as the core, has the stronghold gate, the checkerboard square, the Taiwan waterside pavilion, the observation post in the style of antiquity and so on imitates the Chinese architectural complex and ancient constructs the botanical garden landscare graceful and friendly disposition. It is the Chinese and foreign tourist visits antiquities visits scenic sites with the scenery travelling is a body of high grade outstanding scenic site.

Beers N Noodles toya…..shane ___________________________________________________________

The soundtrack to this entry was by Iron Maiden The albums were &#8216;Number of the Beast & Live After Death’ OHHH YEAH! Scream for me Long Beach! ____________________________________________________________

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Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)

First Rides Out N About In The Hanzhong Fields

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya,

The Long March began in October 1933.

Many of the communist troupes had begun disregarding Mao's authority and instead took the advice of those who advocated meeting Chiang’s troops in pitched battles. This strategy proved disastrous. By October 1934 the communists had suffered heavy losses and were hemmed into a small area in Jiangxi Province. On the brink of defeat, the communists decided to retreat from Jiangxi Province and March north to Shaanxi Province to join up with other communist armies from Shaanxi, Gansu and Ningxia Provinces.

For those wondering what in the world this has to do with my current blog think of my poor summer wardrobe which has been hemmed into the back corner of my wardrobe which of course includes my riding gear. Besides the coming onslaught of summer tiny denim shorts and high heels what else makes a man happy?

Yellow fields full of rape seed, village dramas, small ancestral temples and a set of peddles!

To all my friends in opposite parts of the world, clean your pipes stock your wood piles and prepare yourselves for winter because as of now we will begin to steal your sunshine. As you experience less and add extra layers I will be turning up my fridge to keep my beer at a more humane drinking level to that of the summer room temperature that the Chinese grossly drink theirs. Yes my friends, the bees are buzzing, the birds are singing and the last several nights have brought forth the first few unmistakable, yet still un-annoying ZZZZZzzzz of the mosquito.

The weather here in northern China is almost perfect and reminds me of a typical spring day back home.

The early morning greets us with a big blue sunny sky yet they are still crisp and cool. Mid morning introduces warmth and by mid afternoon we are all dancing around the school yard in summer bliss. These then folds into a crispy yet warm evening that holds us in its trance leaving us unwilling to lay our heads upon our waiting pillows.

For those who didn’t read my last blog…last week after being told our bikes had been delivered Brad raced up to my apartment, threw my lock keys at me and gave me the news I had been waiting for, the delivery of my peddles. After jumping for joy we both raced down to the bike shed and began searching for two mountain bikes. After finding none we began thinking that both bikes had been stolen, this was until the Headmistress came over to show us our new bikes and being a huge bike rider my heart sank at what we were shown.

Two tiny Chinese 'Plod Along’ bikes, both with no gears and a little wire basket on the front.

As I’ve killed almost every bike I’ve had over the past five years I felt like saying 'hey big bee hive haired Dudette where are our real bikes’, but instead we both agreed that a Plod Along one geared bike is better than no bike at all so we smiled and buggered off for the first of many rides over the past several weeks. Since then both of us have been out each night after classes exploring as much of the city as possible. Last weekend Brad headed back to Ankang city to visit his girlfriend so English Sarah and I decided to put foot to peddle and spend Saturday out in the fields.

Sarah being only new in China, got to witness her first rural village Drama/Musical of yesteryear.

As we were riding I heard the usual sounds of what sounds like a cat being strangled so with a smile I steered us both in the direction of the high pitched skin peeling sounds of several erhu’s, several tiny tightly skinned drums and other strange Chinese instruments and asked if Sarah if she wanted to check it out. We were welcomed with huge friendly village smiles, given front row seats in the one row audience and an offering of green tea.

I’m unsure what happened to the green tea but Sarah was a little bemused at what she saw and heard.

After waving our good byes we cleared both our heads and our ears and continued to make our way back towards the city. We spent the evening with Matt and Megan, a delightful American couple who have been here teaching for Auston English for the past (I think) six months and of course happy Aussie/NZ Nicko Mc Dude. Sorry Nicko, but whenever I hear the name Nicko I can’t help but think of Nicko McBrain and whenever I’m introduced to a Nicko I can’t stop myself from adding a Mc Sumthing to the end of their name. For those who don’t know Michael Henry &#8216;Nicko’ McBrain was the old drummer for Iron Maiden back in the good old days that included the Powerslave tour which was not only one of my first &#8216;real’ concerts but still remains one of the best gigs I’ve seen to this day!

So Hanzhong, it’s no Shaowu city just as Shaanxi Province is no Fujian or Guangxi Province but for now it will do.

I feel happy here and am totally enjoying being around another Aussie as it’s great to feel free to be sarcastic, take the piss and be totally understood on any given topic of choice no matter how random or stupid it is. As for riding, thankfully the city is built on a huge flat so for the moment having a one geared bike really isn’t so bad. It has been awesome to be back in the saddle again but I can see that I will get a little bored riding here as I love riding mountains and here the mountains are like, way over there. Also the villages are all very similar and within sight of each other so it feels like there is really nothing to explore. This feeling though I am sure will change once I do begin riding way over there to the mountains and do my best with my one geared bike to explore. In a week or so it will be April and believe it or not there will then be only three months left until the 2010 Summer Beers N Noodles Adventure…bring it on!

So for now the winter woolly’s lay piled in the corner of my room waiting to be washed yet remain so in case of a one off here and there cold snap we may experience.

The summer microfiber wardrobe has begun to call and has started a long March of its own which of course started in Guangdong/Jiangxi Provinces (during the Winter Beers N Noodles Adventure) and will also end in Shaanxi Province just as it did back in 1934. But instead of bringing together people such as Mao Zedong (Chairman Mao), Lin Biao and Deng Xiaoping it will simply bring together my feet and my sandals. There will be no inhospitable terrain, no loss of seventy thousand lives, no guerrilla groups to harass the enemy, no fatigue, sickness, exposure, enema y attacks and desertion.

Instead there will be huge summer smiles and cold beers. Instead of several Long March’s there will be uncountable Long Bike Rides!

Beers N Noodles toya…..shane ___________________________________________________________

The soundtrack to this entry was by The Gorillaz The album was &#8216;Demon Days’. ____________________________________________________________

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Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)

My New Life & Adventure In The South West

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya,

What started off as a questionable place to live and teach has become rather comfortable.

Tension causing 'things’ have been raised and dealt with, life has moved on and both Aussie Brad and I are actually beginning to really like both the school and the area we will both share for the next term and if it stays that way I doubt I will have a problem staying longer. We have gone from not being able to find any bars to almost tripping over them each time we are out walking and the same goes for fellow foreigners as there is supposed to be around twenty of us wide eyed freaks living here.

So where is here? I can now be found slurping my noodles and drinking my cold beer in Hanzhong city.

The shire was established around two thousand four hundred years ago by the Qin Kingdom during the Warring States Period (476BC-221BC). It is the birthplace of the Han Dynasty (206BC-220AD) and served as the main battlefield between the Wei force and Shu force during the Three Kingdoms Period (AD220-280). The city is located in the southwest of Shaanxi Province and lies to the south of the Qinling Mountains, north of the Daba Mountains with the Hanzhong Basin in the center.

It is bounded on the southwest by Gansu and Sichuan provinces, my beloved ancient walled city of Xian is around four hours to the northeast, the city gained its name from the Han River which runs through the southern part of the city and it is the administrative capital of Southwestern Shaanxi.

Supposedly there are year round snowcapped mountains, vast forests and many rivers that tumble towards the Hanzhong basin below. When I first arrived and spotted the KFC I thought the city was going to be much too large for me to feel at home on my peddles but thankfully over the past two weeks I have found that it really isn’t that large at all and is relatively small with a population of around two hundred thousand.

The majority of the community is Han Chinese but Hui, Mongol, Qiang, Tibetan and Xinjiang Minority Peoples can all be found living here.

The city itself displays its borderland heritage and has an entirely different feel than those of the rest of Shaanxi. Sichuanese influence is evident in the dialect, food, and tea culture that exist in the city. There are numerous indoor and outdoor markets to be found throughout town where anything from yarn, spices, vegetables, dried snakes, handicrafts and animals can be bought or traded. There is a small but modern city center, however the atmosphere and general layout of Hanzhong is more of an historic mountain outpost with winding alleys, fading tenement and community minded residents.

After a bitter cold winter the weather over the past few days has finally warmed to my affection. Sadly though, when I was speaking to Luo Wei several nights ago it was still snowing in her part of Shaanxi.

Thankfully though from what I can gather I should be in for a good ride here as the city is situated in the transition area between warm temperate zone and subtropical zone and has moderately humid weather in summer and the winter wind current coming from North China is blocked by the Qinling Mountains so winter (if I stay longer than this term) is relatively warmer than where I was in Shangzhou city which was several hours into the Qinling mountains three hours south east of Xian city. The rainy season usually appears during June and lasts until September during which this year I should be found packing around Cambodia and Laos (depending on money) or in the south of China in Hunan and Guizhou Provinces.

For Chinese food buffs and a big Sorry Mate to Aussie Crusty;

The food here is a delicious blend of Shaanxi and Sichuan styles which means that it can be explosively hot or a more comfortable hot that actually leaves you with taste buds allowing you to enjoy your next meal and as usual here in China, there are a million restaurants all over town and the local street food is also a mixture of both Sichuan and Shaanxi styles. Thankfully Western food is mostly limited to one KFC but from what I can gather from the small Coffee Shop Culture that has recently crept in there should be a couple of places experimenting with pizzas, steak and salads.

I've been checking out the internet for things to do and see and due to its history there handfuls of historical sites along with more than enough natural beauty to see so I'm hoping to check out a heap of them over the next few months and show the world what the Hanzhong Area has to offer.

So what have I been up to over the past few weeks?

After arriving we were taken in to the head masters office and handed the contract etc (which were in both English and Chinese) and he had to blow his golden trumpet and go through each part in Chinese and then have a Chinese English Teacher interpret it for us. Not long after he started Brad and I had had enough and I soon asked for a stop to the trumpet blowing as we both of course could read English and he soon moved on to the &#8216;do's and don'ts’ which is normal. This school though has a bad reputation with many of its past foreign teachers and one of the main reasons is that they were treated like young children. In the past they have been made to return to the school by 9:30pm and if they didn’t the following day they were called in for a meeting with the big guy.

Being older males we were told that we must be home by ten and I once again cut it short and told them that we were both very well travelled and had been to more places in China than all of them put together and there was no way that either of us would be bound by such nonsense.

There have also supposedly been a lot of problems with the Chinese English Teachers taking over the foreign teachers classes and treating them as their own along with the school using insanely hard class books. When I was given my books my jaw dropped and I was shocked at what I was supposed to teach Grade five and six. Then after finding out that the Chinese English Teachers used a different books (which are used for the exams) I told them they were crazy and wasting not only my time but also the students time and I quickly refused to use the books and have been teaching my own classes which I have been teaching for the past five years and ever since the kids have been loving their new found freedom of thought and expression and we have been having so much fun together.

Our apartments are new and everything within their walls is either new or almost new.

Best of all is the fact that we are the only two people (besides the Gate Man) who live at the school so our music won't bother anyone and both being huge music fans this is more than a huge bonus. I've gone from twenty three lessons a week down to eighteen which is much more comfortable on the throat but not so comfortable on the back pocket. Aussie Brad is teaching Grades one to three and I'm teaching Grades three to Grade six and though I love my timetable the only problem with it is that for the first time in many years we both have Friday afternoon classes. Most foreign teachers usually have only Friday morning classes, which then allows them to scamper for the weekend to far off places.

After receiving my timetable I couldn’t help but wonder if the controlling headmaster made sure that all teachers here work Friday afternoon which then makes it almost impossible to have a weekend away.

It’s not so bad as Hanzhong lies on the main rail line between Chengdu and Xian and express busses to Xian take around four hours and supposedly heading south over the mountains into Sichuan takes around the same. So depending on when the last bus leaves to a future chosen destination I should be able to pocket some further away sites as well as the local ones.

How will all of the above effect my bike riding?

Several days ago Brad was told that our bikes had been delivered so Brad raced up to my apartment and threw my lock keys at me and of course I jumped for joy. We then happy raced down to the bike shed and began searching for two mountain bikes. After finding none we began thinking that our bikes had been stolen until the Headmistress came over to show us our new bikes. Being a huge bike rider my heart sank at what was shown to us which was two tiny Chinese &#8216;Plod Along’ bikes, both with no gears and a little wire basket on the front. As I’ve killed almost every bike I’ve had over the past five years I felt like having my say but we both I agreed that a Plod Along one geared bike is better than no bike at all so we smiled and buggered off for our first ride which found us a few hours away in the south eastern hills.

We both felt instantly at home and agreed that if things continue as they are, life will be good here!

Brad and I are very similar in many ways, we both love exploring and I was extremely happy when I found that he loved both walking and riding continuously for more hours than most and we are more than happy to be part of an English Teaching team that is full to the brim of beautiful Chinese women. We have met up with several of the other foreigners and had a night or two swapping stories over beer and Sichuan/Shaanxi style food at a local bar. We also have a city that is full of ancient alleyways that take us from the Muslim quarter down to the ancient river side streets.

More than anything though is the fact that the city streets are crowded with food markets and beer. Beers N Noodles toya…..shane

PS: The bowl of noodles you see in the pictures below, after five years of searching for the most delicious bowl of noodles in China, besides the Fujian 'Lanzhou Beef Noodles' I'm thinking that this is very much THE most delicious bowl of noodles I have ever had in China and I have been slurping my way from the east coast all throughout this big noodle bowl of a country.

Surprisingly found in a very tiny noodle eatery just off West Street here in Hanzhong City.

PSS: Some how the Chinese have found a way to block Hot Spot Shield so I no longer have access to Facebook and it is doubtful I will have in the future....oh well, it was good while it lasted. ___________________________________________________________

The soundtrack to this entry was by Daft Punk The album was &#8216;Discovery’ ____________________________________________________________

First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

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First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City


First Adventures  Around Hanzhong City

First Adventures Around Hanzhong City

Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)