A Travellerspoint blog

February 2013

The 2013 Winter Beers N Noodles Adventure Ends

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya,

I love my sandals. Each day I became quite attached to them.

After three years of taking me all over China and having my smelly feet inside ten months a year I just had to take my sandals 'A Bridge Too Far’. As we have travelled so far together and for so long I thought I’d pay them their due respects with their own blog.

Besides my love of having my feet have their own freedom most people don’t actually know why sandals are my chosen footwear. During my Beers N Noodles Adventures there is always a time period when I mention that I can barely walk, this is due to my right toe knuckle joint being twice the size of my left and if it doesn’t ‘click’ at some stage it then kind of just locks for awhile which then makes it extremely difficult to walk for six hours each day. I do my best to get at least four in and for some reason it kind of gets a little larger as each walking year passes.

Buying actual shoes is a total nightmare. Take this evening for instance.

Still being winter I walked around for hours in my broken sandals visiting a billion shoe stores and no store had a single pair of sandals. All the store girls tried to sell me ‘shoes’ and when I showed them my sandals and they looked at me strangely (sadly) and told me that it was winter.

What is it with that?

People do wear sandals in winter too you know, there must me thousands of us all over the globe in search of sandals when broken and whilst living through the total pain and frustration of non-supply all dream of that yearly winter Sandal Convention that surely must be held somewhere we don’t know.

As usual I tried on three trillion pairs and types of sneakers (runners for those other strange English speakers & tracks for ‘that other group’) all costing from five hundred to one thousand Yuan (I walk much more than the average Joe Wang) and not a single pair were comfortable. My sandals/shoes need to ride, walk, climb mountains and teach so to actually fix the problem I need to purchase two pairs, one normal pair for my left foot and one several sizes larger for my right foot.

Problem is what to do with the left over two shoes? I see a new Disney movie coming out of this!

Anyhow the only pair I found, were a strange Kungfu looking pair of ‘things’ that though are extremely comfortable will probably last a month or two as they cost less than one hundred Yuan and in no way will survive several bike rides. I do like them and surely they give me a certain ‘air’ as when people see them on my feet the first thing that must come to mind is Bruce Lee…or, what the hell are they! Actually I’m not really betting on the Bruce Lee thing and if anything, groups of people will probably surround me and taunt me for wearing such strange looking footwear.

I’ll then disrobe my big toe and they will fall to my feet in awe!

<u>My Sandals End</u>

There we were, together as sole mates walking across the Fu River via Nanchang’s main bridge and all was well with the world. Our step was flighty and full of bounce and then I felt this soft tugging at my left heel.

I looked down and said; What’s wrong little fella? He looked up with a desperate expression; I’m so sorry but I can’t continue! I gave a little snicker and said; It’s only been three years, you’ve got another one in you.

We continued for another five minutes and I began to feel that same tugging and just as I was going to offer more words of encouragement his life ended in mid stride. I watch as his sole broke free and flew from his body and I stopped, looked at the heavens above, fell to my knees and screamed;

NOOOOOO! Why here, why now! You little bastard, you’ve got to be kidding! You couldn’t have bloody died when I was in the damn Mall!

<u>The 2013 Hainan Beers N Noodles Adventures End</u>

We became attached at the very beginning of the 2010 Summer Beers N Noodles Adventure and they walked me right through until the very last day of the 2013 Winter Beers N Noodles Adventure and that’s a mighty feat for anything that becomes attached my feet.

So that ends the 2013 Tropical Hainan Island Beers N Noodles Adventure.

It was totally awesome to catch up with Aussie Judy for the first time in six and a half years, share Beers N Fresh Seafood and discover parts of Hainan Island together. Another HUGE THANKS goes to my boss and friend Owen Buckland for the accommodation in his Successful English Training Centre

It was the perfect place to be as it is right there in the middle of Sanya City complete with a vibrant night food market at its feet. Owen had offered his accommodation many times over the past and even though I have always wanted to visit Hainan Island each time I read about the surging prices, the amount of people etc I always gave it a miss. I was so glad that this winter I did actually accept. I will return to Hainan but it will be during summer when it is too hot for most and then I can freely travel the east coast and bays paying normal prices, know for sure that I will have accommodation and actually leave the island anytime I damn well please.

<u>Ode To My Sandals</u>

Ye Sandals Ye Sandals Ye Sandals How far did we walk? I really want to know But they no longer talk

Ye Sandals Ye Sandals Ye Sandals

All those memories Tomorrow left behind New shells now clad my feet New memories together we shall meet Oh Ye Sandals I think I thank Beers N Noodles for your stink!

Beers N Noodles toya…..shane PS: the photos for this entry a from my walk across Nanchang's main Bridge and back again. ___________________________________________________________

The soundtrack to this entry was by Faith No More The album/song was &#8216;Digging The Grave’ ____________________________________________________________

A Bridge Too Far

A Bridge Too Far


A Bridge Too Far

A Bridge Too Far


A Bridge Too Far

A Bridge Too Far


A Bridge Too Far

A Bridge Too Far


A Bridge Too Far

A Bridge Too Far


A Bridge Too Far

A Bridge Too Far


A Bridge Too Far

A Bridge Too Far


A Bridge Too Far

A Bridge Too Far


A Bridge Too Far

A Bridge Too Far


A Bridge Too Far

A Bridge Too Far


A Bridge Too Far

A Bridge Too Far


A Bridge Too Far

A Bridge Too Far


A Bridge Too Far

A Bridge Too Far


A Bridge Too Far

A Bridge Too Far


A Bridge Too Far

A Bridge Too Far


A Bridge Too Far

A Bridge Too Far


A Bridge Too Far

A Bridge Too Far


A Bridge Too Far

A Bridge Too Far


A Bridge Too Far

A Bridge Too Far


A Bridge Too Far

A Bridge Too Far


A Bridge Too Far

A Bridge Too Far


A Bridge Too Far

A Bridge Too Far


A Bridge Too Far

A Bridge Too Far


A Bridge Too Far

A Bridge Too Far

Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)

Lakes Parks & Another Snackalishess Adventure

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax


Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Lakes Parks &#38;amp; Many More Snax

Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)

Yellow Cranes, The Yangzi & A Snackalishess Time

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya,

Take me back to Hainan Island…please! I’ll do the dishes every night and eat all my vegetables!

It is cold here and I am so unprepared for this weather but I’m managing the best I can, also trying to cope with all the strange looks I get walking around in sandals but strangely my feet are not cold at all, it’s actually my hands, arms and my head. I grabbed a cheap beanie and pair of gloves from a street stall so today was much better than yesterday. This evening Aunty came knocking on my door and offered me a jacket to wear but my room is as warm as a cocoon so I thanked her and tried to convince her that I really wasn’t cold.

Batteries, I know they deplete yet sometimes I still manage to forget to charge my 'out and about’ charger and sadly today just had to be one of those days.

For some reason my phone didn’t fully charge last night and by the time I walked to and arrived at the Yellow Crane Tower Park only then did I realise my phone was less than half charged. No need to worry I thought, I have my trusty &#8216;out and about’ charger/battery and I can simply attached it to my phone and it will charge as I go but at the time I figured if I take only five hundred thousand photos and not one million I should have enough battery and I’ll attached it on the way to the Guiyuan Temple. After a wonderful few hours slowly walking around the park, chatting to university students and climbing both towers for stunning three hundred and sixty degree views (I can only imagine what they would be like on a sunny day) I began my journey across the bridge and across the mighty Yangzi.

During which I attached my &#8216;out and about’ charger.

Of course the light didn’t come on because I had forgotten to charge it and on the other side of the bridge after paying my two Yuan to take the lift down four flights I entered the riverside park and wallah, just as I took two shots of what I believe to be Hanyang’s East Gate my phone went dead. So the nights shots on this blog are actually from last night, but hey, same Jiefang Road (in Wuchang district) walk and same snackadelica evening and if JiangNi was here I’m sure I would have almost out-snacked even her.

For images of the Guiyuan Temple I’ve added a link to a Yahoo Image page. Problem is they are all so straight and proper and not really Eddakathy at all.

For its size, I really do like Wuhan and I thought about staying one more day but decided against it as Hankou and its Walking Street, Ancient Street and &#8216;Concession Area’ really should be taken in on a humid day with a bright blue sky followed by a hot night sitting at a street BBQ stall eating meaty treats washed down by several too many cold beers. Tomorrow it will rain and my sandals have those crazy drain holes in the sole so this morning I grabbed a ticket and I’ll be busing it to Nanchang city for a day or two before heading back to Dexing town to begin teaching.

Here’s hoping Nanchang will be not only dryer but also much warmer!

<u>Yellow Crane Tower</u>

According to legend, Yellow Crane Tower was built by the family of an old pothouse owner living in Wuhan City named Old Xin. One day, a shabbily dressed Taoist priest came to the pothouse and asked for some wine. Old Xin paid no attention to him, but his son was very kind and gave the Taoist some wine without asking for money. The Taoist priest visited the pothouse regularly for half a year when one day the Taoist said to the son that in order to repay his kindness, he would like to draw a crane on the wall of the pothouse, which would dance at his request. When people in the city heard of this, they flocked to the pothouse to see the dancing crane. The Xin family soon became rich and they built the Yellow Crane Tower as a symbol of gratitude to the Taoist priest.

The Yellow Crane Tower has a very long and complicated history.

It was first built in 223, during the Three Kingdoms Period (220 - 280). Due to the ideal location, it was built by Sun Quan (182 - 252, King of Wu) as a watchtower for his army. After hundreds of years, its military function was gradually forgotten and the tower was enjoyed mainly as a picturesque location. During the Tang Dynasty (618 - 907), many popular poems were written in praise of the Tower. It was these poems that made the Tower so renowned and induced it to the rest of China.

During the following centuries, it was destroyed and rebuilt many times.

During the Ming (1368 - 1644) and Qing (1644 - 1911) Dynasties alone the tower was destroyed and rebuilt seven times. In 1884, it was completely destroyed by fire and was not rebuilt until 1981. The tower had different architectural features during different dynasties; however the tower which stands today is based on the Qing Dynasty design. It stands just over fifty meters high and with five floors and its appearance is the same regardless of the direction it is viewed from. The roof is covered by ten thousand yellow glazed tiles with yellow upturned eaves.

<u>Guiyuan Temple</u> Click Here For Yahoo Pictures of Guiyuan Temple

Guiyuan Buddhist Temple is the fourth largest Buddhist temple in China and ranks among Chinese Buddhism's most important places of worship. Originally built in the early part of the Qing (1644-1911) Dynasty and somehow its many Buddhist Sutras and other important Buddhist relics survived China's tumultuous Cultural Revolution. Even so much of the temple has been repeatedly destroyed and rebuilt throughout its three hundred year history.

The temple which derives its name from a Buddhist chant &#8216;Guided by Original Purity’ (the devotee can achieve anything) is not only renowned for its role in spreading Buddhism, but it is also renowned for its exquisite Han Chinese (Southern Chinese) Buddhist architecture and was 1983 the Chinese Government designated it as one of the key Buddhist temples representing the Han Chinese nationality.

Beers N Noodles toya…..shane ___________________________________________________________

The soundtrack to this entry was by Anberlin The album was &#8216;Never Take Friendship Personal’ ____________________________________________________________

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk


Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Yellow Crane Tower &#38;amp; Yangzi River Walk

Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)

Wuhan Is A Really Big Bugger!`So Far I Love It!

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya,

Flight delays. Seriously, you can’t beat them!

Especially when your flight was supposed to leave at the respectable time of eight in the evening (adding in a stopover in Nanning for refueling etc) and should have arrived around elevenish, which then should leave one free to do the 'hotel shuffle’ and find a decently priced hotel for the following few days. But when your flight is delayed by nearly five hours, means you then arrive at your destination five hours later which would make it at around four in the morning and then there is the normal hour long taxi ride into the city to take in to account.

One then becomes a piece of prime rib for the vultures waiting. Which includes both the taxi driver and sleepy hotel staff.

When I arrived at the Bus/Train station area (4:45am) it was around minus three and there was not a thing open except three large hotels and once spotting a foreigner they doubled their prices on the spot, which meant they wanted six to eight hundred Yuan for a toom and that was only until midday. They then wanted another six to eight hundred Yuan for the night and any further night. My poor taxi driver was devastated and after beginning to speak in &#8216;not so bad’ English called his aunty who met us near the train station as she has her own tiny Guesthouse and was out and about scouting to fill her rooms.

Aunties Guesthouse is so tiny that my single bed fits snugly into my room and when in my little bathroom if I tied mice on my elbows I seriously couldn’t swing them let alone a cat. I have hot water, a squat toilet and TV and do you want to know the extra bonus, I was so awake after chatting for another hour (6am) with Aunty that she went out and came back with four cans of beer and told me that foreigners love to drink beer.

At sixish in the morning I’d disagree. Well, unless it was at the Meredith Music Festival etc!

<u>Now For a Bit On Wuhan & My Day</u>

Wuhan is bloody massive! Seriously, it is so big!

But massive is larger than big so the above should read; Wuhan is so big, seriously it is so massive and it is so because it is actually three river side cities (Wuchang, Hanyang and Hankou) that after growing so large merged into one super city and became known as Wuhan and thanks to the Han River, Yangzi River and the areas many lakes the city is much more comfortable than you may believe. The mighty Yangzi divides the city into two and the Han then divides it into three and all allow for some well needed breathing space between the surrounding skyscrapers and hectic traffic.

In the past many travellers have told me that Wuhan is a super big and boring city.

They knew this because they had only spent an afternoon and a night and used it more for a hub than a stop. I have always questioned this line of thinking as to me this is simply more passing on the same information told to them prior and how would they actually know if Wuhan is super big and boring if they haven’t actually spent time to find out. Honestly let’s get real people! Thankfully others told a completely different story and they were the ones that got amongst it and spent time down its maze of narrow lanes and alleyways, ate at street stalls and BBQ’s and relaxed enough to have a damn fine time.

I only have one and a half days (two and a half at the most depending on the weather &#8211; half a day already used) here this time so I won’t make it across to Hankou where there is a tree lined former concession area along with several pedestrian streets and an ancient street as I believe that would be better experienced in the heat of summer rather than in sandals freezing cold.

OK, back to my day!

After my &#8216;Beery Breakfast’ with Aunty I slept until one and then headed out to begin my day. The plan was several close by temples beginning with the Changchun Taoist Temple just up the road and around the corner a bit. Even though it was close by it took almost an hour to get there as I was starving and filled myself on assorted street snacks along the way and also dropped into the local Chicken Eatery for a coffee. By the time I reached the temple the food and coffee had kicked in and my body began to warm itself. There was a small Temple Fair on and I slowly made my way around the stalls watching as the Chinese purchased &#8216;Good Luck’ charms one after the other, obviously one for each month of the year and others maybe for each hour of the day.

The children had their own stalls where they could throw balls into unbalanced buckets etc and if they did actually get a ball in, you guessed it they won a good luck charm!

On my way west towards Chang Jiang (the Yangzi River) I had planned to visit the Yellow Crane Pavilion as everything I had read about it described it as &#8216;splendidly beautiful’ but the afternoon had almost passed by and I decided that instead of racing through the park to let it wait until tomorrow and hope that it didn’t rain. Instead I spent the rest of the &#8216;light time’ in the &#8216;1911 Uprising Park’.

Which is actually found on the some rather long hill as the Yellow Crane Pavilion.

Once light time was nearing dark time I decided to head down to the Yangzi River which I haven’t set eyes on since my visit to Lu Shan when I spent several days meandering around Juijiang City. I figured that like most sea or riverside towns/cities, the vibrant Snackery/Shopping area would be a block or so in so I began to zigzag my way around getting hungrier by the zig more than the zag and finally I found a crowded market which took me through to Jiefang Lu and here my tongue and stomach decided to make their home for the next several hours. They then took control and made the rest of my body consume countless delicious known and unknown street snacks until they finally lost their grip during an internal argument due to my tongue gloating on the texture of an unknown seafood snack and my stomach having doubts on whether it could actually accommodate it. In the end my brain took control and a time and date for Mediation was set during which a decision of eating only half was reached.

They and the rest of me then walked back to Aunties Guesthouse for an early evening.

<u>Now For a Short History Lesson</u>

Historic relics excavated from ancient tombs tell the city's long history dating back three thousand five hundred years. In the period of Pre-Qin (770 B.C. - 221 B.C.), this was the land of the State of Chu (one of the seven warring states before Qin, in China's first feudal dynasty) and was the cradle of the brilliant Chu Civilization. Starting here, merchants followed the great Yangtze River and lake network to expand businesses throughout the entire country.

In the Qing Dynasty, Hankou became one of the four best known towns in the country.

Wuhan was first opened to foreign trade in 1861, after the Second Opium War, when the British extracted rights to a foreign concession in Hankou. In 1889, the Governor-General, Zhang Zhidong, embarked on a program of industrial modernisation and education which laid the groundwork for Wuchan to become a modern industrial city. In October, 1911, the Wuhan Uprising launched the revolution that overthrew the Qing Dynasty and ended imperial rule in China. In 1927, threatened by the Japanese, the Kuomintang moved the central government to Wuhan. In 1938, the city was taken by the Japanese and became a major logistics center for their operations in southern China. In December 1944, the city was largely destroyed in firebombing raids conducted by the United States 14th Army Air Force. In 1967, civil strife struck the city in the Wuhan Incident, as a result of tension brought on by the Cultural Revolution.

<u>Changchun Taoist Temple</u>

During the reign of Genghis Khan, Emperor Taizu of the Yuan Dynasty built a temple to cultivate Dao and as his literary name was &#8216;Eternal Spring’, the temple became known as &#8216;Changchun Temple’ and became the most famous Daoist Temple in Hubei. It had several hundred houses, several thousand devotees and a large quantity of pilgrims. During the Qing dynasty (in 1851), the temple was destroyed by war and in 1864, He Hechun came from Wudang Mountain and rebuilt it in the current Ming Dynasty style.

Sadly most of the religious relics were destroyed during the Cultural Revolution. Beers N Noodles toya…..shane ___________________________________________________________

The soundtrack to this entry was by The Tea Party The album was &#8216;Splendor Solis’ ____________________________________________________________

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park


Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Changchun Temple &#38;amp; 1911 Uprising Park

Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)

A Temply Tomb Adventure

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya,

Man travelling during Spring Festival is frustrating!

11:00am Me: Two tickets to Haikou please. She: There’s a train at 18:40 this evening. Me: But it’s only a two hour train ride, they leave every half an hour or so. She: yes. Me: yes…um…no…um…what? She: There is a train at 18:40 this evening. Me: um, I don’t understand. She: Do you want two tickets? Me: I guess I do.

21:00pm Judy: Do you have the address for the hotel? Me: Yes, I took a screen shot of the booking. Judy: Ok, show the taxi guy. Me: I can’t because my stupid phone won’t show the shot. Judy: Why? Me: I have no idea it’s never done this before. Judy: It’s ok. I have it on my camera too. Pity her camera had the tiniest screen known to man as no one could read it.

22:00pm We finally found someone who could read her camera screen. Me: I need a beer and this is why I never book anything online. Judy: Shut up or I’m going to kill you in your sleep! Me: Yep, I’m thinking I’d better shut up or I won’t get my beer!

So anyhow, after a wonderful two weeks in beautiful Sanya city with my mate Aussie Judy riding from golden beach to golden beach, lashing out on fresh sea food BBQ’s, arm sized fish, huge scallops and drinking buckets of cold beer it all came to an end yesterday morning when she grabbed her pack and a cab and began her multi flight journey home to Australia.

Huge hotels, did I ever tell you how much don’t like huge three to five star hotels?

Lifeless horrid things they are, especially when they are in the dry armpit of town next to the ring road without a single store nearby. Thankfully at the foot of the huge hotel there was an outdoor BBQ that cooked up some of the most almost un-eatable BBQ you would never want to eat (some nights it was not so bad). It was so weird as the BBQ staff raced around frustrated like they were in a huge restaurant but there was only five or so small tables which were mostly empty.

I had the option of staying in a huge plush hotel in the dry armpit of town for the same price as a small hotel 'in town’, this morning I packed and grabbed a Motorbike Guy (local taxi) and headed to the vibrant part of town. Yesterday I finally got my &#8216;off the island’ ticket sorted. I hadn’t bothered prior as I had decided to head to Guangzhou City (Canton) and then grab a bus a little north to south Jiangxi Province to spend several days checking out some more huge Hakka Peoples houses, but it seems tickets out of Haikou and off Hainan Island in general are at a standstill.

Today is the February 18th. There weren’t even flights available to Guangzhou until the 22nd. Flights to Nanchang (where I began my holiday), nothing until the 25th. There were no bus tickets, no train tickets and no plane tickets available anywhere!

In the end I said I will take any flight ticket that takes me off Hainan Island and after waiting for over three hours a ticket to Wuhan City became available as Woo Hoo, tomorrow somebody didn’t want to fly north and I do so I snapped it up and I’m out of here. I will have to wear thermals again but I have them packed!

<u>Wugong Temple (Five Officials Temple)</u>

Wugong Temple is located on the boundary of Haikou and Qiongshan. Five well known officials were banished to Hainan in the Tang and Song dynasties; Li Deyu, Li Gang, Li Guang, Zhao Ding and Hu Quan and the temple was built in their honor. Next to the memorial is &#8216;Official Su's Temple’ in memory of the great poet and writer, Su Dongpo (who was also banished to Hainan) and his son Su Guo.

The temple was built around 1590 AD, during the reign of Emperor Wanli in the Ming Dynasty. It has since been rebuilt during the reign of Emperor Guangxu in the Qing Dynasty and has been renovated several times since with the inclusion of gardens, ponds and pavilions to beautify the area.

<u>Su Dong Po Temple</u>

Su Dong Po Temple is located in the east of the Wugong Temple and was built during the Ming Dynasty and is used to offer prayers to Su Dongpo, who greatly improved the locals cultural and historic education. When Su Dongpo was banished to the island, he took into consideration the lives of the local people and after he became aware of the difficulty of getting drinking water, he began to dig Fusuquan (Floating Millet Spring) and the Xixinquan (Cleaning Heart Spring). The water in the Floating Millet Spring is sweet and clear. Its surface is suffused with small bubbles, which look like the seeds of millet. Accordingly it was named Floating Millet Spring.

<u>Tomb of Hai Rui (Hairui Mu)</u>

The Tomb of Hai Rui is found in a small park in Biya Village and was built in 1589 AD during the reign of emperor Wanli in the Ming dynasty and though the park/tomb area is very small when compared to other attractions it is still a pleasant place to visit.

Hairui was a Chinese official during the Ming Dynasty and is greatly remembered as a model of honesty and integrity in office, his actual tomb is a simple mound and legend has it that, when the pall bearers were transporting his remains here, one of the ropes broke and the coffin fell to the ground. The workers decided that this is where Hairui wanted to be interred, so they buried him on that spot.

<u>Now For a Bit of Haikou History</u>

Located at the North of Hainan is the islands capital, Haikou city and with an estimated population of one million eight hundred thousand it is easily the largest city on the island. Named &#8216;Haikoupu’ in ancient times, during the Ming Dynasty, it was fortified as &#8216;Haikousuo’.

Haikou originally served as the port for Qiongshan, the ancient administrative capital of Hainan Island, located five kilometers inland and was once part of Guangdong province. In the 13th century it was fortified and became a military post under the Ming dynasty (1368&#8211;1644). When Qiongshan was opened to foreign trade under the Treaty of Tianjin (1858) Haikou started to rival the old administrative city and in 1926, Haikou overtook Qiongshan in population in the 1930s after it was declared a separate administrative county.

Haikou was developed as a port during the Sino-Japanese War (1937&#8211;45) when the Japanese invaded and occupied Hainan Island from early 1939 to 1945.

Old Haikou (the oldest buildings in the area) was mostly built by the rich Chinese from the mainland and some overseas Chinese who returned to their homeland. The houses are mixture of Portuguese, French and Southeast Asian style. These streets used to be divided into areas for selling Chinese and western medicine, a street for silk and tailor made clothes, one for the fresh fish and meat, another for incense, candles, paper, ink, etc.

<u>The World’s Largest Human Migration </u>

The figures are mind boggling & here are just a few.

China's transport system is being put to the test as the world's largest annual human migration comes to a peak with the Spring Festival holiday wrapping up.

- More than 6.5 million trips were made on Chinese railways on Thursday, with more passengers expected to flood railway stations on Friday, which will witness the first rush of people returning to work after the seven day Spring Festival holiday.

- A total of 4,550 train services were operating on Wednesday, completing nearly 5.8 million trips for passengers,

- On Wednesday, nearly 50 million trips were made in private cars and buses and about 987,800 passengers traveled through 7,291 flights on the day.

Beers N Noodles toya…..shane ___________________________________________________________

The soundtrack to this entry was by Neil Young The album was &#8216;Harvest & Harvest Moon’ ____________________________________________________________

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui


Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Five Officials Temple &#38;amp; Tomb of Hai Rui

Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)