A Travellerspoint blog

February 2011

The 2011 Winter Beers N Noodles Adventure Ends

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya,

Do you want to know what I reckon? I reckon the New & Old Shaowu Crew is a double handful of fun!

I left Xiapu Sunday and took a three hour bus journey to Fuzhou as Yan was in town visiting some of the old Crew that were living in Shaowu the last time I taught there. I was only going to stay one night and then move on to Putian Monday but we had such a wonderful time Sunday night that we decided to get together again the following night.

Needless to say we had such a wonderful time we gathered again the nights following. So do you want to know what I reckon?

I reckon that the last many nights have been right up there with some of the most awesome nights I’ve had since arriving in China. After arriving in Fuzhou from Xiapu life has become very much like that in Salems Lot (Yangshuo) as I sleep the cold and rainy day light hours away and then meet up with the Shaowu Crew around five. We then head to the nights chosen destination for our Beers & Seafood Adventure and then move onto a live and vibrant bar and live happily ever after.

As each morning brings the same windy, wet and cold weather I am once again in Fuzhou City many festive nights later and will hopefully catch the one thirty bus back to Shaowu tomorrow. The weather man promises the same for the near future so I’ve decided to put off my visit to Putian as I’ve always dreamed of visiting Putian city and Meizhou Island with a beautiful blue sky above me with the sun also in town.

That is just not going to happen any time prior to Monday.

As Yan headed back to Shaowu yesterday I am sure there will be a big dinner organised prior to us both beginning next terms classes on Monday. The 2011 Winter 'Beers & Noodles Adventure’ will come to an end as my bus arrives in my lovely little Min Jiang (the Min River) town and without question as tomorrow is what is known as The Lantern Festival it will be pointless even bothering to try to listen to music as the skies will be filled with colourful flashes and the sonic booms from the endless fireworks will leave the air thick with the sour taste and smell of gun powder.

I also reckon that I need to make an appointment with my washing machine.

Do you know what I also reckon?

As I sit in the Fuzhou bus stations Mc Donald’s restaurant; I reckon that little girl over there has super squinty Chinese eyes.

Like at the end of the 2007 Summer 'Beers N Noodles’ Adventure when I sat in this same seat writing my last blog for that adventure, there is a birthday party going on here in Mc Donald's and her cardboard hat is squashing her eyes together making them Super Chinese and I reckon that's really super cute!

I reckon the above reminds me of when I am in class and when one of the MANY students who needs glasses puts their fingers at the end of their eyes and lifts the skin,

I reckon this makes them look Super Chinese just like the little girl over there. I reckon if we did that anywhere in Australia we would be taken to court.

I also continue to believe that Mc Donald’s can't cook a chicken wrap and I still reckon even if they hired KFC workers something would go wrong and it would still taste like cardboard so I reckon I might as well be eating the Super Chinese Eyes girl’s party hat.

I reckon it's really cool that the McDonald’s staff gets to wear low cut jeans. I reckon that's really great for both them and me!

I reckon the Mc Donald's girl was a little silly giving me three sugars and three milks as I didn’t want the milk and reckon that if I wanted three sugars I would have asked for thre sugars as normally I would give the milk back and ask for a second sugar.

I reckon it's really cool that all foreigners look the same to Chinese people, so much so that someone has once again confused me for 007 or Austin Powers and is sending me secret messages on my hotel phone. Every few minutes it rings a different amount of times and then stops so I reckon that makes me an International Man of Mystery!

I reckon it's crazy that just like in 2007 in my room in the same hotel has a bath but the plug hole has a steel rod coming out of it so no one can put a plug in it so I reckon that being in China, if anyone does step on the steel rod they can't sue for compensation.

I reckon that's crazy!

I reckon the girl over there with the laptop just wants to look cool because as she sits there, she just looks around and shakes her hair every now and then. I reckon she does look kind of cool though as her lap top is a Sony so I reckon she's got money!

I reckon it feels like I'm sitting in Mc Donald’s in Melbourne. There are just as many Chinese people in it.

I reckon if the girl with the lap top shakes her hair one more time dandruff will fill the keyboard and it won't work anymore. I reckon that's the reason she hasn't typed anything for the entire time I've been here so I reckon the keyboard is already full of dandruff!

I reckon you want to know what I really really REALLY reckon! I reckon that's it mate, the 2011 ‘Winter Beers N Noodles Adventure’ is at its end.

I reckon I had a great time and visited some awesome places full of so much beauty and history. I reckon I met several beautiful girls and great people all whom helped me a lot and with whom I shared some great moments. I reckon most importantly, I drank some tasty beers and ate some delicious seafood and noodles!

I reckon more importantly than 'most importantly'; Is the fact that I survived all my bus rides! I reckon 'Life Huh!' 'Go Figure!'

<u>Now for a bit on The Lantern Festival</u>

Falling on the 15th day of the first month of the Lunar Year, the Lantern Festival takes place under a full moon, and marks the end of Chinese New Year festivities. The Lantern Festival dates back to shrouded legends of the Han Dynasty over two thousand years ago.

Legend of the Lantern Festival's Origin

In one such legend, the Jade Emperor in Heaven was so angered at a town for killing his favorite goose that he decided to destroy it with a storm of fire. However, a good-hearted fairy heard of this act of vengeance, and warned the people of the town to light lanterns throughout the town on the appointed day. The townsfolk did as they were told, and from the Heavens, it looked as if the village was ablaze. Satisfied that his goose had already been avenged, the Jade Emperor decided not to destroy the town. From that day on, people celebrated the anniversary of their deliverance by carried lanterns of different shapes and colors through the streets on the first full moon of the year, providing a spectacular backdrop for lion dances, dragon dances, and fireworks.

The Modern Lantern Festival

While the Lantern Festival has changed very little over the last two millennia, technological advances have made the celebration moreand more complex and visually stimulating. Indeed, the festival as celebrated in some places (such as Taipei, Taiwan) can put even the most garish American Christmas decorations to shame. They often sport unique displays of light that leave the viewer in awe.

Master craftsman will construct multicolored paper lanterns in the likeness of butterflies, dragons, birds, dragonflies, and many other animals; these accentuate the more common, red, spherical lanterns. Brilliantly-lit floats and mechanically driven light displays draw the attention of the young and old alike. Sometimes, entire streets are blocked off, with lanterns mounted above and to the sides, creating a hallway of lamps. Some cities in North China even make lanterns from blocks of ice! And just as in days gone by, the billion-watt background sets the scene for dragon and lion dances, parades, and other festivities.

Yuan Xiao and Tang Yuan

Yuan Xiao and Tang Yuan are balls of glutinous rice, sometimes rolled around a filling of sesame, peanuts, vegetable, or meat. Tang Yuan are often cooked in red-bean or other kinds of soup.

Beers N Noodles toya…..shane ___________________________________________________________

The soundtrack to this entry was by Lindsay Buckland. The album was &#8216;Eclipse of Common Sense’ ____________________________________________________________

A Valentines End to My Winter Break

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Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)

The Da Jing Ancient Village Adventure

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya,

Another ancient walled village was my plan for the day. Not a bad plan when you think of it.

As Simon works until three each morning helping his parents serve drunken late nighters at their restaurant we didn’t meet until half past ten, so I happily got another sleep in. But if you add the fact that many of his drunken customers then head back to my cheap hotel in a steady stream until three leaving me blogging between the hours of one to three then I guess it really wasn’t a sleep in after all.

After a relaxing catch up and breakfast coffee at the chicken shop, Fin, Simon and I then headed to yet another of Xiapu’s small bus stations and for the next hour and a half we were being thrown around on what has to be one of China’s worst 'main carriage ways’ which I was told hasn’t had a single moments repair in the past twelve years whilst the inner city road the government buildings can be found on is repaired each year.

Believe me it felt like it hadn’t been repaired for over fifty years and as there is barely any actual road left to drive on it has become one of those &#8216;things’ between the locals and the local government and with the amount of traffic is sees each day I can understand why.

After arriving at the villages west gate we began to take photos and seconds after Simons super cute sister came racing over. She had caught an earlier bus to Da Jing to visit some friends and just like the rest of us was so surprised that we were not only in the same village an hour and a half away but at the same gate at the same time. As I watched her jumping around in excitement at seeing us and I gave her the English name Joey as she looked like an extremely happy small Kangaroo. As she had been to the village many times she said good bye to her friends and became our guide to the area for the rest of the day.

Da Jing Ancient Village is a small unknown village found well off the tourist trail on the north eastern coast of Fujian Province an hour and a half from Xiapu City.

Once a mighty castle surrounded by several meter high walls, it was built during the Ming Dynasty (AD1368-1644) as a military station to help fight Japanese pirates. Now it remains partially surrounded by its Ming Dynasty walls and sadly over time the castle was slowly dissembled and its stones used to restore and build new homes within the village. Joey slowly showed us around explaining the history of different homes and other parts of the village along with its fishing culture. It was a very peaceful place and the locals warmly welcomed us yet wondered why I found their village interesting.

There were no yellow peaked hats and not a single flag. A BONUS on a beautiful sunny day in an Ancient Village!

Most of the population seemed to be as old as the village itself and everyone we spoke to had never seen a foreigner before. Like in most villages, water wells were found throughout which for me is always a bonus as it allows me to see a part of how life once was yet remains even so in 2011. I’ve never been part of a society that draws its water from beneath so a simple well may not be that exciting to most people but for me it always conjures up thoughts of ancient times and far off places which when I think about it, I guess is my exact reality.

It is also much cleaner than many of the rivers and creeks I have witnessed villagers washing both clothes and food in over the past six years.

After an hour or so of slowly meandering around Joey then took us to what was once known as the Gate of Death (the east gate remains). Outside of the main gate a second gate was built with a chamber in between. During times of war the outer gate was left partially guarded and easy to break into and once the attackers entered the chamber the gate was closed and locked from the outside leaving those within trapped.

They were then easy prey for the local military. Many arrows and large stones later they were no longer a threat.

Throughout our visit Joey had promised to take us to a beautiful sandy beach but after arriving it was so much more. With breath taking views of Bi Jia Shan Island as a back drop it was one of the most picture perfect postcard moments I’ve had since visiting Sakarijima Island in southern Japan eleven years ago. Back then I was travelling with a Swedish girl named Anna and after getting off the train in Kagoshima city we were getting some information from a tourist booth and after turning around I was left speechless.

Across Kagoshima bay was a huge smoking volcano. Being my first volcano it was more than an unexpected surprise!

After visiting a small pebble beach and village we began our journey back to Da Jing Village and realised that the last bus back to Xiapu had actually left three hours prior and I was once again given a perfect reality to the term &#8216;time flies when you are having fun’. We then grabbed a three wheeler mototaxi and took a very chilly one hour ride back to Chang Chun Zhen town where we sat for yet another amazingly delicious fresh seafood dinner before grabbing a taxi the rest of the way back to Xiapu city.

Now as Simons drunken eaters slowly return to my cheap hotel I am once again not given any chance of sleep and am tiredly blogging my way through until three when the city will shut its doors and I can finally shut my eyes in preparation for what the following day light hours may bring. After looking outside and seeing rain I am thinking that my time here in Xiapu city is at its end and after looking at the following weeks weather I am also left with the realisation that &#8216;maybe’ the 2011 &#8216;Winter Beers N Noodles’ daylight activities maybe at an end.

Thankfully though Yan is now in Fuzhou city visiting some of the old Shaowu Crew that were living there during my 2007 to June 2008 teaching stint. As it is now half past two in the morning, &#8216;tonight’ several other of the current Shaowu Crew will arrive by train and a big catch up dinner and bar night has already been arranged.

So I guess back to Fuzhou city it will be! Beers N Noodles toya…..shane

PS: also a big apology to Richie Ramone who spent many hours preparing new music for me to travel and blog by. Prior to leaving Shaowu I threw them onto my new memory stick to then copy onto my tiny travel computer and when it came time to do so, I found the memory stick no longer worked. So I've had to blog by the same music I've been travelling with for many years prior, but hey Tomohawk and Mike Patton mate!

The new memory sticks in the bag and the bags in the river! ___________________________________________________________

The soundtrack to this entry was by Tomohawk The album was &#8216;Self Titled’ ____________________________________________________________

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Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)

Japanese Chi'an Kong Hai Temple Adventure

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya,

What was once important as an ancient port; Is now important as a pilgrimage destination for Shingon believers.

Situated just five kilometers from downtown Xiapu city Chi’an village has had its fair share of time in history’s limelight. Once many notable Confucians such as Zhu Xi walked its winding streets and alleyways and during periods of war a fortified castle was built to protect the area’s residents, animals and monuments.

As a Japanese painting attracts the gaze of those walking by; So does Chi’an Village as it has now become somewhat of a Japanese Holy Land.

During the Tang Dynasty, whilst on an adventure seeking Buddhist doctrines, Kukai (Kobo-Daishi) the founder of Japanese Esoteric Buddhism, was rescued by here by Xiapu people after being shipwrecked in 804 AD. At the time the northern city of Chang’an (present day Xian City) was one of the world’s most famous cities that attracted both scholars and traders alike by the tens of thousands so after his stay in the small town of Chi’an he then ventured to the north of China and went on to study in Xian for several years before returning to Japan to found yet another Buddhist sect, the Shingon Sect.

Whilst trying to find some information on the temple I came across the following statement made by the writers of www.amoymagic.com and after temple travelling for a good stint of the past ten years through many Asian countries I couldn’t agree more, even though I am one of 'those’ who does the spending.

In fact, his secret was great rapport with the common people, who trusted and loved the man who had abandoned his well off lifestyle to become an ascetic monk. It’s ironic that nowadays so much is spent on his behalf.

After walking by and noticing a very clean yet small eatery when I first arrived in Xiapu a few nights ago I decided to drop in and see how the food was and while eating I got to talking to the son of the couple of own the restaurant. Simon, who is home from Gansu Province visiting his parents for Spring Festival sat with me and answered some of the questions I had about the Xiapu area. Being a local he wasn’t interested in the mudflats but as he only knew the story behind the Japanese Temple and had never actually visited it we decided to go together.

Today I also got to meet Fin who’s English is not only fantastic but she is also a wealth of information on the Xiapu area, religion and American movies (most of which I’ve never seen nor heard of).

We spent the day visiting both the Japanese Temple and a Chinese Temple known as the Temple of Kindness that is supposedly the oldest Buddhist Temple in Fujian Province. Comparing the two is just as hard as comparing the two countries of orientation and after having visited both countries I found that their temples are actually a good way to try and explain differences. The Japanese Temple was quiet, clean and had everything exactly, in its place including the dust. The Chinese Temple was of course full of people racing around and all within its walls, though in place, was also just a little noisily out of place.

Just the way I like it to be!

<u>Now a Bit on Shingon</u>

Shingon Buddhism is one of the mainstream major schools of Japanese Buddhism and one of the few surviving Esoteric Buddhist lineages that started in the third to fourth century C.E that originally spread to China and Korea. The esoteric teachings would later flourish in Japan under the auspices of a Buddhist monk named K&#363;kai, who traveled to Tang Dynasty China to acquire and request transmission of the esoteric teachings. For that reason, it is often called "Japanese Esoteric Buddhism", or "Orthodox Esoteric Buddhism".

The word Shingon is the Japanese reading of the Kanji for the Chinese word Zh&#275;ny&aacute;n, literally meaning; &#8216;True Words’, which in turn is the Chinese translation of the Sanskrit word Mantra.

The Shingon lineage is an ancient transmission of esoteric Buddhist doctrine that began in India and then spread to China and Japan. Shingon is the name of this lineage in Japan, but there are also esoteric schools in China, Korea, Taiwan and Hong Kong that consider themselves part of this lineage (as the originators of the Esoteric teachings) and universally recognize K&#363;kai as their eighth patriarch.

This is why sometimes the term "Orthodox Esoteric Buddhism" is used instead.

Shingon or Orthodox Esoteric Buddhism maintains that the expounder of the doctrine was originally the Universal Buddha Mahavairocana but the first human to receive the doctrine was Nagarjuna in India. The tradition recognizes two groups of eight great patriarchs - one group of lineage holders and one group of great expounders of the doctrine.

There is no Supreme Being or God in Buddhist Doctrine.

Mahavairocana as the central primordial Buddha in Esoteric Buddhist doctrine is not an actual &#8216;entity’ or a God but the true nature of all things and phenomena, the totality of reality in all form and formlessness, arising and non-arising. Though supernatural beings like Devas may be more powerful and live longer than humans, they are nevertheless afflicted by suffering and death.

Beers N Noodles toya…..shane ___________________________________________________________

The soundtrack to this entry was by Tracy Chapman The album was &#8216;New Beginning’ ____________________________________________________________

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Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)

The Yantian Floating Village Motorbike Adventure

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya,

Rainy mornings hey. What is one to do but sleep the rain drops away.

I woke around eleven and headed to Xiapu’s local bus station which is found at the other end of town and after a short yet picturesque half an hour’s bus journey that wound its way up and then un-wound its way down to the small bustling town of Yantian where after a short walk through some back alleyways I negotiated an afternoon on the back of a motorbike taxi. Once we had agreed on a price we were both happy with my guide and I sped off into the surrounding countryside towards the areas floating village.

Unlike their familiars found in Sandu’ao area these guys don’t have their own postal system. Nor do they have a police station, restaurants, convenient stores or emergency numbers. What they do have is extreme poverty, bitter coldness and a lot of endless hard work.

There are around fifteen thousand Fishing Families from both the Yantian and Dong’an areas that have been living on their fishing boats for generations. During the Tang Dynasty, when Fishing Families in east Fujian (Fuzhou and Ningde) chose to settle on their fishing boats rather than live with the chaos caused by the constant wars that were happening throughout China during that period.

Later they became known as the 'Gypsies of the Sea’. The families survived by collecting marine products from the sea.

Prior to China’s liberation, it was illegal for them to ever set foot on land and marry mainlanders so wedding and funeral ceremonies were held on one of the boats in the floating village. Now days and with the help of the local governments, the families can build some sort of housing on the shore nearby their place of watery employment.

However though, many families have chosen to stay and continue living their Sea Faring Lifestyle. When we arrived at the floating village my guide and I were welcomed with open arms.

Many dropped their tools to show us around the village and then offered us hot tea to help warm our bones. They all happily chatted away in the local Mindong Dialect and my guide who couldn’t speak a work of Mandarin (Chinese as we know it) tried to pass on what was being said but nothing worked until I gave them my phrase book and as all Chinese know the same characters (Minorities all speak them differently) we began to get somewhere.

They told me that my visit warmed their hearts and thanked me for my visit.

I on the other hand felt a bitter chill and total sadness that such warm hearted people could be forgotten and left to make do with their lifestyle and surroundings. I saw mud and poverty and felt the freezing temperatures they had to live with each and every day of their lives and felt so horrible at the fact that I knew that they would probably never be given the opportunity of change that I try so hard not to take for granted.

But sitting there freezing cold on a stood placed in mud I felt totally horrible.

After doing my best to explain how I felt they all laughed and told me that they were happy and that their hearts were full of warmth to be given the opportunity to be with their families each day. They told me that the &#8216;richer’ part of society spent most of their lives at their work place and only had the chance to be with their family for a short period each day.

I left feeling warmer, yet inside I still felt the bitter chill of my privileged existence!

Beers N Noodles toya…..shane ___________________________________________________________

The soundtrack to this entry was by Jasey Taylor The album was &#8216;Balance 002’ ____________________________________________________________

Yantian Floating Village Adventure

Yantian Floating Village Adventure


Yantian Floating Village Adventure

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Yantian Floating Village Adventure

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Yantian Floating Village Adventure

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Yantian Floating Village Adventure

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Yantian Floating Village Adventure

Yantian Floating Village Adventure


Yantian Floating Village Adventure

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Yantian Floating Village Adventure

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Yantian Floating Village Adventure

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Yantian Floating Village Adventure

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Yantian Floating Village Adventure

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Yantian Floating Village Adventure

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Yantian Floating Village Adventure

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Yantian Floating Village Adventure

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Yantian Floating Village Adventure

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Yantian Floating Village Adventure

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Yantian Floating Village Adventure

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Yantian Floating Village Adventure

Yantian Floating Village Adventure


Yantian Floating Village Adventure

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Yantian Floating Village Adventure

Yantian Floating Village Adventure


Yantian Floating Village Adventure

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Yantian Floating Village Adventure

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Yantian Floating Village Adventure

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Yantian Floating Village Adventure

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Yantian Floating Village Adventure

Yantian Floating Village Adventure


Yantian Floating Village Adventure

Yantian Floating Village Adventure

Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)

The Beiqi Village & Mudflats Ride

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya,

As tickets for all large buses had been sold out for the next many days at midday yesterday I began another wonderful, yet long bus ride and after an eight hour town and multi Chicken Bus hop I finally made it to Xiapu city.

Where in the world is Xiapu?

Enclosed by mountains and sea, with an over four thousand year old history Xiapu is known as the birthplace of Mindong’s (East Fujian) civilization. It is located in the central point of what is known as China’s golden coast, became a county during the Jin Dynasty and was the capital of East Fujian from the Tang Dynasty through to the Qing Dynasty.

Anyhow, enough of Xiapu and its history as that’s not the reason why I am here. For me it’s all about the areas mudflats and seafood.

This morning I rose early and happily accepted the use of a bike that was offered to me last night and once I put foot on peddle I headed in the direction I was told Beiqi Village could be found. Thankfully it was impossible to get lost as once I was on the right road I just had to continue and ask at each little village if it was Beiqi Village. As I was told the mudflats were past the village I slowly rode through sleepy Beiqi Village waking up a storm.

When the locals saw a foreigner waving happily riding by they’d race inside bringing out any child or children available be them awake or asleep.

Sadly once I found the mudflats I found that the tide had returned to this part (didn’t think of that did I) of the China but none the less, it really didn’t matter as it was overcast and threatening rain so I wasn’t expecting glimmers of sunshine and mudflats full of colour. Those that know me know that I’m not the type of traveller that goes somewhere for a sun rise or sun set. It’s actually the hours between 'the rise and set’ that allows me to hunt for temples and what is left of Ancient China.

What I did find was something just as stunning.

I continued riding along the bumpy road until it became a smallish track and had to leave the bike behind and scale across a section where there had been a small landslide. I continued on foot until I reached the tracks destruction from a much larger landslide and here I gave in and began my return journey. Back in the village and so ferociously hungery that I could have eaten the feet off a low flying duck, I dropped into a tiny eatery that from what I could gather serves only one thing and in one style.

But after my first taste I wondered why I hadn’t found it anywhere else. They were some of the best noodles I’ve ever tasted. So, what in the world are mudflats?

Coastal mudflats usually appear in sheltered bays along the intertidal areas where sediment is deposited by tides, so the area is usually submerged and exposed on a daily basis. In Xiapu County a long and narrow mudflat has been dubbed the most beautiful in China.

The Xiapu mudflat is primarily composed of sand and mud. The constant tidal washing creates a surface design akin to a tiger-skin pattern.

When the tide first begins to recede, lines in the mudflat gradually become visible through the seawater, and as time passes, the exposed area increases while the tiger-skin pattern becomes deeper and clearer. As its marine cover dissipates, the mudflat awakes to reveal a mysterious world from under the sea. At first, an isolated &#8216;island’ appears still surrounded by water, but gradually the island grows until it unites with the surrounding mudflat.

Xiapu’s most famous products are several varieties of seaweed and pickled mustard tuber.

The sea-farming area of Xiapu’s seaweed covers more than two thousand hectares and during harvest season hundreds of farmers work on the shore, creating an image like a traditional Chinese ink painting brought to life. A heavy seaweed scent is infused into the normally salty sea scent and harvested seaweed hangs from bamboo sticks. When gusts of wind pass through the seaweed begins dancing and when the sunshine pierces the seaweed’s dark-green skin, it causes sparkling golden rays that spectacularly light up the entire mudflat. Beiqi Village’s mudflat primarily grows laver which is a kind of seaweed.

Farmers employ a technique known as &#8216;pillaring’ whereby bamboo sticks measuring ten meters are embedded two meters deep in the soft mud and nets are hung between them. On the five square-meter surface area of each net, farmers spread leaf-shaped laver. Dozens of nets are tied to the bamboo &#8216;pillars’ and spread across the sea with spaces for boats to pass through. Sea-farmers cultivate and harvest their crops from the boats and when one views the tens of thousands of nets and pillars from afar;

Beiqi’s mudflat appears as a picturesque amalgamation of squares and dots. Beers N Noodles toya…..shane ___________________________________________________________

The soundtrack to this entry was by Blur The album was the awesome &#8216;13’ ____________________________________________________________

Beiqi Village &#38;amp; Mudflats (1)

Beiqi Village &#38;amp; Mudflats (1)


Beiqi Village &#38;amp; Mudflats (1)

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Beiqi Village &#38;amp; Mudflats

Beiqi Village &#38;amp; Mudflats

Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)