A Travellerspoint blog

January 2013

Oh My Gawd, I'm In Vodkese Bay!

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya,

Two Vodkese Pleeeze. Ok, I’m officially Weirded Out! Where the hell am I and when exactly did I change flights?

As if my journey across Russia onboard the Trans Siberian twelve years ago wasn’t strange enough, arriving at the Dadonghai Bay area of Sanya City (Hainan Island, Southern China) to find myself amongst thousands of Russians is kind of insanely just as strange.

Beer Blood Pistols N Vodka (Click here to read my crazy journey onboard the Trans Siberian in 2000)

Choose a restaurant, grab the menu…it’s in Chinese and Russian. Waitress comes across to take your order…she begins speaking Russian. Lost Russians who want to be found…you guessed it, they speak Russian. Everything from windows to signs to Chinese waitresses are all in Russian. Dude I may look like you but that doesn’t mean I understand a thing you are saying!

The last few days really have felt like winning a surprise holiday while already being on holiday and instead of me flying to a different destination I simply stayed put and my total environment was changed…kind of like staring in the Vodkese version of Total Recall.

<u>What has been happening since I left you in Nanchang?</u>

My flight was as smooth as Sanya Bay and after grabbing the shuttle bus into the city I found a hotel and spent the night eating fresh seafood BBQ and sharing beers with several locals sitting on the table next to me. Judy’s crazy 'multi-flight’ journey finally ended and for the first time in six and a half years we shared fresh seafood BBQ and beer. The following morning we boarded the Speedy Train to the south of Hainan Island to beautiful Sanya City where we were met by Owen Buckland, his lovely wife Jenifer;

Along with a &#8216;not so little anymore’ Jerry.

We spent the next few hours catching up over one of the finest dinners I’ve had in years and we were honored to meet Owens high school English Teacher, whom helped carve the love of the English language into Owens mind. Without her helping create Buckland’s (long before Owen even thought about it) I would have signed with another and I doubt I would have stayed in China eight years. Buckland’s is what it is, they are who they are but without Owen I’m unsure if it would have that totally friendly yet professional attitude about it as someone else would be running the show.

<u>Vodkese Bay & Beach (China’s Gold Coast)</u>

Dadonghai is actually much smaller than I anticipated yet thankfully for now its prices are around the same size I imagined, that though will change the closer to Spring Festival we get. We have only been here for several days yet as each day passes the Flamboyance of people seems to double but so far it remains relatively comfortable.

Owen put us up in a local family &#8216;apartment’ which is just off Haihua Road. Almost on the fluffy white sands of Dadonghai Beach.

The beach/bay is absolutely beautiful and in a single panoramic glance you take in clusters of people baking themselves, a skulk swimming in the crystal clear water, groups jet skiing, a bevy trying to swim, a shrewdness almost swimming, an Implausibility almost drowning along with a battery of diver newbie’s who seem to send more time with their heads out of the water than in so maybe they are a Screech of snorkeling newbie’s. A destruction (of people) can also be found walking along the beautiful boardwalk that takes you along the cliffs to the right of the bay along with gaggles relaxing with a beer and a meal at one of the many foreshore open air bars/restaurants where strangely;

The food prices are not that much higher than those off the beach strip. Which more than surprised me!

The walk around to the Oriental Resort is defiantly worth the time as just as you leave the town behind there is a rocky inlet where you’ll find flutters of brides and grooms having their happy snaps taken. After all Sanya is China’s &#8216;Wedding/Honeymoon’ capital and with perfect weather and blue skies almost all year round, I can see why.

When it comes to the &#8216;other’ thing (besides the beach and weather) we head south to Sanya for, there are more than enough bars and restaurants in town and all come with that relaxed beach atmosphere we expect to find in such a place. For those on a budget, firstly why the hell are you in Sanya during Spring Festival and secondly there is actually a bellowing of small local eateries that serve cheap dumplings and noodles. For the Intrusion chasing street snacks, sorry guys but you will need jump back on the train and speedily head back to Haikou to get your fill.

As for all of the above, some actually do have an English menu. Which is a nice added touch for us non-Russians?

Speaking of the Chattering of non-Russians, they all seem to eat and hang out at The Dolphin bar whose menu leaves one salivating even after eating and no matter how hard I tried I could never remember the name of the bar. When deciding where to head for a cold beer or a salad etc I’d spurt out &#8216;how about the Penguin/Seagull/Snow Bear/Whale’ every watery creature under the sun but the damn dolphin!

Beers N Noodles toya…..shane PS: Why the photo of the Barry Hotel? My Dads a Bazza...love and miss ya mate! ___________________________________________________________

The soundtrack to this entry was by Amorphis The album was &#8216;Magic and Mayhem' ____________________________________________________________

Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure


Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

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Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

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Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

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Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

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Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

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Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

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Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

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Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure


Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure


Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure


Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure


Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure


Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure


Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure


Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure


Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure


Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure


Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

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Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

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Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

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Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

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Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

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Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure


Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure


Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure


Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure


Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

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Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure


Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure


Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure


Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

Hainan Island Dadonghai Adventure

Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)

Beers N Noodles On Tropical Hainan Island

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya,

The 2013 'Tropical Hainan Island’ Beers N Noodles Adventure has begun!

For those who have completely no idea where I am, I was going to put together my own &#8216;history thing’ on Hainan Island that was until I came across the information below. It was obviously written by a Chinese graduate so believe it or not, I had to actually tone down the &#8216;English’ quite a lot as it read like a Penguin Classic.

<u>Some Guys Historical Overview</u>

History can’t make up its mind about the Hainan Island.

Sitting off the southern coast of China and to the east of Vietnam, it has been both eulogized as the Hawaii of the East and condemned as the Gates of Hell. Perhaps the truth lies somewhere in between. Originally considered by the Chinese to be the place where the civilized world officially ended and fit only to send convicts, the Hainan of today is conversely overrun with Chinese tourist and espoused by many as China’s idyllic island paradise.

Human activities on Hainan Island can be traced back between six to ten thousand years.

Written history, however only begins after 200 BC when Hainan Island fell under Chinese Control during the Qin Dynasty. Subsequent dynasties like the Tang, Song and Yuan (6th-14th centuries) set up special administrative offices on Hainan Island and began incorporating it into the country’s central government. Han Chinese moved in and the indigenous tribes retreated further inland.

According to ancient records, Hainan Island was nicknamed the Tail of the Dragon, the last unexplored frontier of China and civilization. Because of its remote and forbidding location, many renegades were exiled to its sandy shores, including the famous Poet Su Dongpo, who was banished there during the Song Dynasty.

In more recent times, Hainan Island was used as a strategic military outpost in 1890 to combat the French in the Qing Dynasty. Similarly, the Hainan people later helped the Communists to battle the Japanese in the 1930-1945. In 1950, the PRC officially established the Hainan Special Administrative Area. Finally in 1988, Hainan Island officially became a province, the youngest and smallest province of China in Land and the biggest in ocean area with Haikou established as the capital. At the same time, Hainan Island became a special economic zone. Free market economies quickly took root and Hong Kong investment began pouring in. Since then, the local government and people have both caught the tourism bug, seeing the tourism industry as the easiest way to make a quick buck and advance the economy. Their motto is to promote the ten major tourist resources: blue sea, bright sunshine, sandy beaches, hot springs, tropical climate, tropical rainforest, grottos, minority culture, clean air and beautiful scenery. <u> </u>

Hainan’s inarguably most attractive feature is its sandy beaches and bays which are the ideal venues for all manner of water sports, from windsurfing to scuba diving to kayaking.

Sanya city was a favorite haunt of the former Chinese leader, Mao Zedong, himself an avid swimmer. It was also very popular with the Russian elite during the Soviet era, which earned the city the title of the "Vladivostok of the East". Sanya is now increasingly popular with tourists from Japan and Korea. In fact, to this day, one meets a myriad of signs round about the city that are written in Russian, and some of the service personnel also still speak the lingo, and for these reasons perhaps, plus Hainan's proximity to Russia's Pacific coast, many Russians still frequent Sanya.

<u>Hainan Language (LP)</u>

Hainanese is a broad term for the bakers dozen local dialects of Hainan Min, most of which are also spoken in Guangdong. There is also a large population of Hakka speakers. While some Li and Miao can speak Mandarin, they prefer to use their own languages.

Beers N Noodles toya…..shane The photos for this blog were taken from &#8216;construction walls’. ___________________________________________________________

The soundtrack to this entry was by DORO The album was &#8216;Love Me In Black’ ____________________________________________________________

Sanyas Construction Walls

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Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)

Far Too Much Street Food In Nanchang

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya,

The '2013 Winter Beers N Noodles Adventure has now begun and my first port of call is Jiangxi Province’s capital, Nanchang city.

I first visited Nanchang during the 2009 Summer Beers N Noodles Adventure but after being hassled by far too many &#8216;hotel people’ boarded the next bus and scampered to Luotiancun, Shuinan & Jingtai Villages where I spent a very peaceful few days meandering around several ancient villages. For some reason at no time over the past year and a half I have been living in Jiangxi Province have I wanted to return to &#8216;that bus station’ but as the Nanchang airport is the closest airport to Dexing Town, I had no choice. From the moment I left my apartment everything went so smooth, I headed downstairs and said hello to my headmaster and as he was heading in the bus station direction he gave me a lift, upon arriving there was a bus slowly making its way down the drive way and within seconds I was onboard;

With Suzi Quatro yelling sweet nothings in my ear.

When I arrived in Nanchang I checked out a few hotels in the bus station area and decided to stretch my legs and grab one halfway into the city and after passing a rather &#8216;nice’ looking Business Hotel I decided to check out how much it was and for some reason after a small chat, the girls behind the counter felt sorry for me having to live and teach in such a small town and gave me a rather comfortable discount.

So this time, did Nanchang win me over? You bet your wok fried chicken feet it did!

I spent last evening walking around Zhongshan pedestrian street snacking on far too many snacks found in the labyrinth of small alleyways found in the area and today I visited the cities draw card, the beautiful Tengwang Pavilion along with the peaceful Shengjin Pagoda and when done on foot both make a wonderful days adventure. As evening approached I made the mistake of returning to the Zhongshan Pedestrian Street area and once again refilled on far too many street snacks and after walking back to my hotel I now sit here with a couple of cold beers writing but sadly find that I am actually too full to get half way through the first.

Tomorrow I will board my second flight in eight years. First was to Shanghai in 2007 and the last was to Shaowu in September 2010. Not bad for someone who has travelled China four months a year for eight years.

<u>Now For a Bit On Nanchang & My Two Sites</u>

Nanchang is the capital of Jiangxi Province in southeastern China which is located in the north-central portion of the province. As it is bounded on the west by the Jiuling Mountains, and on the east by Poyang Lake and due to its central location relative to the Yangtze and Pearl River Delta regions, it is one of the major rail hubs in southern China&#12290;

It has a historical and cultural history of more than two thousand years.

<u>The Shengjin Pagoda</u>

The Shengjin Pagoda was first built during the reign of Tianyou during the Tang Dynasty (A.D. 904-907). It is said that an iron box was dug up while the tower was being built and found inside were four bundles of gold ropes, three ancient swords and three hundred Buddhist Relics. It is almost sixty meters high with a foundation of almost thirty four meters. It is a seven tiered tower with eight sides and has carved eaves and verandas on each floor and at its peak sits a gold-plated tripod.

<u>The Tengwang Pavilion</u>

The Pavilion was built in the year 653 by Prince Teng, the son of the first emperor of the Tang Dynasty (618-907). It was rebuilt during the reign of the Ming Emperor Jingtai (1450-1456) and during the Qing Dynasty it was destroyed and reconstructed. In 1926 a fire set by the Northern Warlords (1912-1927) once again burnt it to the ground. Reconstruction of the pavilion began in 1983 was completed in 1989 and symbolises the now non-existent ancient city wall. A stainless steel tablet at the entrance is engraved with a calligraphy work of Mao Zedong.

Beers N Noodles toya…..shane ___________________________________________________________

The soundtrack to this entry was by Suzi Quatro. The album was &#8216;The Best Of’ ____________________________________________________________

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

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Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

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Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

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Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

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Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda


Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp;  Shengjin Pagoda

Tengwang Pavilion &#38;amp; Shengjin Pagoda

Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)

Jishui Reflective River Walk & Xinjiang Cuisine

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya,

You are hungry, AGAIN! Do you feel like Beef Noodles?

I’ll take you for another walk (the same walk as my last blog) into the city along the Jishui River but this time whilst we walk and talk we can 'reflect’ upon our lives and our first river walking adventure. In town there is an awesome selection to choose from but I usually eat on Small Eat Street which is a short street that runs from the main shopping street down to the river that offers a small yet diverse range of eateries. As usual I mostly choose to slurp my noodles at the Muslim/Xinjiang Eatery that has an entire wall full of rice and noodle dishes to choose from.

The Muslim Family that owns the restaurant is from a town in Gansu Province that is only one hour from where I lived and taught in Biayin City and depending on what time I finish my afternoon/evening ride/walk, if I arrive during their dinner time I am ushered into the family room and eat with them or if I arrive later the father sits with me and we &#8216;chip and chirp’ about our day.

When I enter a Xinjiang Eatery I am in total heaven. There is honestly an entire wall of different noodles to choose from.

<u>Before I Go On &#8216;Its Winter Break (Chinese New Year)’</u>

Winter break is knocking on my front door which means that it is Chinese New Year and in a day or five around seven hundred million people will be doing their best to get from Point A to B, most will arrive but many will not. Hundreds of trains and buses will be added to the already overloaded transport system and millions upon millions of people will sleep in the Train/Bus stations square waiting in hope that they join the line that gets them on board the train/bus that gets them back to their family.

Most will but many will have waited in vain. With so many new additions the transport system can only wait so long. Thousands will have waited in line for days to join a line that was simply too slow.

Normally I choose to join the masses and spend my Winter Break doing my best to get from here to there, waiting &#8216;patiently’ in line on this day to then join it again and wait &#8216;patiently’ the next day or that thereafter. This year I choose to actually take an actual holiday which means I have an actual paper plane ticket to Tropical Hainan Island where I will spend two glorious weeks not only with my boss Owen Buckland;

But my buddy Aussie Judy who is flying from Australia to spend two weeks drinking beer and eating fresh seafood and street BBQ with me.

For my &#8216;not so long term’ blog readers, Judy taught in Tiandong town (Guangxi Province) for a year when I was teaching in tiny Tianyang town (my first teaching post). We ended up travelling a lot of Guangxi Province, Yunnan Province and Sichuan Province together and since have always kept in touch. This will be the first time in six and a half years that we will actually sit at a street side BBQ and slurp our cold beers and noodles and in between feasting upon countless meat and fresh seafood sticks.

My bags are packed! I’m off to Nanchang city tomorrow where I will find my first new adventure for the &#8216;2013 Winter Beers N Noodles Adventure’. Bring it on!

<u>Now For ABit On Xinjiang Cuisine</u>

Xinjiang cuisine barely holds any thread of &#8216;Chineseness’ as it has a most definite Middle Eastern style in the cooking ingredients and presentation. The answer to the riddle of course is in history. The north western province of China was the significant gateway for Sino European and Sino-Arabic trade and as time went on some of the traders established themselves in permanent societies along the routes of trade. These people were obviously of middle-eastern culture and along with their business skills they brought their foods and recipes, wives and established their own families in these places.

The use of the vertical oven is noticeable everywhere!

Xinjiang cuisine reflects the cooking styles of many ethnic groups of the Xinjiang region, and refers particularly to Uyghur cuisine. Ingredients include roast mutton, kebab, roast fish and rice and because of the Islamic population, the food is predominantly halal. Traditionally, there is a distinction between northern and southern Chinese Islamic cuisine despite both utilising mutton and lamb. Northern Chinese Islamic cuisine relies heavily on beef, but rarely ducks, geese, shrimp or seafood, while southern Islamic cuisine is the reverse.

<u>The Greatest Noodle Soup In The World!</u>

Lamian (Lanzhou Beef Noodles) is made by stretching and folding the dough into strands.

However, the twisting and subsequent stretching of the strips of dough happens due to the weight of the dough. Depending on the number of times the dough gets folded, the strands can be made in various lengths and thicknesses. This unique method of making noodles originated back to 1504 and it is now popular all over China. This dish has five main features: clear soup, white radish, red pepper, green caraway and noodles. The noodles can be wide or slim to meet different preferences;

Supposedly men like them wider while girls like them slim, the middle aged and the old like leek leaf and maoxi (which is even slimmer), scholars prefer slim and farmers, soldiers and workers prefer wide or if possible even wider.

Whatever, a bowl of beef noodles takes only a few minutes to prepare. Beers N Noodles toya…..shane ___________________________________________________________

The soundtrack to this entry was by The Butterfly Effect The album was &#8216;Crave’ ____________________________________________________________

Jishui Reflective River Walk

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Jishui Reflective River Walk

Jishui Reflective River Walk


Jishui Reflective River Walk

Jishui Reflective River Walk


Jishui Reflective River Walk

Jishui Reflective River Walk


Jishui Reflective River Walk

Jishui Reflective River Walk


Jishui Reflective River Walk

Jishui Reflective River Walk


Jishui Reflective River Walk

Jishui Reflective River Walk


Jishui Reflective River Walk

Jishui Reflective River Walk


Jishui Reflective River Walk

Jishui Reflective River Walk


Jishui Reflective River Walk

Jishui Reflective River Walk

Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)

Jishui River Walk & Jiangxi Cuisine

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya,

Are you hungry? Cool me too, let me make a call.

My friends are busy for the next few hours but they are up for a big dinner of local Jiangxi Cuisine so until then why don’t we take a walk along the Jishui River and on the way we’ll drop into a temple that usually has weekend dances and performances. I do this walk several times a week and it takes me from my school in the very east of town all the way to the far end of town at what I call the West Bridge area, mainly because that’s where the west and last bridge out of town is.

We can then slowly walk back into town and met them at one of our friend’s restaurants. I’ve eaten there several times and the food is delicious!

<u>Jiangxi (Gan) Cuisine</u>

Jiangxi Cuisine, known locally as 'Gan Cuisine’ is derived from the native cooking styles from within the province.

It has a long history (dating back to the Qin and Han dynasty) and inherits the dishes of past centuries which have developed into the unique native dishes that I get to enjoy during my stay here in Jiangxi. There are also various kinds of local snacks and pastries that are made by using different cooking methods. Based on the Nanchang and Ganzhou schools, Jiangxi food is characterised by its local ingredients and special culinary arts including broiling, steaming, stir-frying, stewing, braising and rice-power steaming.

The food is widely acceptable in China as it is tasty, a little oily, not too rich or too salty yet mostly hot and spicy.

Like the cuisines of neighboring provinces, Jiangxi cuisine favours overtly spicy flavours and like many regions surrounding it, chili peppers are directly used as vegetable instead of as flavouring as they are in most other Chinese regional cuisines. One of the main characteristics of the cuisine is that there are rarely cold dishes, nor is anything served raw in contrast to other Chinese cuisines. This is due to that it uses tea oil as its primary cooking oil and if raw tea oil is consumed uncooked, it causes severe stomach problems for most people.

Due to its geography, fish banquets are also one of the characteristics of Jiangxi cuisine and in contrast to Heilongjiang cuisine (in the very north of China, found just beneath Russia) which is famed for fresh Sea Food banquets, Jiangxi cuisine is famed for freshwater fish banquets. It is also famous for its heavy emphasis on the utilisation of douchi (fermented black beans) and tofu, in comparison to other Chinese cuisines.

Jiangsu Cuisine is also famous for its beautiful appearance. There is also a detailed sequence with which to serve the dishes. All the dishes should not only taste marvellous but also look attractive.

Jiangxi dishes focus mainly on the cooking processes and in terms of cutting skills, there are eighteen varieties and three categories. Seasoning and cooking time are also of vital importance while trays of irregular shape are utilised to emphasise the theme so as to stimulate the guests’ appetite.

Beers N Noodles toya…..shane ___________________________________________________________

The soundtrack to this entry was by Magic Dirt The album was &#8216;Life Was Better’ ____________________________________________________________

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine


Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Jishui River Walk &#38;amp; Cuisine

Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China Comments (0)