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Whirly Windy Things That Spin & Back On Baiyunshan

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya, Whirly windy things that spin. They come in an enormous amount of colours and designs. They flash, they spin and they mesmorise both Chinese adults and children. For the last few days every where I walk I see people of all ages walking with only one arm at their side. The other is before them with a whirly windy thing that spins in the wind. I am serious, it doesn't matter who they are, what age they are or even where they are they all walk around with these things in their hand. They all walk around with that same big happy expression you see on a child's face when they get one of these things at a fair. Shopping centers, metro stations, noodle bars, parks, gardens, mountain trails it doesn't matter. They giggle, they laugh, they do both while looking at their own or each others. It honestly is so innocent that it is beautiful. I woke wondering what in the world I should do for such an important event as today was, that being Chinese New Years Eve. Usually I am with friends and as they are Chinese that makes their New Year very much pre-planned by traditional and family. Therefore we don't have to worry about what to do or where to go. This year I found myself very far away from all my friends both Chinese and Western. And sadly, even further away from Luo Wei. Who I would love to be with to celebrate our second Chinese New Year together! As usual I felt like spending the day walking but I'm almost out of places to go so I figured why not head back to the mountain as there is still so much of it I haven't seen. So I raced to Gongyuanqian metro station and grabbed Bus 24 to the bottom of the mountain and when I came across the following text on a large sign I was not only impressed, but happy to begin my New Years Eve day here. [/i] The city of Guangzhou was established over two thousand and twenty years ago. Baiyun Mountain has stood beside it as its loyal protector and has been historically hailed as the 'Dragon Vein' of the city. According to records, after the Emperor Yingzheng of the Qin Dynasty (BC221 to 207) reunified the south of China, a Feng Shui expert told him that the north of Guangzhou (which was then known as the city of Renxiao) between Baiyun Mountain and Yuexiu Mountain, there was an inauspicious yellow cloud and purple mist. [/i] [/i] Which in turn meant that the place was the dragon vein of the entire country.[/i] And in the future some extraordinary figure would be born. [/i] [/i] Fearful of this news, Emperor Yingzheng sent someone to the south of China to destroy the dragon vein by digging a huge hole with a diameter of several dozen Zhang (a measurement used in ancient China, 1 Zhang = 3.333 Meters) at the foot of Baiyun Mountain. According to the chronicle of Panyu County, after digging the hole the area looked like a giant saddle. Therefore the mountain became known as Saddle Mountain. Now few people know that the seemingly ordinary and undulating mountain south of Jingtai Cave and north of Hengzhi Ridge is 'the' Saddle Mountain that greatly frightened the first Chinese Emperor in history well over two thousand years ago. [/i] [/i] It was around mid day by the time I finally finished walking to the top of the mountain and as I hadn't visited the Mingchungu Natural Bird Cage I decided to head there first. The bird cage cost 10 Yuan to enter and the ticket price also includes the Dishuiyan Butterfly Valley. The Mingchungu Bird Cage is the largest Natural Bird Cage in China and was built in 1989. Inside you walk amongst over five thousand birds of over one hundred and fifty varieties. As it was New Year most people were at home eating a traditional lunch with their family so I had the entire bird cage and valley to myself. The birdcage was beautiful (by Chinese standards) and though it sounds bigger than what it is I still spent about an hour or so walking from here to there and playing silly buggers with all the birds such as the cockies that say Ni Hao. I know I live in China but a cocky should say 'Hello Cocky, wah wah' and not Ni Hao wah wah! It really was the strangest thing when I first heard it. I then spent an hour walking around the Dishiuyan Valley which really was extremely beautiful. I was hoping the pathway would take me to the bottom of the mountain as I was then going to walk around the other half of the lake but instead it wound its way back to the top again. It would probably be better to visit the valley during summer as then the waterfall would be much more than just a trickle. I then headed across Shanding Square and began walking down the stairs that would take me to Nengren Temple and then the bottom. Somehow though I got distracted by a sign that read 'to the ????? Temple ruins' and for the next three hours I was happily walking every which way but down. I ended up way over on another mountain were EVERYTHING was Dragon This and Dragon that! Its like this everywhere in China, dragons dragons dragons, but you never actually see any damn dragons! By now it was dark and I must give a big thanks to the person who was smart enough to say, hey let's put lights along all of the mountain tracks. Baiyun Mountain is just as beautiful at night and very safe as you will find families walking together all over the mountain after dark or so I am told. I can vouch for the part I was on as I must have past over ten families on the hill and on my way down. I ended up on the same road as I ended on last week so I caught Bus Number 127 and figured as I still had over four hours until mid night I would take it to the end of it's route. I ended up at the Zoo Bus Station and from there walked all the way to 27 Martyrs Cemetery Metro. There wasn't much to see but I had some wonderful Muslim Noodles on the way. From there I caught the metro across town to Huangsha Metro Station and soon I was happily walking once again in peace and quiet amongst the European buildings on Shamian Island. Once I left Shamian I expected to find the streets in a complete frenzy of New Years party goers. Instead I found a small trickle of people and I thought to myself, this is Guangzhou, a city with a population of nearly three and a half million people and very international and all that stuff.. Where the hell is everyone on such an important night? Surely they all can't be all still home eating. After walking along the Pearl River for about twenty minutes I noticed that on the other side there seemed to be a constant stream of people walking so when I reached Jiefang Zhonglu I decided to head across the bridge and see if there was a party across there. I didn't find what I was after which was a 'Chinese Festival' with a dragon, traditional performances etc but what I did find was a road closed off to motorists and thousands upon thousands of people walking in both directions. In the middle were stalls selling flowers, things that blow up into the shape of an Ox, flashing Ox badges, Ox tee-shirts, Ox drinks, Ox snacks anything and everything Ox as it was soon to be the Year of the Ox. And of course I also found a million varities of whirly things that spin in the wind. Some of these also flashed and had Ox's on them also. What I didn't find, in fact for the entire day I didn't see anyone drinking alcohol, arguing, fighting and nor did I find any litter on the ground. I then realised that I hadn't seen any of these things since arriving in Guangzhou and now realised that despite what is written about this city, it is in fact one of the cleanest Chinese cities I have been to and it was a pleasure to see the new year in here. The people of Guangzhou are very proud people and they are very proud of their city. After being here and travelling far and wide seeing some....not so clean places, I am proud of them too. Beers N Noodles toya.....shane ________________________________________________ The soundtrack to this entry was by the wonderful Mr Bungle The album was 'California' ________________________________________________

Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox

Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox


Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox

Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox


Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox

Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox


Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox

Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox


Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox

Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox


Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox

Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox


Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox

Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox


Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox

Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox


Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox

Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox


Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox

Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox


Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox

Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox


Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox

Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox


Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox

Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox


Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox

Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox


Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox

Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox


Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox

Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox


Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox

Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox


Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox

Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox


Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox

Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox


Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox

Happy New Chinese Beers N Noodles of the Ox

Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China

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