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Mid Autumn Festival N its Strange to Feel Strange

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya, Do you often sit and look at the Shangzhou hills and wonder what is up there? Me either, I just thought I'd ask. Actually I did today so I went on walkabout to find out and do you want to know what is up there? An alien spacecraft! Honestly! After lunch I headed out to go to the supermarket to do some shopping and four hours later I found myself standing before a small concrete wall way up in the hills and at the end of a track. Aliens, there has to be an alien spaceship buried somewhere beneath that wall and strange things will begin to happen to me the more I return to it to help set it free. My teeth will begin to fall out and soon after I will able to talk to you with my mind! Well, that all would have happened if this was a Stephen King novel! Man I miss reading Stephen King! Sadly for you, me and everyone else reading this, it is but a Travelblog and none of it happened that way. What did happen was, I was going to go shopping but decided that as it was Mid Autumn Festival I would probably get a billion Moon Cakes left at my door so I would spend the day walking in the hills instead of eating. So I found a road that I thought headed out into the hills and began walking. It ended not long after so I walked back, found another and began again.

This one ended after about ten minutes so I once again walked back, found yet another road and after snaking my way up the mounting through beautiful little villages etc for two hours I figured that I had found my road and happily continued. My walk was full of beauty and I spent almost the entire time walking past terraced corn fields. In the south it would have been what people normally associate China with and that's terraced rice fields. But terraced corn fields! I may have seen them during some of my adventures but I don't remember ever noticing them. Once at the top I looked down and there was layer upon layer of small corn fields filling my view. I don't think they will ever make a BBC documentary like some of China's rice terraces but I found them pretty stunning all the same. Not only did the corn in the fields fill my vision on my walk but everywhere I looked I could see corn cobs all bunched together hanging from peoples balconies and trees like bananas. And how 'un-strange' it was that I was stared at like I was a big monkey walking by! Hahahahahahahahahahhahahahahahahahaha! Ow man, I'm so funny! NOT! Near the top and not long after the last village the concrete road turned into a small track. I continued walk along this for another half and hour and then a strange sight came into view. A girl was coming from the other direction. I guess that really isn't that strange but what was strange was that she didn't look at all like a farmer. Her clothing was not that of a poor farming family either. How strange I thought, what in the world was she doing up here and walking alone? When she spotted me she nearly fell off the side of the mountain in shock and amazement!. I then thought, how strange it is to find something strange when you are a stranger in a strange land! I guess I am used to riding and walking in weird places where I usually only find farmers out in the fields but it wasn't until I saw the absolute amazement on her face when she saw me that I remembered that she wasn't the stranger at all. She was Chinese, from small Chinese village somewhere down the road and in China. I was a foreigner in a strange land and way up and out in the middle of nowhere. Indeed I thought! How strange I must have looked to her! After we said goodbye I continued along the track that led me around the other side of the mountain. I then had to cross a narrow ledge and soon after the track simply stopped at a very small concrete wall. It really was the most amazing and confusing thing. There was no evidence of it ever having continued. It just stopped and why in the world there was a small concrete wall I have no idea. It wasn't a tomb now any type of burial structure. Maybe when it rains heavily it helps slow some of the water running down the hill but I couldn't figure out why. I then began to wonder where the girl was coming from. The only obvious answer is that she is an alien searching for her buried spaceship. She obviously couldn't find it so she was returning to mingle with the human population. Ok then! Yeah Right! On that note I guess we should change the subject to what is happening here in China this very weekend and the reason behind the fact that while you are reading this at work I will be at home still sleeping due to the fact that it is a public holiday here on Monday. <u>The Mid Autumn Festival</u>[/i]</b> [/i] Also known as the "Full Moon Festival," the Mid-Autumn festival falls on the fifteen day of the eighth lunar month. At this time, the moon's orbit is at its lowest angle to the horizon, making the moon appear brighter and larger than any other time of the year. In the Western tradition, it is also called the Hunter's Moon or Harvest Moon. [/i] [/i] According to the lunar calendar, it is also the exact middle of autumn.[/i] Which begins in the seventh month and ends in the ninth. [/i] [/i] To the Chinese, this festival is similar to the American Thanksgiving holiday, celebrating a bountiful harvest. Compared to many Chinese festivals that are inundated with vibrant colours and sounds, the Mid-Autumn festival remains more subdued. Traditionally celebrated outdoors under the moonlight, people eat moon cakes and gaze at the moon. In modern times, barbecues with families and friends are also common. [/i] [/i] The words of the great Tang Dynasty poet Li Bai are often recited on such evenings, even today: 'I raise my head to gaze at the bright moon, and I drop my head to think of my old home' [/i] [/i] <u>Legendary Origins</u>[/i] </b> [/i] Like most Chinese holidays, the mid-autumn festival is rich in oral history and legend. According to stories, Hou Yi was a tyrannical ruler who won the elixir of immortality by shooting nine suns out of the sky with his bow. But his wife, knowing that the people's lives would remain miserable for all eternity if Hou Yi lived forever, drank the potion. The fluids made her lighter, and she floated up into the moon. [/i] [/i] Even today, Chinese like to think of the moon as home of Chang E. [/i] [/i] <u>A Historical Anecdote</u>[/i]</b> [/i] The Mongol Hordes of Ghengis Khan subjugated the Chinese, and established the Yuan Dynasty in the 13th Century. However, many Chinese resented the fact that they were ruled by a foreign regime. In the 14th Century, Liu Bouwen helped plot the overthrow of the Yuan Dynasty by organizing resistance. Secret messages were passed along in moon cakes. [/i] [/i] <u>Mooncakes</u>[/i] </b> [/i] The ubiquitous fare at any Chinese celebration of the Full Moon festival, moon cakes are a flaked pastry stuffed with a wide variety of fillings. Egg Yolk, lotus seed paste, red bean paste, and coconut are common, but walnuts, dates, and other fillings can be found as well. Most have characters for longevity or harmony inscribed on the top. [/i] [/i] Special cakes can reach almost one foot in diameter. [/i] [/i] Beers N Noodles toya.....shane ___________________________________________ The soundtrack to this entry was 'Cat Stevens' The album was 'Tea for Tillerman' ____________________________________________

Mid Autumn Festival Corn Walk

Mid Autumn Festival Corn Walk


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Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China

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