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Happy Chinese Teachers Day N Pagoda Hill Walk

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya, Teachers Day...again! How quickly the last year has passed by! When Luo Wei rang to say good night last night she wished me 'Happy Teachers Day for tomorrow'. Memories of the past year flashed on by and I realised that another year really had passed and that Luo Wei and I had also been together for over a year now. How awesome is life when you jam pack it so full of 'stuff' that you can't actually think of anything you would change! I woke to what I thought was someone trying to force the schools loud speaker system up my.....into my ear! After remembering it was Teachers Day I stopped thinking there was a fire in the building and started the day with a coffee. Of course it wasn't until I was just about to head out the door and race to class that somebody thought to ring me and tell me not to bother with the first class as they were having a Teachers Day assembly out on the playground. Gee, I never would have guessed! After morning classes all the teachers headed to a huge restaurant up the road and over passed the temple near the bus station. Lunch was quite bizarre really. Of course the food was awesome but I was strangely put in a room with all the 'a little older than me' female teachers and only one of them could speak English. This wasn't a bad thing as we had a good time and they are great people, but it was just a little strange for me not to be 'used as a trophy' type thing by the school Leaders. There was only one bottle of beer and of course it was bloody warm! In the other 'big party' room everyone was yahooing and having a great time. When the girls wanted to go I was told to go home and rest as I must be tired. This was also strange as usually it would be off to KTV or to simply stay put and drink and eat more. I soon began drowning in memories of my time in Gansu Province where I was 'protected' so much that no one drank beer at a dinner. It really is bizarre when you compare it to my time in Guangxi where I was almost force fed Rice Wine by a drip and pretty much told not to come home at night until I had shared several bottles of beer with who ever wanted me at their table at the Night Market. Why? Because it was a tiny town, I taught most of their children and they paid my salary. Then there was Fujian Province and the uncountable amount of beers that flowed freely through out each and every big dinner. It didn't matter how many you wanted (or didn't want) it just kept coming. There was never just a 'one glass' cheers, instead you had to down three or four and I do remember one night bloating myself after a ten glass cheers. But here? I was told they are protecting their investment! I wonder though, are they protecting me from being robbed when I am drunk or simply making sure I am fit for class tomorrow. Which ever one I thought it was a nice thing to do but I also thought I would celebrate Teachers Day on my own or with some friends on MSN and QQ so I grabbed a couple of cold beers on the way home from my walk. I had to laugh as each time I grab a beer or two I get it from the little store 'thing' next to the school, I always ask for 'cold beer' but I always get a no.

He stores his beer in the fridge but it's never been turned on until tonight. How extremely happy was I when he ran to the fridge and wallah! A couple of coldies were placed on the counter before me. I think it will actually do me good being here. It is soooo much poorer than Shaowu so I doubt there will be many big dinners at all. In fact I live in fear of there being many as maybe I will be put in 'that' room again and given one bottle of warm beer. Today was actually a good day, I got to know the girls better and we all chatted happily together so it sounds worse than it was. It is just strange as usually, like I said above you are almost forced fed your beer. After I got home I decided to head out for a walk and after a few hours I found myself walking along a road that took me to a cemetery on a hill. I'm not sure who is buried in there but it is not any normal Joe Blogs (or should I say Wang Wongs being in China). I then noticed a few pagoda's much higher on the hills behind me but there was a large brick wall between me and them. I also couldn't find a pathway to take me there so I though bugger it, I'll just jump the fence. I finally made it to the top and found a heap of bushes at the bottom.

I hung from the top of the wall and began swinging myself. When I thought I had enough of a swing to clear the bushes I let go.

No such luck! I ended up crashing through them and landed at the feet of a group of people standing near by watching me. When I got up and saw them looking at me I said a big happy hello. When they realized who I was many of them said 'Foreigner' (in Chinese) and as if that explained everything most of them giggled and said hello back and then continued on their way up the hill. The walk was beautiful and it takes a few hours to get from the bottom, all the way across to the third Pagoda and then back down to the bottom again. It was growing dark as I left the third pagoda but thankfully half the town was on the hill for their evening walk so I had no problem finding my way back down. I am serious and most of them would be over fifty. I can't believe how fit the elderly Chinese people are. It really does put most western people to shame who are under the age of forty. Here they are still pulling carts and riding bikes to and from everywhere they go. They then take a simple after dinner stroll for a few hours up a mountains etc. Those who have lived here will understand and totally agree with me. Many of them even put me to shame!

The photo of the pool table.

I watched that guy the other night move about ten normal pool tables with his cart. They are all made of wood and heavy as buggery. He does this twice a day and by twice a day I mean puts them out after lunch and puts them away before dinner. He then puts them out again after dinner and puts them away before bed. He would have to be well over fifty years old. Most farmers are the same. Everything is manually done and most of them have to either walk or ride their bike for many kilometers to get to their land. The same goes with road workers etc. At the end of each day when i ride I pass heaps of them and each have their own shovel or pick etc slung over their shoulder. Anyhow, for those who want to know a little about Teachers Day continue reading. If you read it last year then scroll down to the photos below. Beers N Noodles toya.....shane _______________________________________ The soundtrack to this entry was by Red Kross. The album was 'Phaseshifter' _______________________________________ <u> Respect for Teachers and Learning </u></b> In the history of Chinese education, Confucius is a paragon of all teachers, symbolizing the philosophy of "Educate all without discrimination, and teach according to the abilities of ones students." Using the six arts of rites, music, archery, chariot driving, learning (including reading and writing), and mathematics, Confucius had more than three thousand disciples during his lifetime. In practice of his credo, the Sage never refused a student because of his class or character, requiring only that his pupils possess a sincere desire to learn. During the crisis of the 'Spring and Autumn Period', Confucius sought to end the chaos of the times. Believing this disorder to be a reflection of declining morals in society, he exhaustively toured the various warring Chinese states to advise rulers and officials on the merits of ethical rule. In his later years, Confucius reorganized the ancient texts, thus laying a solid foundation for China's enduring civilization. In 1939 the Ministry of Education pronounced that Confucius' birthday would be celebrated on August 28, and designated it as Teachers' Day as well as a national holiday to remember Confucius' enormous contribution to Chinese culture and society. The date was changed to September 28 in 1952 in accordance with chronologists' new findings. Today, Teachers' Day not only commemorates China's foremost teacher in history but also honours all teachers for their hard work during the year. The first Teachers' Day was in 1931, the date was June 6, organized by a group of famous teachers without being officially approved by the Kuomintang Government. In 1939, the Kuomintang Government decided to set the Teachers Day on August 28 (Confucius's birthday), due to the turmoil, it was never carried out throughout the whole country. In 1951, the New China government decided to set the Teachers' Day on May 1, the same day with Labour Day, this wasn't ever popular. Finally, teachers found a day to celebrate their glorious career in 1985, since then, on September 10 every year, teachers all over the country get special attention and gifts for their services to this country. Every year during Teachers' Day, the Confucius Memorial Service is solemnly held at the Confucius Temple to show respect and honour for the Sage. At the "Teachers Day Celebration" held by the Ministry of Education and the various local governments, teachers with the highest seniority and best qualities are recognized for their contribution to society. Being a teacher in China is not simply a job. It is one of the most respected careers.

Teachers Day Pagoda Walk

Teachers Day Pagoda Walk


1-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk

1-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk


2-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk

2-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk


3-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk

3-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk


4-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk

4-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk


5-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk

5-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk


6-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk

6-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk


7-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk

7-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk


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8-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk


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9-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk


10-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk

10-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk


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11-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk


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12-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk


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13-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk


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14-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk


15-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk

15-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk


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16-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk


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17-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk


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18-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk


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19-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk


20-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk

20-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk


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21-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk


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22-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk


23-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk

23-Teachers Day Pagoda Walk

Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China

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