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The Historical Residence Gao Yue Song

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya Let's talk about the drink Red Bull. Here I sit after laying awake for the last hour or so after trying to have an early night as tomorrow is my last free day. This obviously means that as of midnight tomorrow night the 2008 Beers N Noodles Summer adventure ends. So where does Red Bull come into this story? I was feeling a little tired after many hours walking so I thought hey, why not get a huge hit of caffeine and Vit B into me. Instead of the small can of Red Bull I chose the Chinese version which is a bottle the size of Mizone (which is my usual choice). It is called Red Oxen and as there is four times as much I guess it lasts four times longer. I know what I will be having with my brunch tomorrow! I had an awesome day today! I began my day by aimlessly walking around the north western quarter of the city. You know no matter how many cities I visit and no matter how long I am here I will never get used to many of the ways they do things. It is only when we go camping or I guess a when a tourist goes to Australia that you 'boil the billy' on an open flame. Here it is a normal every day thing in most parts of China. As you walk around the ancient parts of even a modern city such as Xian you will see a kettle that has been placed to boil on an open flame. I can't even begin to describe the different types if open flames I walk past on any given daily adventure. If I was to try then I would have t begin trying to describe all the different ways they bake their breads. Here it is normal to bake different styles of bread in an ancient oven over an open fire. But to us is seems so primitive to do such things. Yet many of my daily meals come from such things. So many different breads baked in such a primitive manner and all filled with such delicious fillings such as lamb and beef with or without some sort of vegetable. It is not only the breads but actually all ways of cooking here in China that for us seem so primitive. Here is the Lonely Planets description of what you can look forward to in Xian; Hit the Muslim streets for fine eating in. Common dishes here are Majang Lianpi (cold noodles in sesame sause), fenzhengrou (chopped mutton fried in a wok with ground wheat), roujiamo (fried pork or beef in pita bread, sometimes with green peppers and cumin), caijamo (the vegetarian version) and the ubiquitious rouchuan (kagabs). Best of all is the delicious Yangrou paomo (a soup dish that involves srumbling a flat loaf of bread into a bowl of noodles and adding mutton and broth). You can also pick up mouth watering deserts such as huashenggao (peanut cakes) and shibing (dried persimmons), which cab be found at the market or in the Muslim Quarter shops. I am serious, here in China it is nothing like most would have ever seen. Xian is an ancient full of different peoples and ancient cooking methods. Most places I choose to live and teach have their own ancient styles of living and cooking. All use mostly the same methods that we would call 'primitive' when we compare them to our own. Yet strangely there is no comparison when it comes to taste. I guess it is like comparing a modern loaf of bread to what we in Australia know as 'Damper'. When you compare there really is no comparison, damper wins hands down! I then decided to visit the south western outside corner that I walked through after dark not so long ago. I slowly made my way to the west gate and whistled my way towards the corner where I sat reading, watching the birds in the trees and talking to a girl named Nancy in the sunshine for several hours. After she left I decided to head back to the Islamic Market Street to visit the 'Ancient Styled Folk House'. Here I encountered another daily encounter, when all Muslims bow to Mecca. It seriously leaves one in a bewildered state of wondering where in earth they actually are. All becomes silent except for the sounds of Mecca. All across the Muslim Quarter in all cities are the chants that tell all it is time to bow. It seriously is like being in a movie such as 'Alden's Lamp' Anyhow, I had walked passed this place almost on a daily basis each time I have visited Xian city but I had never visited it. Mainly because out front it is advertised as an Art Exhibition and being in such a touristy area I never bothered with it. It wasn't until I looked in the LP for something to do or see that I hadn't before and then when I checked out where the address actually was that I figured out it had to be the same place that I had walked past a million times. So this time I didn't continue towards the Drum Tower I asked about the entrance fee and was given the following two options; The Historical Residence costs 20 Yuan if you wish to participate in the short tea ceremony and 15 Yuan if you wish to simply walk around taking photos. I chose to begin my visit with several refreshing small cups of tea. I got to chose three different varieties and the beautiful tea girl (who had rather large......um.....tea cups) took me though the Chinese tea ceremony. This I've sat through in many different homes of my friends. It is all about using tiny little tea cups and tiny little tea pots. You then use large tweezers and rinse your tiny little cup with tea before and after use. All tea tables are beautiful and seem to be a large cut from a rather large tree trunk. But not all tea girls have such large.....um.....tea cups here in China! As there is a tiny drainage system throughout the entire table you can rinse away and spill tea to your hearts content and never have to worry about cleaning your mess. After a few beers I'm sure we could all use one of these. Hey, maybe I should patent the Aussie Beer Ceremony table! I guess they would have to be in the shape of a football or a football field! I then slowly walked around taking pictures and chatted to a few people from Norway and then some others from Germany. It was such a romantic time as the red lanterns were all lit and it reminded me a lot of when I was in Pingyao. There really is something about red lanterns and ancient stone buildings and paths to bring out the romantic in you. Maybe if I sell enough Aussie Beer Ceremony tables I could afford one of these pads! On my way home I gave Luo Wei a call and happily found out that her Army Training had finished today and that she would be in bed by eleven this evening and could sleep in until seven thirty tomorrow morning. She will also have next weekend free so I am hoping that my new school won't have any plans for their new teacher and that I can meet Luo Wei back in Xian and hire a beautiful room for her to relax and sleep in for the entire weekend. She has now worked a month without a single days rest! And all of those days have been from around six in the morning and have ended around one in the morning. I think it is time for her to rest and to be pampered like a Princess! Whilst I've been writing this I've been watching this crazy movie about what are known as 'Jumpers'. These guys can jump though worm holes at the blink of an eye. An awesome movie in which Samuel L Jackson plays the white haired guy who is the leader of a team hunting down the 'Jumpers', but I have no idea of the title of the movie. Why am I telling you this? Because it reminds me of what I see people doing when they head beneath the Bell Tower. Soon after they can then be seen popping up at different exits until they find the right one. Hahahaha! I'm usually one of them! But I am finally getting the hang of it now! Beers N Noodles toya.....shane _________________________________________________________ The soundtrack to this entry was by Massive Attack The album was 'Mezzanine' __________________________________________________________ <u>The Historical Residence and Folk House </u>(Gao Jia Daqyuan) The former residence of Gao Yue Song is located at No 144 of Bei Yuan Men Xian. The whole villa covers an area of 2517m2. In total there are eighty six rooms of which some fifty six rooms are open to the public. It is mainly brick and wood structure. Gao Yue Song was born in Zhen Jiang, Jiang Su Province. Two hundred years ago he took the imperial examination and placed second. All seven generations of the Gao family got official positions in the royal palace. In 1966 the government confiscated the residence and it was listed as a 'key project of Sino-Norway Historical Districts Protection' in 1999 and invested in by Norway. The residence was thoroughly repaired and won the 'Prize for Cultural Heritage Protection in Asian-Pacific Area of UNESO' in 2002. In 2003, the art department of Xian Traditional Chinese Painting Institute took charge of renovation fir the residence. It was assigned as the teaching base for the Architecture Department of Norway Trondheim University and postgraduate of Xian Architecture and Technology University and as the research base for the Institute of Famous Historical and Cultural City Research of Chang'an University. The main contents involve: Architecture of Ming and Qing Dynasties, old furniture, "couplet culture" of traditional fold residence, brick caving, tea house, paper cuttings, shadow show, performance of Zheng, calligraphy and paintings by famous people, elaborate works of traditional Chinese paintings. Old photos, pottery and porcelain, typical Shaan Xi style tourist souvenirs and so on.

Sth East Cnr &#38;amp; Historical Residence

Sth East Cnr &#38;amp; Historical Residence


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1-Sth East Cnr &#38;amp; Historical Residence


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2-Sth East Cnr &#38;amp; Historical Residence


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27-Sth East Cnr &#38;amp; Historical Residence

Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China

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