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Young Pioneers Day in China

Hey Hey and a Big G'Day toya, Though today being October 13th is the actual 'Celebration' for Young Pioneers Day here in China all schools obviously had to celebrate it yesterday (Friday, 12th October). It was a day that all students over the past week have been practicing for both during and after school. Though all students have being spending many hours practicing I was more than proud of one group in particular. Many of my Grade 5 students made up the school band for this years celebration. Each night for many weeks they have been.....

.....ANNOYING THE ABSOLUTE SHITE OUT OF EVERYONE WHO EITHER LIVES AT THE SCHOOL OR ANYWHERE AROUND THE AREA! BANG BANG BOOM BOOM TRUMPET TRUMPET BLAST BLAST BOOM BOOM BANG BANG On the afternoon when I would try to get some 'Lesson Stuff' done prior to going for my daily ride I would have to have my iPod up as loud as my little computer speakers could go. I would then have to run around the house closing all my windows and I would still sit cringing at the huge noise blasting through my skull. In the end I would always give in and run down stairs, jump on my bike and make my way out onto the basketball court where the students would be practicing all different things from sports to drums and trumpets. ARGH! But once there, I would always stop for ten minutes to watch them practicing. When they would see me riding across the court they would look over with a huge proud smile and try even harder. So finally the big day came and everyone wore their red scarf with a little extra pride.

All the students were assembled on the sports area and several tables had been set up for the school and city leaders. Speeches were given and whilst I tried my best to hide on the third floor Jo and Rob were found and led to the 'Leaders Table' where everyone from the News Papers to the Television Stations took film and photos of them. A little while later I was spotted taking some happy snaps and was led to the spare seat beside them. BUGGER! Not really, not so bad. The camera's had gone but some of the speeches were still going. Soon the Grade 3 Students were all bought forward and the Grade 4 students proudly exchanged their Green Scarves for Red ones which was their initiation into becoming a Young Pioneer of China. After all the speeches and scarf exchanges the marching band proudly made its way through the crowd. The band was led by one of my favourite students named Eva. If you were to speak to her on the phone you would easily mistake her for a young American. She learned most of her English from tapes and DVD's and when I first met her last December I could have sworn her father must have been American.

I was so happy they got through all their swirls and different formations without any mistakes and I happily ran across to congratulate them afterwards. Most of them couldn't stop smiling. It was such a happy moment for them all! So that was my Young Pioneers Day parade here in Fujian Province. I don't remember celebrating it at all whilst living in Guangxi or Gansu but I do remember that all students wore their Green and Red Scarves. Below you will find the history of Young Pioneers Day. Below that you'll find some photos of my day. Beers N Noodles toya.....shane _________________________ The soundtrack to this entry was 'The Black Crows and Jimmy Page' The album was 'Live At The Greek' Honestly, could you get a better album than that? <u>From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia</u>[/i]</b> The Young Pioneers of China is a mass youth organization for children in the People's Republic of China. The Young Pioneers of China is run by the Communist Youth League, an organization of older youth that comes under the Communist Party of China. The Young Pioneers of China is similar to Pioneer Movements that exist or existed in many Communist countries around the world. <u>HISTORY</u></b> <u> </u></b> The Youth and Children of China Movement was created on October 13, 1949 by the Communist Party of China, and given its present name in June 1953. Between its own founding in 1921 and the founding of the People's Republic in 1949, the Chinese Communist Party ran various other youth movements in communist-held areas. During the Cultural Revolution (1966-1978), the Young Pioneers Movement was defunct. Instead, it was replaced by the Little Red Guards, who were the younger counterparts of the Red Guards, the implementers of the Cultural Revolution. The Young Pioneers Movement was restarted in October 1978. The retrocession of Hong Kong and Macau in 1997 and 1999 respectively has not seen the expansion of Communist Party organizations to those areas, including the Young Pioneers. <u>MEMBERSHIP</u> </b> Young Pioneers consist of children between the ages of six and fourteen; upon reaching the age of fourteen, members automatically exit the Young Pioneers and may go on to join the Communist Youth League. There were an estimated 130 million Young Pioneers in China, as of 2002. [1]

<u>ORGANISATION</u></b> According to the Young Pioneers constitution, each school or village organizes a "large detachment" which is divided into "medium detachments" each corresponding to a class, which is then further divided into "small detachments" each with a handful of members. Each small detachment has a leader and an assistant leader; each medium detachment is led by a committee of between three to seven members; and each large detachment is led by a committee of between seven and fifteen members. Adult leaders are chosen from either the Communist Youth League or from local teaching staff. <u>CONSTITUTION</u></b>

The Constitution was officially passed on June 1, 1954, on international Children's Day. It has since been amended many times. The full text is available on Wikisource. <u>SYMBOLS</u></b> Flag[/i]</b> According to the Young Pioneers Constitution, the flag is red, symbolizing the victory of the Revolution; the five-pointed star in the middle symbolizes the leadership of the Communist Party, while the torch symbolizes brightness down the path of communism. The flag of each large detachment is 90 x 120 cm, while the flag of each medium detachment is 60 x 80 cm, with an isosceles triangle (60 x 20 cm) removed from the right side. The removed triangle corresponds to the red scarf worn by Young Pioneers. Emblem[/i]</b> The emblem consists of the star, the torch, and a banner reading "Young Pioneers of China". Scarf[/i]</b> The red scarf is the only uniform item. Young Pioneers are often referred to simply as "Red Scarves"; the Investiture Ceremony often consists of new members having their scarves tied for them by existing members. Children wearing red scarves are a ubiquitous sight in China. The red scarf is generally worn around the neck and tied, with no woggle. Some local groups also come up with other uniform items. The Young Pioneers Constitution explains that the scarf corresponds to the missing triangle on the medium detachment flag. The Constitution also explains that the red of the scarf comes from the blood sacrificed by martyrs of the Revolution, and that all members should therefore wear the scarf with reverence. Salute, Slogan, Conduct, Promise[/i]</b> The Young Pioneers Salute consists of bending the right arm and raising the right hand directly above the head, the palm flat and facing downwards, and the fingers together. It symbolizes that the interests of the People supersede all. The Slogan is: Translation: "Be prepared, to struggle for the cause of Communism!" To which the reply is: Translation: "Always be prepared!" The stipulated conduct of Young Pioneers, according to the constitution, is: Translation: Honesty, Courage, Vivacity, Unity The Young Pioneers pledge is: Translation: I am a member of the Young Pioneers of China. Under the Pioneers Flag I promise that: I love the Communist Party of China, I love the motherland, I love the people; I will study well and keep myself fit [lit. exercise well], to prepare for: contributing my effort to the cause of communism. <u>THE YOUNG PIONEERS SONG IS: </u> </b> We are the heirs of communism. It was originally the theme song of Heroic Little Eighth-Routers, a 1961 film about the 1958 Second Taiwan Strait Crisis and a real-life group of children who stayed on the frontlines of coastal Fujian in order to help the war effort against Kuomintang forces. The lyrics are:[/i] We are the heirs of communism, Inheriting the glorious tradition of the fore bearers of the Revolution; [To] love the motherland and the people, [While] the crimson red scarf flutters [or waves] at [our] chest. [We] do not fear hardship, nor the enemy, Studying hard and struggling with resolve; Towards victory, [we] courageously advance, Towards victory, [we] courageously advance, Towards victory, [we] courageously advance; We are the heirs of communism. We are the heirs of communism, Along the glorious path of the forebearers of the Revolution; [To] love the motherland and the people, "Young Pioneer Members" is our proud name. Ever be prepared, to contribute [i.e. to the cause], [And] to destroy completely the enemy. For [our] ideal, [we] courageously advance, For [our] ideal, [we] courageously advance, For [our] ideal, [we] courageously advance; We are the heirs of communism.

Young Pioneers Day Parade

Young Pioneers Day Parade


Young Pioneers Day Parade 1

Young Pioneers Day Parade 1


Young Pioneers Day Parade 2

Young Pioneers Day Parade 2


Young Pioneers Day Parade 3

Young Pioneers Day Parade 3


Young Pioneers Day Parade 4

Young Pioneers Day Parade 4


Young Pioneers Day Parade 5

Young Pioneers Day Parade 5


Young Pioneers Day Parade 6

Young Pioneers Day Parade 6


Young Pioneers Day Parade 7

Young Pioneers Day Parade 7


Young Pioneers Day Parade 8

Young Pioneers Day Parade 8


Young Pioneers Day Parade 9

Young Pioneers Day Parade 9


Young Pioneers Day Parade 10

Young Pioneers Day Parade 10


Young Pioneers Day Parade 11

Young Pioneers Day Parade 11


Young Pioneers Day Parade 12

Young Pioneers Day Parade 12


Young Pioneers Day Parade 13

Young Pioneers Day Parade 13


Young Pioneers Day Parade 14

Young Pioneers Day Parade 14

Posted by eddakath 17:00 Archived in China

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